Appliance Repair in Visali, CA

Let's Talk!

At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

Book Your Service Call
Schedule your service call

We work with your busy schedule to get you the service you need.

Technician Diagnoses
Technician Diagnoses

Your factory-trained technician will travel to your location and diagnose your appliance problem.

Quote & Repair
Quote & Repair

We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Visali, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Visali, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
  • Contact Us
  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

Physical-therapy-phone-number(559)-446-1071

Contact Us

Latest News in Visali, CA

Raising Cane’s announces Visalia opening date

Raising Cane’s Visalia location is slated to open on Aug. 3, plans on hiring 120 management and hourly staffVISALIA – One of Visalia’s newest restaurants has zeroed in on an opening date, and people are raising their hands for chicken fingers.Raising Cane’s Visalia’s location has been under construction for months. And as of last week the chicken finger restaurant announced they’ll open their doors on Aug. 3. The company stated in a press release that they’re excited to...

Raising Cane’s Visalia location is slated to open on Aug. 3, plans on hiring 120 management and hourly staff

VISALIA – One of Visalia’s newest restaurants has zeroed in on an opening date, and people are raising their hands for chicken fingers.

Raising Cane’s Visalia’s location has been under construction for months. And as of last week the chicken finger restaurant announced they’ll open their doors on Aug. 3. The company stated in a press release that they’re excited to capture all of the traffic created by the national parks and nearby College of the Sequoias down Mooney Boulevard.

“The new Restaurant is conveniently located in a popular shopping area, less than three miles from the College of the Sequoias, so we are expecting to see a lot of locals and visitors alike stop in to get their chicken finger fix,” regional vice president Chris Zygler said. “Now that we’ve found the perfect location, we will soon start hiring an enthusiastic crew…as we work towards becoming an integral part of this city.”

The press release stated that they will be hiring as many as 120 local “crewmembers” for multiple positions ranging from management to hourly employment.

Raising Cane’s will make its Northern California debut in Hanford on July 6 and has big plans for continued expansion throughout the San Joaquin Valley.

At Raising Cane’s, it all starts with the chicken finger. The 100% premium white meat chicken tenderloins are marinated, hand-battered and cooked to order. The menu is also renowned for its craveable—some say addictive—secret-recipe Cane’s sauce, crinkle-cut fries, coleslaw, Texas toast, freshly brewed sweet tea and fresh-squeezed lemonade. The company is likewise known for its commitment to active community involvement, centered on its six areas of focus: education, feeding the hungry, pet welfare, business development and entrepreneurship, active lifestyles and “everything else!”

Raising Cane’s is consistently ranked among the top restaurant brands for food quality, speed of service, cleanliness, and customer service. In 2020, Sandelman ranked Raising Cane’s the third-highest restaurant brand in the U.S. for overall customer satisfaction. Technomic also recently announced Cane’s was voted by its customers as the top fast-casual restaurant for customer safety during the pandemic.

Visalia's city-run orchards are hemorrhaging millions. Is it time to reconsider the practice?

After banking on walnuts and pecans to shore up finances and create value on city-owned land, Visalia reported net losses in its farming operations totaling nearly $2 million since 2019."For many reasons, the city finds itself to be a farmer but doesn't mean to be," Jeremy Rogers, Visalia Community Services Director, told council members. "Periodically, we need to pause and make sure we are making sound business decisions."The city's farming operations lost about a million dollars a year in 20...

After banking on walnuts and pecans to shore up finances and create value on city-owned land, Visalia reported net losses in its farming operations totaling nearly $2 million since 2019.

"For many reasons, the city finds itself to be a farmer but doesn't mean to be," Jeremy Rogers, Visalia Community Services Director, told council members. "Periodically, we need to pause and make sure we are making sound business decisions."

The city's farming operations lost about a million dollars a year in 2019 and 2020, according to Rogers, who emphasized multiple times to the council that he is "not a farmer."

Jeb Headrick, a Hanford-based grower who was contracted to manage the orchards, said those costs are inflated because it took a lot of resources to bring the orchards back to a healthy state.

In 2019, the city's long-term farming contracts expired, and some of the orchards were allowed to become overrun with weeds, some as high as six feet.

The mismanagement occurred at a disastrous time, as the trees were entering maturity and set to produce their highest yields. Headrick was hired in part to return the orchards to good condition.

"It's expensive to farm," he told councilmembers by way of explanation. He added that the market for tree nuts is "more wild than the stock market."

At $2,400 per acre, harvesting is the biggest cost associated with nut farming, according to Headrick. Water and weed control rank second and third.

Most council members questioned the wisdom of continuing farming in light of the ongoing deficit. However, the presentation was an information-only item and so no action could be taken at the Feb. 16 meeting.

"We're losing a million dollars every year. I think we need to take a serious look to see if this is worth it," Councilman Brian Poochigian said. "Because if we were a private entity, we'd be out of business right now."

Visalia Mayor Steve Nelsen, whose brother Joel was CEO of the California Citrus Mutual and a trade advisor to the United States Department of Agriculture for many years, voiced support for the urban orchards.

"The way I look at this and the way growers always look at this is there's a light at the end of the tunnel because now we've improved the situation. The yield will go up," he said.

"You can't control what the market's going to do. And the market is impacted by politics, it's impacted by weather, insects, but if we do everything we're supposed to do, I think we're on the right track, and I think this can be a profitable venture," he added.

The city's orchards are located west of Highway 99 and east of Road 68, near the Water Reclamation Facility. The city maintains 130 acres of walnut trees and 445 acres of pecan trees, making Visalia the county's largest pecan grower.

The city also farms 408 acres of row crops. However, the land is leased by a private company for a flat fee of about $40,000 every six months to grow sorghum and wheat. That means the city assumes none of the risk — or potential rewards — associated with growing the crops.

In late 2019, the city sold 11 acres of walnut trees along Highway 198 to San Joaquin Valley Homes. Since the sale happened before the orchards' first harvest, the city not only lost at least $100,000 in farming costs but also had to sell the land below its appraised value.

Council members decided to establish growing operations on the land near Highway 99 in 2014, on the tail of a bumper year for walnuts that saw the crop selling for above $2 a pound.

This year, the same nuts are likely to sell for 50 or 60 cents a pound, Headrick said. A 100% tariff on walnuts headed to India, one of the globe's biggest export markets, has hit the industry hard.

"As a farmer farming walnuts in full production, you know, we're losing money, and we're waiting for the market to turn around also," he said.

Joshua Yeager covers water, agriculture, parks and housing for the Visalia Times-Delta and Tulare Advance-Register newspapers. Follow him on Twitter @VTD_Joshy. Get alerts and keep up on all things Tulare County for as little as $1 a month. Subscribe today.

Largest Catholic church in U.S. begins construction in Visalia

The largest Catholic church in the western United States will soon have a home — in Visalia.Construction crews broke ground last week on the future site of St. Charles Borromeo — the largest seating-capacity Catholic church in the country, located on Akers Street and Caldwell Avenue in southwest Visalia's Church Corner."It is such a wonderful thing to build a church," said Joseph Brennan, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno. "It’s one thing to build a church, a building...

The largest Catholic church in the western United States will soon have a home — in Visalia.

Construction crews broke ground last week on the future site of St. Charles Borromeo — the largest seating-capacity Catholic church in the country, located on Akers Street and Caldwell Avenue in southwest Visalia's Church Corner.

"It is such a wonderful thing to build a church," said Joseph Brennan, bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno. "It’s one thing to build a church, a building. It is quite another thing to build a community of faith."

St. Charles Borromeo will seat more than 3,000 parishioners. The groundbreaking comes after years of stops and starts and fundraising campaigns to get the project shovel-ready.

"It's been a long time in the making. I'm glad they finally broke ground," parishioner Elaine Carrasco said. "The church has owned this property for decades."

She added that it will benefit priests who "won't feel so rushed" to travel to each of Visalia's worship facilities while providing a centralized place for the growing parish's thousands of families to congregate comfortably.

Construction of the 33,825-square-foot church is expected to take 18 months and will reflect a "California mission-inspired" aesthetic.

"(St. Charles Borromeo) is a landmark for the Diocese of Fresno," said Jacob Alexander, a 16-year-old who has worshiped with the parish his entire life.

Good Shepherd Catholic Parish of Visalia is comprised of four churches: Holy Family, St. Mary’s, St. Charles Borromeo and St. Thomas The Apostle in Goshen.

Founded in 1861, St. Mary’s church is the oldest parish in the Southern San Joaquin Valley.

It is the "mother" church of various parishes in Tulare, Kings and Fresno counties. The founding pastor was Father Daniel Francis Dade who came from Philadelphia in late 1857 and originally was located in Santa Barbara.

He was transferred to the village of Visalia in 1861 and began the present parish covering the entire area of what is now the Diocese of Fresno with around 20 Catholic families.

Today, the parish is home to approximately 11,000 Catholic families and offers numerous ministries and services.

"There are such strong Catholic roots throughout California and the surrounding states, so to have been selected as the city where the largest Catholic Church in the Western United States will reside is a testament to the welcoming environment and community that we've established," said Nellie Freeborn, Visit Visalia executive director.

The construction project is expected to employee more than 450 people. The building is designed to meet or exceed the requirements of the California Green Code for energy efficiency and sustainability, church officials said.

The expansion was the vision of Bishop John Thomas Steinbock who presided over the Fresno diocese from 1991 until his death in 2010. Succeeding bishops continued Steinbock's vision culminating in Tuesday's groundbreaking.

St. Charles is the parish's newest church community.

The current facility opened in 2011 and is named after the famous bishop-saint of Milan, Italy, who was instrumental in establishing Catholic education and seminaries throughout the church.

St. Charles Borromeo Church will serve Visalia's southwest quadrant but is available to all parishioners. The permanent church building is in the planning stages. Mass and other services are now celebrated in the new parish hall.

"I am thrilled that we are embarking on a very challenging and difficult phase of this project, but our project is to grow faith and love," Brennan said. "I know that the level of giving being asked isn't easy for most families .... It's doable but it would stretch people's budgets and pocketbooks.

"But that's what God does. He doesn't just stretch our pocketbooks, he stretches our hearts."

Good Shepherd Catholic Parish is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno.

Brennan was installed as the sixth Bishop of the Diocese in May of 2019.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno consists of 35,239 square miles of the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California, a portion of the Sierra Nevada and some eastern valleys. The diocese consists of all of Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced and Tulare counties.

The total population of the diocesan region is about 2.4 million inhabitants, about a million of whom were registered Catholic as of 2012.

Joshua Yeager covers water, agriculture, parks and housing for the Visalia Times-Delta and Tulare Advance-Register newspapers. Follow him on Twitter @VTD_Joshy. Get alerts and keep up on all things Tulare County for as little as $1 a month. Subscribe today.

Planning a snow day? Here's a list of perfectly powdered spots to go play

Tulare County residents can see snow-covered peaks all around thanks to recent storms.If you are thinking of packing up the children, sleds or skis here are a few spots that are easily accessible for Tulare County residents.China Peak China Peak Mountain Resort, located east of Fresno at Huntington Lake in the Sierra National Forest has seen more than 17 feet of snow this month.And staff at...

Tulare County residents can see snow-covered peaks all around thanks to recent storms.

If you are thinking of packing up the children, sleds or skis here are a few spots that are easily accessible for Tulare County residents.

China Peak

China Peak Mountain Resort, located east of Fresno at Huntington Lake in the Sierra National Forest has seen more than 17 feet of snow this month.

And staff at the mountain resort expect more.

"We should see a few inches of light snow today and tonight, perhaps 3 to 5 inches on the ground by Thursday morning, maybe another inch or so Thursday and then sunny Friday through the weekend."

Highway 168, which leads to China Peak, is open and "in excellent shape."

However, visitors should make sure they have tire chains ready.

Giant Sequoia Monument

Seasonal road closures are in place for most forest service maintained roads in Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest.

But visitors can still access snowy playgrounds in the area.

Above Dunlap, Quail Flat and Big Meadow winter trailheads can be accessed off of Generals Highway, weather permitting. Make a right turn past the Big Stump Entrance Station on Highway 180 to access these sites. Both trailheads provide safe parking, restrooms, and trash services.

Above Porterville, snow seekers will find a snow play area near Quaking Aspen Campground on Highway 190. Wishon Campground is also open year-round for camping.

"If you decide to stop at a turnout along the highway for snow play, be sure your vehicle is parked completely off the roadway," said Denise Alonzo, spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service. "Watch your children carefully to ensure they do not play on roads or sled into the roadway."

Alonzo suggests visitors bring:

Road closure and chain control information can be found on Caltrans’ website http://www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roads.cgi

Many high-elevation roads under county jurisdiction; Highway 180 past the Hume Lake cutoff, Western Divide Highway past Ponderosa Lodge, and Mountain Road 50 over Parker Pass are also closed.

"Due to recent cold storms, tire chains are required at elevations as low as 2,000 feet," Alonzo said. "Be aware of black ice on the roadways and always carry tire chains in your vehicle during winter months."

Snowmobiling is limited to roads in the monument and all state vehicle code regulations apply, Alonzo added.

For the most up-to-date information, call the Hume Lake Ranger District at 338-2251, or the Western Divide Ranger District at 539-2607, Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Kings Canyon National Park

Grant Grove in Kings Canyon National Parks is still accessible from Highway 180 with tire chain control.

The Grant Grove area offers plenty of sledding options and a market. It also offers those looking for a bigger snack the Grant Grove Restaurant, which seats more than 200 people.

For the most current road conditions and closures at Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks, visit www.nps.gov/seki/planyourvisit/conditions.htm

Sheyanne Romero covers Tulare County public safety, local government and business for the Visalia Times-Delta and Tulare Advance-Register newspapers. Follow her on Twitter @sheyanne_VTD. Get alerts and keep up on all things Tulare County for as little as $1 a month. Subscribe today.

A look back: Visalia and Tulare's most historic fires

As fire investigators probe the cause of Wednesday's Tesori mansion fire in Tulare, we thought it would be interesting to look back at some other historic blazes in the Visalia and Tulare area.According to...

As fire investigators probe the cause of Wednesday's Tesori mansion fire in Tulare, we thought it would be interesting to look back at some other historic blazes in the Visalia and Tulare area.

According to Derryl Dumermuth's "A Town Called Tulare," the city was ravaged by fire three times — in 1875, 1883 and again in 1886 — over 14 years after its 1872 founding.

On July 6, 1875, most of Tulare's 43 buildings — with an estimated population of 145 — burned to the ground.

The residents quickly rebuilt, Dumermuth wrote, but (unwisely) used easily available wood.

Tulare burns—again

Eight years later, on July 29, 1883, a fire devastated Tulare's main business district, destroying 25 buildings. When the fire finally burned itself out, only one building remained in the main business block.

Among the casualties of that summer's blaze: Tulare's largest general store, J. Goldman & Co., and both hotels.

After the fire, Tulare Register editor A.J. Pillsbury wrote a scathing editorial denouncing looters and witnesses who stood idly by and watched Tulare burn.

In August of 1886, another fire devastated downtown Tulare — 77 downtown buildings burned to the ground. The cause of the blaze? A horse or cow kicked over a kerosene lantern at Mazeppa Stables, in the 100 block of North K Street.

The youngest hero of the day, Dumermuth wrote, was 8-year-old Ralph Helm who carried buckets of water to pour on dropping cinders, and when he ran out of water, stamped out fire with his bare feet.

Within 10 days of the 1886 fire, reconstruction efforts started, this time using fireproof brick, Dumermuth wrote.

Visalia lucky?

In Visalia, according to a history written by Visalia Fire Department, unlike the majority of pioneer California cities, the city never had a truly disastrous fire.

Visalia’s first serious fire occurred in November 1867, when the Exchange Hotel on Main Street, where The Palace was later located, burned to the ground.

That fire directly led to the formation of Visalia's first fire engine company: Eclipse Engine Co. No. 1.

In September 1891, one of Visalia's worst fires occurred, according to the Visalia Fire Department history. Scott Hayes' Kaweah Livery Stable caught fire during the Admission Day celebration and burned to the ground, killing 23 horses.

One of the worst months for costly fires in Visalia was June 1922.

On the night of June 2, the Visalia Planing Mill burned down with a loss of $45,000.

Two weeks later, while workers were getting the old Visalia Cannery on East Oak street ready for the apricot harvest, it caught fire. The loss was $250,000.

The Planing Mill also burned down in 1933 and 1936. Today, it's a popular pizza restaurant.

Visalia's Versailles ablaze

Arguably the Visalia-Tulare area's most notorious fire was the December 2000 blaze that destroyed an unfinished $2.5 million, 25,000-square-foot mansion that was modeled after the French Palace of Versailles. Investigators later ruled the fire was arson.

The wrinkle: The gargantuan house was detested by neighbors and was the focus of a long (and unsuccessful) legal battle by city officials to stop the project. The mansion was near completion when it burned to the ground.

The aftermath of the fire led to lawsuits and the resignation of the Visalia Fire Chief Carlos Rodriguez, who was one of the mansion's prospective neighbors. His wife was openly critical of the house and one of the leaders of the neighborhood's efforts to stop construction.

After the fire, Rodriguez was relieved of responsibility for investigating the blaze, which was a factor in his later resignation.

The suspected Visalia Versailles arsonist was never caught.

A culinary tragedy

The December 2018 downtown Visalia blaze— which destroyed beloved restaurants Cafe 225 and Mamma K's Diner and put dozens of people out of work— also has to make any list of important fires in the Tulare-Visalia area.

The blaze, which was reported around 1 a.m. the day after Christmas, started in the attic of Mama K's and spread to Cafe 225.

The fire left a gaping hole in the heart of downtown Visalia, directly across from the Visalia Fox Theatre.

Mama K's moved out of downtown Visalia to North Ben Maddox Way. Cafe 225 has no plans to reopen.

Currently, the former home of Mama K's and Cafe 225 is an empty lot.

Visalia-Tulare areas top fires

James Ward covers entertainment, news, sports and lifestyles for the Visalia Times-Delta/Tulare Advance-Register. Follow him on Twitter. Get alerts and keep up on all things Tulare County for as little as $1 a month. Subscribe today.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.