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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Turlock, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

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Latest News in Turlock, CA

Turlock school board member’s colleagues voted unanimously to sue him, records show

Six Turlock Unified School District trustees voted in January to sue fellow school board member Jeffrey Cortinas, the only board member not present for the vote, according to records newly obtained by The Bee.The lawsuit aimed to force Cortinas to wear a mask at board meetings or attend remotely after he repeatedly did not comply with the state’s public health rules then in effect. The school board and district ...

Six Turlock Unified School District trustees voted in January to sue fellow school board member Jeffrey Cortinas, the only board member not present for the vote, according to records newly obtained by The Bee.

The lawsuit aimed to force Cortinas to wear a mask at board meetings or attend remotely after he repeatedly did not comply with the state’s public health rules then in effect. The school board and district dropped the lawsuit in March, one month after filing it and the day after California officials announced that mask requirements for K-12 schools would lift.

District officials previously did not respond to questions about when and how the school board decided to pursue the lawsuit. Through a Public Records Act request, The Bee learned the vote was taken during closed session at a special board meeting Jan. 12, a Wednesday. The school board holds regular meetings on Tuesday evenings.

School boards may discuss legal matters in closed session, meaning the public cannot attend. However, boards are required to mention on a public agenda any litigation they’ll discuss in closed session, and they must publicly report certain actions taken.

An agenda shared with The Bee in response to the records request was printed Jan. 7, suggesting the board considered legal action within a week of canceling a meeting just before it was supposed to begin.

The school district later blamed Cortinas for that meeting’s cancellation, saying in court documents that he refused to wear a mask or alternative face shield and drape and would not participate from a separate room. The board met virtually from Jan. 10 until March 15.

Meeting minutes show all trustees except Cortinas were present for the closed session Jan. 12 and voted to initiate legal action. Cortinas was present for about an hour and 15 minutes of the more than two-hour-long public meeting that followed, according to the minutes.

This story was originally published April 5, 2022 5:00 AM.

Report makes case to provide unemployment benefits for undocumented workers

UC MercedTens of thousands of undocumented immigrant workers in California could receive aid from an unemployment benefit system if the state approves the program. UC Merced's Community and Labor Center (CLC) has published a report that examines the need for the system.Approximately 17.1 million people make up the ...

UC Merced

Tens of thousands of undocumented immigrant workers in California could receive aid from an unemployment benefit system if the state approves the program. UC Merced's Community and Labor Center (CLC) has published a report that examines the need for the system.

Approximately 17.1 million people make up the state's workforce, and it's estimated that 1.1 million of them are undocumented immigrants. In other words, roughly 6.4% of California workers, or about 1 in 16 workers, is undocumented and therefore excluded from the federal unemployment insurance system.

"California is the world's fifth-largest economy, yet over a million of its workers lack eligibility for the most basic safety net provision: unemployment benefits. AB 2847 is an important step in modernizing the safety net for California workers on the front lines of the global economy and major disasters," said sociology Professor Edward Flores, with the CLC.

Assembly Bill 2847, introduced by Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia (D-Coachella), would establish the Excluded Workers Pilot Program until Jan. 1, 2025. Administered by the Labor and Workforce Development Agency, the program would provide income assistance to excluded workers who are unemployed and not eligible for state or federal benefits administered by the Employment Development Department.

An investment of $597 million could provide $300 in weekly benefits for 20 weeks to roughly 140,000 unemployed undocumented workers in California.

Studies have shown that economic aid is an important tool that safeguards the health and wellbeing of workers and their families during a public health crisis, such as with the COVID-19 pandemic. Citizen workers have been able to access economic aid without exclusions, and these economic assistance programs that provide workers with relief can mitigate fear and risk of retaliation—including having their hours reduced or being fired—if they file a report against employers not following workplace health and safety standards.

According to the report, undocumented workers play a key role in California's economy by generating $3.7 billion in state and local tax revenues. However, these same workers face far greater levels of economic insecurity: 38% of noncitizen workers earn below a "living wage" compared to 18% of citizen workers. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Living Wage Calculator shows for California as a whole, the living wage for one adult with no kids is $18.66 an hour. More than 6 in 10 children living in noncitizen worker households live below a living wage, compared with 36% of children in citizen worker households.

The pandemic revealed several longstanding workplace inequities. Analyses show that a relationship exists between the lack of access to unemployment benefits and industry-level pandemic deaths. Workers in eight of the industries with the highest pandemic-era increases in workplace deaths had low rates of unemployment benefits usage (less than 25%) and high rates of in-person work (more than 80%). And in the first year of the pandemic, California unemployed citizen workers were eligible for up to 20 times as much economic aid as unemployed undocumented workers ($35,000 vs. $1,700 respectively).

Groups of demonstrators have traveled to the state Capitol to rally in support of the proposed pilot program. They point to existing initiatives in states such as Oregon and New York as models for state-funded benefit programs that replace undocumented immigrant workers' lost wages. The bill, which also has the support of eight legislative co-authors, continues to make its way through the state Legislature.

Turlock Amazon center to open in 2022

Online retail giant giant Amazon officially announced on Wednesday that the company’s newest fulfillment center is well underway in Turlock, bringing over 1,000 jobs to the region.The leased building is currently under construction on Fulkerth Road behind Dust Bowl Brewing Co. just off Highway 99, and when completed it will span 1,080,308 square feet. According to Amazon, the new warehouse will open in 2022 and serve as a fulfillment center where products enter the warehouse, are stored, purchased online, packed and shipped. In ...

Online retail giant giant Amazon officially announced on Wednesday that the company’s newest fulfillment center is well underway in Turlock, bringing over 1,000 jobs to the region.

The leased building is currently under construction on Fulkerth Road behind Dust Bowl Brewing Co. just off Highway 99, and when completed it will span 1,080,308 square feet. According to Amazon, the new warehouse will open in 2022 and serve as a fulfillment center where products enter the warehouse, are stored, purchased online, packed and shipped. In short, it’s where Amazon orders will be fulfilled.

“The many hundreds of jobs that Amazon will create in Turlock are important to our city and region. We appreciate Amazon’s truly significant investment in the Turlock Regional Industrial Park and their utilization of our streamlined approval process to create both year-around and seasonal jobs which provide both kinds of job opportunities in our community,” Turlock’s acting City Manager Sarah Eddy said.

According to Eddy, Amazon paid all development impact fees prior to receiving a building permit and, in accordance with the City’s Master Plan and General Plan standards, will be required to widen Fulkerth Road along the project frontage and install a traffic signal at the Fulkerth Road and Tegner Road intersection prior to occupying the building.

Amazon dedicated 35 feet of additional right of way along Fulkerth Road to widen the southern side of the road, Eddy said, as well as along the frontage of 3130 Fulkerth Rd. Additionally, the proposed warehouse use is not a high water user and is not expected to put a strain on Turlock’s water supply.

The warehouse is just the latest addition to Turlock’s ever-expanding industrial park.

“With Amazon’s high brand identification, we certainly hope it increases interest in the Turlock Regional Industrial Park,” Eddy said. “But we’ve found consistently high interest in the park since the City first spearheaded the streamlined approval approach utilized there.”

The Turlock fulfillment center is one of Amazon’s latest projects in California, where the company has invested $81 billion since 2010. The new warehouse will add 1,000 more jobs to the 150,000 jobs Amazon has already provided throughout the state, which typically pay at least $15 per hour to start.

“This addition will definitely be felt,” City Councilmember Andrew Nosrati said. “1,000 employees coming into our city on a daily basis has the potential to stimulate much of our local economy, however this paces even more urgency for this Council to act on the housing crisis that will most certainly be exacerbated.”

Turlock Mayor Amy Bublak said that despite California’s reputation as anti-business, the industrial park’s wide variety of production plants show that Turlock is an exception. Amazon will join the likes of Blue Diamond Growers, U.S. Cold Storage and Valley Milk, to name a few.

“Who wouldn’t be thrilled to add Amazon’s name recognition to the top-tier companies that have chosen the Turlock Regional Industrial Park as home for multimillion dollar facilities with job opportunities?” Bublak said. “California is a difficult climate for new businesses, but this City Council is committed to making Turlock a thriving location to create or expand businesses.”

Softball travels for Tournament of Champions, wins three of five games

Over the weekend CWU softball finished the 19th annual Tournament of Champions with a 3-2 record. The tournament was held in Turlock, California hosted by Stanislaus State University.On Friday, April 1, the tournament started with a 2-1 win over San Francisco State University (SFSU). Senior pitcher Rhaney Harris (7-7) pitched all seven innings holding SFSU to one run on five hits and striking out three.The Wildcat’s offense had 10 hits and multiple chances to score, but were unable to capitalize until the bottom of the se...

Over the weekend CWU softball finished the 19th annual Tournament of Champions with a 3-2 record. The tournament was held in Turlock, California hosted by Stanislaus State University.

On Friday, April 1, the tournament started with a 2-1 win over San Francisco State University (SFSU). Senior pitcher Rhaney Harris (7-7) pitched all seven innings holding SFSU to one run on five hits and striking out three.

The Wildcat’s offense had 10 hits and multiple chances to score, but were unable to capitalize until the bottom of the seventh. After two straight flyouts to begin the inning junior outfielder Allie Theissen was able to reach on an error by SFSU second baseman.

Freshman utility player Riana Abeshima came in to pinch run for Theissen and was able to make it to third on a double hit by sophomore utility player Brooke Jordan. Senior outfielder Keegan Wise came into pinch run and both her and Abeshmia came in to score the tying and winning runs on a two run single by junior catcher Alyssa Benthagen.

Following the walk-off, CWU wasn’t able to ride the momentum in the second game on friday, losing 1-0 to Biola University.

Senior pitcher Isabel Womack (5-5) pitched all six innings giving up just one run on three hits while striking out four. However, Biola University pitching held CWU to five hits while striking out eight.

The Wildcats had a chance in the second with a two out double by sophomore infielder Makenna King, but sophomore outfielder Jillian Hampson struck out to end the threat.

CWU had another chance in the fifth when with two outs a single and a walk put runners on first and second. However, Theissen fouled out to the left fielder to end the inning.

Biola scored their run in the bottom of the fifth when after two singles put runners on first and third, a fielder’s choice RBI allowed the go ahead run to score.

On day two of the tournament, the Wildcats once again won one and lost one. In the first game they were able to beat Azusa Pacific University (APU) 4-2.

Harris once again pitched the entire game giving up six hits and two runs while walking one and striking out two. She got a little help from her bats this time around.

In the third inning, freshman outfielder Karsyn Decker started the inning with a single to left field. She then stole second and after a walk by junior infielder Harlee Carpenter advanced to third on a bunt single by Theissen.

After a fielder’s choice that had Decker thrown out at home and a foul out that couldn’t advance the runners, a wild pitch allowed Carpenter to score the first run of the game.

CWU scored again in the fourth. After two straight groundouts, sophomore infielder Taylor Kai hit a single. After Decker was safe because of an error that put runners on first and second, Carpenter hit them both home to give CWU a 3-0 lead.

It remained that way until the seventh when after two straight groundouts, Thiessen hit a double. Sophomore utility player Brooke Jordan reached on an error which allowed Theissen to score and give CWU a 4-0 lead going to the bottom of the seventh.

Harris, who had been cruising throughout the game, struggled in the seventh giving up two runs and had the winning run at the plate. Harris collected herself and got the last two hitters to line out and strikeout respectively to preserve the 4-2 win.

The Wildcats went on to lose 7-5 to Dominican University (DU) to end the second day of the tournament. CWU took a quick 2-0 lead in the first inning thanks to a two run single by junior infielder Myiah Seaton.

DU tied it in the third due to a throwing error by Womack that allowed two runs to score. DU would then grab a 4-2 lead in the fifth thanks to a sacrifice fly and an RBI single.

The Wildcats cut into the lead in the bottom of the fifth. After two straight outs Theissen doubled and scored on a double by Jordan to cut the lead to 4-3.

CWU would take the lead in the sixth. After a single and a sacrifice bunt put the tying run at second base, freshman utility player Riana Abeshima reached on a throwing error which allowed the tying run to score. She would then score the go ahead run on a single by King to give a 5-4 lead going to the top of the seventh.

That’s when everything fell apart. After a strikeout of the leadoff batter DU got back to back singles to put runners on first and second. The next hitter hit a three run home run to give DU a 7-5 lead. CWU couldn’t make the comeback and lost 7-5.

CWU played their final game of the tournament on Sunday in which they beat California State University, East Bay 5-1.

Harris (9-7) once again through a complete game allowing one run on nine hits while walking one and striking out five.

The Wildcats got on the board in the first when Carpenter reached base on the very rare catcher interference. After a fielder’s choice and two errors had the bases loaded with two outs King came through with an RBI single to put CWU up 1-0.

CWU added to their lead in fifth. After three straight bunt singles loaded the bases, Benthagen hit a sacrifice fly to score Decker from third to make it 2-0. An RBI single from Seaton allowed Carpenter to score to make it 3-0.

CWU put the dagger in this game in the bottom of the sixth when Carpenter hit a two-run triple to make the game 5-0.

Harris allowed one run in the seventh but closed it out for the 5-1 victory.

CWU (15-17) will travel to Saint Martin’s University for a four game series starting on Saturday, April 9.

Grateful Dead’s Europe ’72 Tour 50th Anniversary: April 8 – Wembley, England

In April 1972, the Grateful Dead embarked on their now-legendary Europe ’72 Tour. The band performed 22 times between April 7 and May 26, resulting in the landmark triple live LP, Europe ’72 that was released in October of that year. To celebrate the legacy of the band’s historic tour abroad, JamBase presents a retrospective look back at each of the Europe 1972 Grateful Dead performances.The seco...

In April 1972, the Grateful Dead embarked on their now-legendary Europe ’72 Tour. The band performed 22 times between April 7 and May 26, resulting in the landmark triple live LP, Europe ’72 that was released in October of that year. To celebrate the legacy of the band’s historic tour abroad, JamBase presents a retrospective look back at each of the Europe 1972 Grateful Dead performances.

The second show of the Grateful Dead’s Europe 1972 tour was also the band’s second straight night at Empire Pool in Wembley, England (currently called OVO Arena Wembley). Prior to the start of the concert, tour manager Sam Cutler addressed the audience to have them tell their friends that were shut out of the sold-out concert that Dead’s upcoming performance on May 16 in Luxembourg would be broadcast live on Radio Luxembourg.

Like each Europe ’72 performance, the Saturday, April 8 show saw keyboardist Ron “Pigpen” McKernan front the band on “Mr. Charlie” while guitarist Bob Weir and vocalist Donna Jean Godchaux showcased an expansive “Playing In The Band.” Both instances occurred in the first set, which began with guitarist Jerry Garcia leading the first of eight “Bertha” first set openers of the tour.

Stalling for time to fix a broken string onstage, Weir also told the notorious “Yellow Dog” joke during the opening set, after the version of “Cumberland Blues” that was selected for the original Europe ’72 live album (that was polished with studio vocal overdubs). The first set “Looks Like Rain,” one of three performed on the Europe ‘72 Tour, saw a rare occurrence of Garcia utilizing a pedal steel guitar.

As it had the night prior, and would a total of 15 times on the tour, “Casey Jones” closed the first set. This was one of five shows on the tour that saw first sets open with “Bertha” and close with “Casey Jones.”

In a similar fashion to opening night, Bobby introduced the second set opening “Truckin’” telling the audience:

“Alrighty, we’re gonna start this set off, once again, just like last night, with a song that rose straight to the top of the charts in Turlock, California. Now, this was number one. Numero uno … I can’t stress that point enough.”

Garcia, noting the overlap, called Weir on it by telling him, “that’s just like you did last night, man.”

Despite its apparent popularity, Bobby struggled a bit with some of the opener’s lyrics. The rest of the six-song second set was anchored by a 32-minute, psychedelic “Dark Star” that had elements hinting at “Feelin’ Groovy” and a “Mind Left Body” jam.

“Dark Star” then segued sweetly into “Sugar Magnolia.” Pigpen also led Weir, Garcia, keyboardist Keith Godchaux, drummer Bill Kreutzmann and bassist Phil Lesh on a wild, harmonica-infused, 19-minute “Caution (Do Not Step On Tracks).”

For the second straight night, but this time actually on Saturday night, the encore was “One More Saturday Night.” Weir namechecked “Mr. Garcia” ahead of his bandmate’s blistering solo.

Here are additional statistics and information regarding the second show of the Grateful Dead’s Europe ’72 tour:

Below, stream the official recording of the Grateful Dead’s April 8, 1972 concert at Empire Pool in Wembley, England or check out additional recordings via Archive.org:

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