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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Tranquillity, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

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Review: Emily St. John Mandel gets back to the future

By Emily St. John Mandel Knopf: 272 pages, $25If you buy books linked on our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores.There is a small moment in Emily St. John Mandel’s new novel, “...

By Emily St. John Mandel Knopf: 272 pages, $25

If you buy books linked on our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores.

There is a small moment in Emily St. John Mandel’s new novel, “Sea of Tranquility,” that you might miss: A man recalls, from his childhood, a moment when his mother glanced at a photo of the “Earth Ocean” while stirring soup. Four centuries from now, their family lives on Colony One, a human-engineered city with a manufactured river but no seas or oceans.

This man, Gaspery-Jacques Roberts, has private fixations of his own. He may be mysteriously connected to someone who lived many years ago, or at least to her imagination. Novelist Olive Llewellyn included a character named Gaspery in her smash-hit bestseller “Marienbad,” which was released in the 23rd century.

Llewellyn, in another section, is haunted by the success of “Marienbad,” a dystopian novel she wrote on the brink of an actual pandemic. The parallel to Mandel herself, who is also the married mother of a young daughter, has to be intentional. Mandel was virtually hailed as a prophet — a designation she disliked — after her pandemic-dystopian 2014 bestseller, “Station Eleven,” was adapted into a hit HBO Max miniseries just in time for COVID-19.

Llewellyn too plays the reluctant seer. One of the novel’s most affecting sections unfolds as she realizes her suspicions about a coming virus were correct; she cancels the rest of her book tour and heads home, weeping along the way, stripping off her likely contaminated clothes on the sidewalk.

“Sea of Tranquility” might be Mandel’s “pandemic novel” in the sense that it’s the one she wrote over the last two years, but it documents a different kind of human glitch. As the story opens, a young British man, Edwin St. Andrew, experiences a strange suite of sensory events in 1912 in a Canadian forest, where he meets a man named — yes — Gaspery Roberts.

Mandel knows how to brew a story. As Edwin, Gaspery and other people scattered across time — a teenager named Vincent, an aging violinist named Alan Sami — all experience similar visions, we settle in for a juicy sci-fi ride, replete with time travel, lunar colonies and robot landscapers. But Mandel is less concerned with the mechanics of science fiction than with using its tropes to chart new courses through human relationships and their consequences.

At the farthest edge of “Sea of Tranquility’s” time frame, it’s the turn of the 25th century, Gaspery’s native “present.” He is looking for new employment, and his sister Zoey works for the mysterious and powerful Time Institute. The concept of time travel has been widely accepted, and its bylaws call back to the most familiar sci-fi (from Ray Bradbury to “Back to the Future”): Don’t tell anyone about your mission. Don’t stand out. Don’t interfere with a person’s life, even to save it.

The book jumps across time with impunity, following an internal map that will make exquisite sense at the end and only at the end. Its middle expands on Gaspery’s life, taking him from a listless 20-something to a somewhat unconvincing new candidate at the Time Institute. We’re meant to believe Zoey uses her influence to get her brother the position, but it’s difficult to understand why he wants it so badly.

That’s a small quibble to make of a novel that is pure pleasure to read. “Sea of Tranquility” isn’t “Station Eleven.” It also isn’t “The Glass Hotel.” Mandel stans might already surmise that the Vincent named here is Vincent Alkaitis of “Hotel”; he and Mirella Kessler have roles to play, although the connection between the novels is more conceptual than narrative. That’s to the good because, in retrospect, “Hotel” feels like a step backward, “Tranquility” a giant leap.

After the initial trauma of lockdown, it seems Mandel has unlocked the sense of play and puzzle-making that shimmered in her earliest work (for example, the etymological fun in “Last Night in Montreal”). Following Gaspery as he travels across time may remind you of the best passages in Ben H. Winters’ work or, even better, Ursula K. Le Guin’s.

Yet, as in “Station Eleven,” Mandel is far more interested in human psychology than world-building. Witness Gaspery’s eventual undoing — where he winds up, what he does with his life. This brave new world is built on technology but still leaves room for old traditions — for violin lessons and, still more improbably, long attention spans. The Time Institute has its plans for humanity, but it hasn’t (yet) figured out how to control every individual psyche. People can still find wormholes with its wormholes to pursue their own ends — which can be as simple as helping a loved one or as complex as an ambition to save the world. If art is what survives in “Station Eleven,” here it is free will.

Of course, Mandel is too smart, and the rest of us too scarred by the past couple of years, to buy into any Utopia. She reserves her greatest scorn for the bureaucrats of the Time Institute. “What you have to understand is that bureaucracy is an organism,” Zoey tells Gaspery. “And the prime goal of every organism is self-protection. Bureaucracy exists to protect itself.” Is this a Canadian thing? (Mandel grew up in Quebec.) U.S. citizens have no love lost on bureaucrats, but they don’t generally hang the evils of the world on them.

Maybe we should. Mandel’s writing on bureaucracy recalls the functionaries in the movie “Brazil,” the dwarves of Gringotts in the “Harry Potter” series and the government employees in the TV series “Counterpart.” They’re competitive, malevolent and paranoid. One of the book’s last aha moments involves Gaspery realizing someone from the Time Institute has been manipulating Llewellyn all along — a dark but also funny comment on the machinations of modern book publishing.

Which returns us to Gaspery’s memory of the “Earth Ocean.” For all their water features, the colonies cannot replace the wonder of nature — the dark green forests and deep blue seas. More than one character has family “back on Earth”; Llewellyn’s parents chose to retire there.

Following a superb stylist like Mandel is like watching an expert lacemaker at work: You see the strands and later the beautiful results, but your eyes simply cannot follow what comes in between. As in her best work, including “Station Eleven,” she is less concerned with endings than with continuity. In “Sea of Tranquility,” her vision is not quite as bleak, but it is as strong — I won’t say prophetic — as ever.

California Artist Transforms Popular Art Gallery Into Breathtaking Event Venue

(MENAFN- EIN Presswire)Thomas Studios' patio with ocean viewsThomas Studios event venue interior roomThomas Studios interior roomRenowned coastal-inspired wood Artist, Shaun Thomas, is excited to announce the opening of Thomas Studios Event SpaceLAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, October 28, 2022 / / -- Now available to rent for both private and intimate events, , is based in the heart of , California. Boasting ocean views among a privat...

(MENAFN- EIN Presswire)

Thomas Studios' patio with ocean views

Thomas Studios event venue interior room

Thomas Studios interior room

Renowned coastal-inspired wood Artist, Shaun Thomas, is excited to announce the opening of Thomas Studios Event Space

LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA, UNITED STATES, October 28, 2022 / / -- Now available to rent for both private and intimate events, , is based in the heart of , California. Boasting ocean views among a private patio, intimate and contemporary rooms and a unique gallery of art, the public are now invited to book this one-of-a-kind venue for their very own special occasion.

Launching with a surprisingly affordable booking rate, the venue is perfect for corporate events, company meetings, holiday parties, fundraising events, birthdays, baby showers, networking events, intimate weddings and so much more.

After seeing huge success with Thomas Studios as an Art Gallery for a number of years, Owner and Artist Shaun Thomas decided to open up bookings for the venue to the public.

'The past few years of hosting my own artwork events, events for personal friends, as well as positive feedback from gallery visitors, I quickly realized how much everyone truly enjoyed their time and how the space enhanced each occasion. It's because of this unique charm, style and appeal, that I decided to formally open it to the public for private rentals.' - Shaun Thomas

“From artwork to interior spaces, bringing any type of vision to life fascinates me. I've owned the gallery for a few years now, after first discovering the old vacant space back in 2018. Since then, I've followed my ongoing vision of transforming the space into an Art Gallery based on modern tranquillity.” - Shaun Thomas

Specializing in , Shaun Thomas' simplistic and minimalistic artistic style is not only reflected through his artwork but throughout the interior of the gallery as well. One of his collectors put it best, describing his gallery as an“oasis of style and harmony.”

Nestled along pacific coast highway in popular downtown Laguna Beach, the gallery's elevated location on the second story gives the venue a private and exclusive feel. Every booking includes an Event Coordinator to help ensure each event runs smoothly.

Thomas Studios has launched the venue bookings in 2022 with reduced priced packages starting from $125 per hour with a maximum capacity of 50 people.

Shaun Thomas Thomas Studios +1 949-274-9023

Visit us on social media:

Thomas Studios Art Gallery | Event Venue Space

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SSFL 2022: “Pres”, Benedict’s start Intercol campaigns in Mahaica, CIC host Miracle Ministries in Big 5

Defending National Intercol champions, Presentation College (San Fernando), and 2022 Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) Big 4 conquerors, St Benedict’s College, will open their 2022 Intercol campaigns in Mahaica Oval double header on Thursday 10 November.Both Premier Division schools join the fray at the South Zone quarterfinal stage, according to fixtures released today by the SSFL executive committee.Presentation College, who were defeated Big 4 semifinalists, face the winner between Point Fortin East Secondary an...

Defending National Intercol champions, Presentation College (San Fernando), and 2022 Secondary Schools Football League (SSFL) Big 4 conquerors, St Benedict’s College, will open their 2022 Intercol campaigns in Mahaica Oval double header on Thursday 10 November.

Both Premier Division schools join the fray at the South Zone quarterfinal stage, according to fixtures released today by the SSFL executive committee.

Presentation College, who were defeated Big 4 semifinalists, face the winner between Point Fortin East Secondary and Fyzabad Anglican Secondary from 5pm at Mahaica Oval. And St Benedict’s open the Mahaica Oval double feature against either Ste Madeline Secondary or Princes Town West Secondary from 3pm.

The 2022 Intercol competition actually kicks off in the North Zone with St Mary’s College amongst six teams who are in action in the preliminary round on Tuesday 1 November.

St Mary’s College, who recently copped the North Zone Championship title, play Diego Martin Central from 3.30pm on Mucurapo Road.

Before the “Saints” join the knockout competition, there is the far from inconsequential matter of the SSFL Big 5 competition—which will decide the three second tier schools to be promoted to the 2023 Premier Division.

St Mary’s College hosts Central champs Miracle Ministries High School from 3pm on Saturday 29 October while South Zone winners Siparia West Secondary are at home against East Zone champions Arima North Secondary.

The Tobago representative, which is still to be decided, is on a bye.

At present, Bishop’s High School top the group with Mason Hall Secondary in second place—as the latter outfit were awarded three points today after their trip to Pentecostal Light and Life was abandoned due to an inadequately marked playing field.

According to the Tobago Zone’s rules, the top two finishers will meet in a playoff to determine the zonal champion—which is a consequence of a belated decision to condense the competition from two rounds to just one.

Mason Hall will now challenge Bishop’s High for the right to represent Tobago in the Big 5 competition and, ultimately, to join Speyside High School in the 2023 Premier Division.

The SSFL has decided to play only the first round of the Big 5 competition with the other four rounds postponed until all of the participating teams are eliminated from the National Intercol competition.

The uncertainty over Big 5 match days, according to the SSFL, is due to inter-island travel issues resulting from the Tobago Carnival.

At present, Merere Gonzales is president of the SSFL alongside general secretary Azaad Khan.

Big 5 fixtures

(Sat 29 Oct)

St Mary’s College vs Miracle Ministries High, 3pm, Serpentine Road;

Siparia West Secondary vs Arima North Secondary, 3pm, Siparia West;

Tobago are on a bye

(To be determined)

Arima North Secondary vs Miracle Ministries High at Arima Old Road;

St Mary’s College vs Tobago at Serpentine Road;

Siparia West Secondary are on a bye

(To be determined)

Tobago vs Siparia West Secondary at Tobago;

Arima North Secondary vs St Mary’s College at Arima Old Road;

Miracle Ministries are on a bye

(To be determined)

Miracle Ministries High vs Tobago at TBA;

Siparia West Secondary vs St Mary’s College at Siparia West;

Arima North Secondary are on a bye

(To be determined)

Miracle Ministries vs Siparia West Secondary at TBA;

Tobago vs Arima North Secondary at Tobago;

St Mary’s College are on a bye

Intercol

Preliminary Round

(Tue 1 Nov)

St Mary’s College v Diego Martin Central, North Zone, 3.30pm, Fatima ground;

Trinity College (Moka) v Tranquillity Secondary, North Zone, 3.30pm, St Mary’s ground;

Mucurapo West Secondary v Blanchisseuse Secondary, North Zone, 3.30pm, QRC;

(Wed 2 Nov)

Five Rivers Secondary v Holy Cross College, East Zone, 3.30pm, St Augustine;

(Thu 3 Nov)

Point Fortin East v Fyzabad Anglican Sec, South Zone, 3.30pm, Pt Fortin;

Ste Madeline Secondary v Princes Town West, South Zone, 3.30pm, Moruga;

Zonal Quarterfinals

(Fri 4 Nov)

Fatima College v Mucurapo West/ Blanchisseuse, North Zone, 3.30pm, St Mary’s ground;

QRC v Trinity (Moka)/ Tranquillity, North Zone, 3.30pm, Fatima ground;

East Mucurapo Secondary v St Anthony’s College, North Zone, 2pm, Hasely Crawford Stadium;

Malick Secondary v St Mary’s/ D’go Martin Central, North Zone, 4pm, Hasely Crawford Stadium;

(Mon 7 Nov)

Miracle Ministries High v ASJA Boys (Charlieville), Central Zone, 3.30pm, Arena Recreation Ground;

Presentation College (Chag) v Couva East Sec, Central Zone, 3.30pm, Couva East;

Speyside High v Championship #7, Tobago Zone, 3pm, Dwight Yorke Stadium;

Championship #3 v Championship #4, Tobago Zone, 5pm, Dwight Yorke Stadium;

Championship #2 v Championship #5, Tobago Zone, TBA;

Championship #1 v Championship #6, Tobago Zone, TBA;

(Wed 9 Nov)

San Juan North v Five Rivers/ Holy Cross, East Zone, 3.30pm, St Augustine;

St Augustine Secondary v Manzanilla Secondary, East Zone, 3.30pm, El Dorado;

Trinity College East v Valencia Secondary, East Zone, 1.30pm, Larry Gomes Stadium;

Arima North Secondary v El Dorado East, East Zone, 3.30pm, Larry Gomes Stadium;

(Thu 10 Nov)

St Benedict’s College v St Madeline/ P Town West, South Zone, 3pm, Mahaica Oval;

Presentation College (San F’do) v Pt Fortin E/ Fyzabad Angl, South Zone, 5pm, Mahaica Oval;

Naparima College v Siparia West Secondary, South Zone, 3pm, Moruga,

Pleasantville Secondary v Moruga Secondary, South Zone, 5pm, Moruga.

Disconnect to reconnect: Friends open eco-friendly resort in rural New Brunswick

Ashley Ward and Katie Carson have carved out a little piece of tranquillity on a hillside deep in the heart of Albert County, about a 30-minute drive from downtown Moncton, N.B.The Hope-Wellness Eco-Resort is located in Edgetts Landing in the tourism corridor between the villages of Hillsborough and Alma.The best friends and business partners came up with the idea one night over a glass of wine, and around two years ago, bought the land in a heavily wooded area and built it from scratch."We really underestimated how...

Ashley Ward and Katie Carson have carved out a little piece of tranquillity on a hillside deep in the heart of Albert County, about a 30-minute drive from downtown Moncton, N.B.

The Hope-Wellness Eco-Resort is located in Edgetts Landing in the tourism corridor between the villages of Hillsborough and Alma.

The best friends and business partners came up with the idea one night over a glass of wine, and around two years ago, bought the land in a heavily wooded area and built it from scratch.

"We really underestimated how much work it would be," said Carson. "Pulling brush, cutting trees, staining the units, everything. We really had no idea."

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She says the inspiration came from glamping trips they enjoyed together but thought something was missing, like a communal gathering area.

"Everything was so lovely, but after a certain amount of time, we wanted to go meet people as you would at a resort down south. So, we kind of figured why don't we do something that's a little different and have a lounge area," said Carson.

The nordic style spa is an adults-only resort with five cabins, a sauna, a yoga dome and a bar with local beer and wine for grown-ups to getaway.

"Parents need a vacation," said Ward. "We have children of our own. We just thought it would be nice for people to have a little escape into nature. Disconnect to reconnect -- that's our motto."

Ward and Carson worked in the hospitality and tourism industry together for about 12 years and did everything from serving tables to restaurant and hotel management to working for an airline.

"We always talked about doing something like this. Never thought we'd actually do it together, but I'm really happy that we did," said Ward. "We both lost our jobs during COVID. We both worked for Porter Airlines and when COVID hit, obviously no planes were going out, so we said it's time we actually pursued our dreams."

The goal was to create a greener experience while still providing the luxury of being at a four-season resort.

"We love Hillsborough, we love the area," said Carson. "We really want to make it not just a stopover town on the way to Alma, but somewhere where people can come and stay right here in the area and take advantage of the tourism here and all the beautiful artisans they can go visit."

The resort doesn't officially open until Jan. 2, but bookings can be placed online now.

There's also a night market on Nov. 19.

A pool and lounge area at the Hope-Wellness Eco-Resort in Edgetts Landing, N.B. (Derek Haggett/CTV)

How to Smudge Your Home: Removing Negative Energy With Indigenous Peoples’ Medicinal Plants

As more people lean towards spirituality and the power of positive energy, Indigenous peoples’ spiritual practice of smudging has become more mainstream. We sat with Angela DeMontigny, a native Canadian fashion designer of Cree-Métis heritage and the creator of LODGE Soy Candles, to learn more about how to properly participate in smudging and incorporate other Indigenous wellness practices into your home.The first thing to know about smudging, commonly referred to as the practice of burning sage, is that Indigenous people...

As more people lean towards spirituality and the power of positive energy, Indigenous peoples’ spiritual practice of smudging has become more mainstream. We sat with Angela DeMontigny, a native Canadian fashion designer of Cree-Métis heritage and the creator of LODGE Soy Candles, to learn more about how to properly participate in smudging and incorporate other Indigenous wellness practices into your home.

The first thing to know about smudging, commonly referred to as the practice of burning sage, is that Indigenous people see the natural world as their pharmacy. “Everything we need for our health is grown on Mother Earth,” Angela explains. “Our knowledge about the healing properties of plants has been passed down from our ancestors for generations.”

As explained in the province of Manitoba’s Smudging Protocol and Guidelines by the Indigenous Inclusion Directorate, smudging is a tradition common to many First Nations that involves burning one or more medicines from the Earth. “The forms of smudging will vary from nation to nation but are considered by all to be a way of cleansing oneself,” the report states. Indigenous nations use different medicines depending on where they live. Sweetgrass, sage, and cedar are some of the most common medicines used in First Nations’ smudge ceremonies.

Angela has always seen smudging as an important spiritual practice. “Smudging is one of the easiest things you can do to change the energy in your space. It removes spirits and negative energies from your home, which can impact your physical and mental health,” she says, adding that it’s been passed down by her ancestors for millennia.

Related: Is Home Your Happy Place? Here’s How to Organize Your Home to Support Mental Wellness

“Sage is one of the most grounding oil that calms the nervous system and balances your hormones. It activates intuition, wisdom, tranquillity, contentment, self-love and sexuality. Sweetgrass also has similar healing properties,” Angela explains.

As reported in the Smudging Protocol and Guidelines, “the act of clearing the air, mind, spirit, and emotions may be accomplished in a variety of ways, but, according to First Nations’ practice, a smudge is led by a person who has an understanding of what a smudge is and why it is done.”

If you want to smudge your home, Angela recommends starting at your local Indigenous Canadian community centre. They’ll likely be able to find an elder that can help. In fact, a lot of work goes into proper smudging rituals, which can take several hours when done properly.

“For example, you’re moving into a new home and want to remove negative energy. In that case, you need to smudge in a very systematic way. You must open every space in your home: every drawer, closet door, and place where negative energy can hide. Smudging involves moving clockwise, starting from the east of your home.” Although Angela explains that you can use smudging for your physical and mental wellness like if you’re feeling anxious or want to smudge a small room, it’s only seen as temporary.

Similar to any spiritual or cultural practice, smudging must be treated with reverence. However, there’s a different layer to consider when it comes to Canada’s Indigenous history.

“It’s often forgotten that it was illegal for Indigenous people to perform ceremonies and use our medicines during the Indian Act,” Angela says. The Indian Act gave the Canadian government power over First Nations’ identity, governance and cultural practice from 1876 to 1985. “We would be jailed for something as simple as burning sage or sweetgrass. It’s also why buying something appropriated from Indigenous culture and selling it for profit is hurtful to many communities.”

It’s also essential to ensure that you buy sage from an authentic Indigenous brand or person. “When mainstream retailers sell things like smudging kits for your home, it becomes a commodity sold for profit,” Angela says. “There needs to be recognition of a Native American connection and importance of Indigenous cultural practices.”

Additionally, wild sage doesn’t grow back again when it’s over-picked. Buying sage from a non-ethical source might mean that you’re financially supporting the decontamination of essential medicine for Indigenous communities.

Using her knowledge of the healing properties that Mother Nature provides, Angela started making all-natural soy candles using Indigenous medicinal plants. Once the pandemic began, she realized it could help people calm their anxieties during a challenging time, and LODGE Candles was born.

One candle, called CEREMONY, was made to encapsulate the scent of being at a traditional Lodge ceremony when sitting beside a sacred fire. CEREMONY is made to enhance the mind, body and spirit and uses essential oils from cedar, sage, sweetgrass and tobacco.

CEREMONY, LODGE Soy Candles, $72.

Images courtesy of Getty Images, Unsplash and LODGE Soy Candles.

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