Appliance Repair in Squaw Valley, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Squaw Valley, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Squaw Valley, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Squaw Valley, CA

Alterra Mountain Co. Remains Committed to Stalled Development of Palisades Tahoe, CA

At a Town Hall meeting in Olympic Valley Saturday, Alterra Mountain Company doubled down on its stalled development project, promising to seek a new round of approvals for its massive Tahoe proposal in 2023.Alterra owns the resort now known as Palisades Tahoe, formerly Squaw Valley, including most of the land at the mountain base. Their massive Olympic Valley development proposal, first proposed in 2011, would remake Tahoe with a series of highrise condo and hotel buildings, a roller coaster, and an i...

At a Town Hall meeting in Olympic Valley Saturday, Alterra Mountain Company doubled down on its stalled development project, promising to seek a new round of approvals for its massive Tahoe proposal in 2023.

Alterra owns the resort now known as Palisades Tahoe, formerly Squaw Valley, including most of the land at the mountain base. Their massive Olympic Valley development proposal, first proposed in 2011, would remake Tahoe with a series of highrise condo and hotel buildings, a roller coaster, and an indoor waterpark.

Tahoe conservationists rallied around Sierra Watch and its campaign to Keep Squaw True, mounting a successful grassroots effort to stop Alterra’s proposed development and encourage responsible planning.

After years of public hearings, citizen advocacy, and legal challenges, Sierra Watch secured a court victory over Alterra’s project in 2021. The Third District Court of Appeals ruled that Placer County’s 2016 approvals violated state planning law, failing to adequately assess the project’s impacts on Lake Tahoe, fire danger, noise, and traffic.

The ruling put a halt to the project and sent Alterra back to the drawing board.

“Our hope is that Alterra will finally set aside its failed project and work on a collaborative plan for the future of Olympic Valley. Tahoe deserves no less.”

– Tom Mooers of Sierra Watch

At Saturday’s Town Hall, however, Alterra’s new lead developer, Jason Hansford, said they were seeking to address “deficiencies in the EIR” so they could apply for new approvals from Placer County “sometime next year.”

Palisades President Dee Byrne offered some tempering language, committing to “do development on the right scale.” But she reinforced that “we really do want to develop the Village” because she hears from visitors that there is not “enough to do” in Olympic Valley.

Other speakers at Saturday’s forum addressed specific issues facing Olympic Valley – each of which would be impacted by Alterra’s proposed development: fire danger and public safety, workforce housing and short-term rentals, Tahoe traffic and public transportation, and drought and water supply.

“The Town Hall was a great opportunity to come together and hear about pressing issues facing the Tahoe Sierra. We’re committed to applying that same spirit of togetherness to regional planning in order to ensure that any new development respects the timeless values of our mountains.”

– Tom Mooers

The Friends of Olympic Valley posted a recording of the Town Hall at: https://friendsofsv.org/olympic-valley-town-hall-meeting-video-may-29-2022/.

Palisades Tahoe Celebrates First Summer Season Under New Name

Guests will enjoy Pride Month activations, Washoe Tribe Cultural Tours, hiking, scenic Aerial Tram rides, and special events this seasonPalisades Tahoe returns for mountain exploration this summer season with outdoor adventure programming and family-friendly activities kicking off Friday, June 17.Uniting Legends: This summer, Palisades Tahoe is ...

Guests will enjoy Pride Month activations, Washoe Tribe Cultural Tours, hiking, scenic Aerial Tram rides, and special events this season

Palisades Tahoe returns for mountain exploration this summer season with outdoor adventure programming and family-friendly activities kicking off Friday, June 17.

Uniting Legends: This summer, Palisades Tahoe is preparing to offer a whole new experience for the upcoming winter season. Exciting enhancements are underway at both the Palisades and Alpine base areas. In addition to connecting the two legendary base areas with a 16-minute gondola ride, this construction season will also be marked by a replacement of the Red Dog lift, an expansion of the Funitel Plaza, and the installation of automatic snowmaking systems in three areas at Alpine. More information is available on our newly launched website.

Pride Month: In honor of Pride Month this June, Sunbowl will be offering $2 off the Rainbow Bowl, Starbucks will offer $1 off the Pink Drink and there will be an Over the Rainbow drink special at Rocker. Pride-themed merchandise will be available to purchase at retail stores, and The North Face location in The Village will be carrying a pride collection as well. Employees are encouraged to show their pride by wearing rainbow pins and putting their preferred pronouns on their nametags. Guests will also notice a number of decorations around the resort throughout the month of June, including flags and eye-catching Tram banners. Check out our latest Legends of Tahoe blog for a story on skier and queer community member, Jamie Burge.

Aerial Tram: Offering sweeping, panoramic views of Lake Tahoe and surrounding mountain vistas, the Aerial Tram is a 10-minute ride carrying passengers over 550 feet of creeks, waterfalls, and the iconic Tram Face, finally landing at High Camp, where visitors can access free activities. This summer, 2022/2023 Ikon pass holders can ride the tram free of charge, and ticket prices start at $39/adult and $29/child.

Beginning June 17, the Aerial Tram will operate daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Labor Day weekend, followed by weekend service from September 5 through September 30.

High Camp Activities: Situated at 8,200 ft. above sea level, High Camp at Palisades Tahoe is home to a variety of activities for all ages. With the purchase of an Aerial Tram ticket, guests receive complimentary access to geocaching, a playground, lawn games, Slacklines, Disc Golf, the High Camp Roller Rink, and North Face Guided Hikes. North Face Guided Hikes will be offered twice daily beginning on June 18. Meet at the High Camp lobby at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to join one of Palisades Tahoe’s experienced hiking guides for a scenic, 1.5-mile trail.

Back by popular demand and in partnership with the Washoe Tribe, Palisades Tahoe will once again be offering Cultural Tours throughout the summer. Join Herman Fillmore or Rhiana Jones of the Washoe Tribe at High Camp where they will share stories of Washoe history and culture from the Valley and surrounding mountains. Tours will be offered on June 24, July 15, July 29, August 12, and August 26. Attendees will meet outside of the Aerial Tram entrance by 9:15 a.m. This event is free, but attendees will need an Aerial Tram ticket or a 2022-2023 Ikon Pass. Aerial Tram tickets will be available for purchase and all ticket sales collected from the event will be donated to the Washoe Cultural Fund. Pre-registration is recommended and walk-ups will be permitted to join the group based on availability.

Other Seasonal Activities: The Sierra Nevada provides one of the most spectacular settings in the world, making Palisades Tahoe any hiker’s paradise. This summer, visitors can access a variety of hiking trails that lead to waterfalls, alpine lakes, meadows, peaks, and lookouts right from The Village at Palisades Tahoe base area or from Alpine Meadows Road. Plan your hike and check trail status on our website. Additionally, guests can start their day off right with a session at Palisades Yoga Studio or enjoy some family fun on The Ropes Course at Olympic Valley, which consists of 3 different towers with a mix of vertical climbing events, bridges, and zip lines. As a part of the resort’s larger renovation process, the pool and hot tub will be closed for the summer and the pool will remain closed permanently. Palisades Tahoe is evaluating future opportunities for High Camp.

Summer activities will also include bicycle rentals at Parallel (starting June 17), as well as a registration tent at the base area to sign up for the Via Ferrata, a hiking and climbing experience on Palisades Tahoe’s most iconic rock face operated by Alpenglow Expeditions. A Mountain Host tent will also be positioned in front of the tram building for activity recommendations and guest questions. New this summer, Naturalist Talks will be hosted near Cushing Pond on Saturdays and Sundays at 11 am.

Kids Adventure Camp: Launching June 20, the Kids Adventure Camp welcomes Explorers (ages 5-7) and Mountaineers (ages 8-13) to Palisades Tahoe for summer camp. Operating Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., children will engage with the great outdoors through daily rotating activities and tram rides, with snacks and lunch, included. Pricing begins at $150/day for minimum 48-hour advance registration and $170/day for a last-minute booking. Reservations are highly encouraged with limited availability for walk-ins.

Food & Beverage Offerings: On the mountain, High Camp Marketplace offers delicious grab-and-go food at the top of the tram, will be open daily from 10 am to 5 p.m., and beginning July 1, the Granite Bistro BBQ will be available on the Granite Bistro Cafe sun deck every Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Granite Bistro Cafe will be closed for the summer season. The Village also offers an array of dining options with outdoor patios and sundecks. Cool down with a smoothie from SunBowl or grab a signature “rocktail” at Rocker.

Lodging Deals and packages: Stay with us in the center of the action with deals and packages to Palisades Tahoe’s premier lodging.

Events: The Village at Palisades Tahoe also debuted an updated calendar of events headlined by The Great Bingo Revival, First Street Yoga, and Sunsets Live Music Series. There is an abundance of exciting, family-friendly events occurring all summer long, including:

A full schedule can be viewed here with all events subject to change. For more information, please visit https://www.palisadestahoe.com/.

Placer County Sheriff's arrest log: Auto burglary, theft from elder, animal cruelty

SHERIFF'S LOGEditor’s note: Arrest reports are released by the Placer County Sheriff’s Department. Suspects are considered innocent until proven guilty. Charges can be amended or dismissed.June 5Abel Mosqueda, 31, was arrested on suspicion of two counts of assault with a firearm, burglary and possession of a controlled substance in the 3700 block of Sapphire Drive in Auburn.Mark Anthony Garcia Miguel, 42, was arrested on suspicion of a felony ...

SHERIFF'S LOG

Editor’s note: Arrest reports are released by the Placer County Sheriff’s Department. Suspects are considered innocent until proven guilty. Charges can be amended or dismissed.

June 5

Abel Mosqueda, 31, was arrested on suspicion of two counts of assault with a firearm, burglary and possession of a controlled substance in the 3700 block of Sapphire Drive in Auburn.

Mark Anthony Garcia Miguel, 42, was arrested on suspicion of a felony bench warrant in the Lincoln Way and Sylvan Vista Drive area of Auburn.

Shawna Michelle Smith, 42, was arrested on suspicion of an outside misdemeanor warrant and two misdemeanor bench warrants in the Bowman Road area of Auburn.

Jessica Lynn Oden, 36, was arrested on suspicion of an outside felony warrant and two misdemeanor bench warrants.

June 6

Floyd Thomas White, 46, was arrested on suspicion of public intoxication and driving under the influence with a blood-alcohol level of .08 percent or more in the 1st Street and F Avenue area of Auburn.

Victoria Ellen Rodda, 27, was arrested on suspicion of cruelty to animals. The report did not indicate where the arrest took place.

Fernando Arriaga, 68, was arrested on suspicion of violating a court order in the Farrier Way area of Roseville.

June 7

Eric Lee Harper, 46, was arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance and paraphernalia possession in the 11801 block of Go For Broke Road in Roseville.

Casey Jubilee Stewman, 48, was arrested on suspicion of an outside felony warrant in the 2700 block of Richardson Drive in Auburn.

Carlos Antonio Hernandezmorales, 24, was arrested on suspicion of a felony bench warrant in the 700 block of S Abel Street in Milpitas.

Deangelo Omar Roberts, 30, was arrested on suspicion of parole violation, paraphernalia possession and possession of a controlled substance at Thunder Valley Casino.

Donnika Gloria Davis, 29, was arrested on suspicion of three misdemeanor bench warrants, an outside misdemeanor warrant and possession of a controlled substance. The arrest took place in the 600 block of I Street in Sacramento.

Alex William Skaggs, 26, was arrested on suspicion of auto burglary, possession of burglary tools, two outside misdemeanor warrants and an outside felony warrant. The arrest took place at Thunder Valley Casino.

Daniel Ricardo Gomez-Gil, 36, was arrested on suspicion of theft from an elder or dependent adult, theft by false pretenses, conspiracy and attempting to obtain money by false pretenses. The arrest took place in the 3100 block of Deseret Drive in Auburn.

June 8

Joseph Keikilani Denby, 35, was arrested on suspicion of an outside felony warrant in the 11800 block of Go For Broke Road in Roseville.

George Washington Bryan, 38, was arrested on suspicion of two counts of public intoxication in the 100 block of W Lake Boulevard in Tahoe City.

Amanda Ashlie Lang, 30, was arrested on suspicion of possession of metal knuckles and carrying a concealed dirk or dagger in the Colfax Avenue area of Colfax.

Kenneth Addis Lewis, 35, was arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance and a misdemeanor bench warrant in the Colfax Avenue area of Colfax.

Miles Andrew Nored, 21, was arrested on suspicion of inflicting corporal injury on a spouse or cohabitant in the 1900 block of Squaw Valley Road in Olympic Valley.

Misty Lanelle Wilson, 23, was arrested on suspicion of an outside felony warrant in the 2700 block of Richardson Drive in Auburn.

Links at Squaw Creek Sets opening date

OLYMPIC VALLEY — Resort at Squaw Creek, a mountain resort in North Lake Tahoe, has announced the opening of the Links at Squaw Creek. The golf club’s open date is May 26 and it will provide daily tee times, family-friendly golf experiences, and season passes.“Spring is officially here, and we are thrilled to announce the official opening of the Links at Squaw Creek,” said Eric Veraguth, director of golf at Resort at Squaw Creek. “Our course provides a championship golf experience that showcases the beauty...

OLYMPIC VALLEY — Resort at Squaw Creek, a mountain resort in North Lake Tahoe, has announced the opening of the Links at Squaw Creek. The golf club’s open date is May 26 and it will provide daily tee times, family-friendly golf experiences, and season passes.

“Spring is officially here, and we are thrilled to announce the official opening of the Links at Squaw Creek,” said Eric Veraguth, director of golf at Resort at Squaw Creek. “Our course provides a championship golf experience that showcases the beauty of our destination here in North Lake Tahoe. While the course provides challenging play for experienced golfers, it is also ideal for beginners and junior golfers with our special pre-set family tees, making it a fun family outing that everyone can enjoy.”

Surrounded by the towering Sierra Nevada Peaks, the Links at Squaw Creek is situated in an alpine meadow at the base of the Palisades Tahoe ski resort. The first nine of the 6,931-yard, par 71 course climbs along the mountain side through trees and narrow fairways and the back nine weaves through wetlands with tall grass, marshes and wooden cart paths. The course was designed by golf architect Robert Trent Jones Jr. to preserve the unique beauty, natural wetland, and wildlife habitat of the area.

For the 2022 golf season, the Links at Squaw Creek is providing daily tee times starting at 7 a.m. each day. As a kick-off to the season, the course is providing discounted rates between May 26 and June 9. The discounted rates are $99 for morning rounds, and $79 for rounds after 12 p.m. Starting June 10, the rates will be $129 for morning rounds, $109 for afternoon rounds, and $89 for twilight rounds after 3 p.m. The course offers special discounted rates for overnight guests of the resort and junior golfers throughout the year.

The Links at Squaw Creek features four sets of tees plus family tees that are located 150 yards from the green. Throughout the 2022 season, the golf course is providing the “Family Lake Tahoe Special” where families can play a quick and easy game on the front nine holes after 5 p.m. The special is $40 per adult and is free for children 17 and younger when accompanied by an adult, as well as half-price rental clubs.

Additionally, the Links at Squaw Creek offers season passes for local golfers. Passes include complimentary green fees, golf cart access, $50 guest passes when played with a passholder, validated parking, and special discounted rates at the restaurants at Resort at Squaw Creek. The 2022 season passes are $769 for adults, and special junior season passes are available for golfers 17 years and younger for $199 without golf cart access.

The Links at Squaw Creek is dedicated to upholding the natural beauty of its location through several environmental-friendly practices. In fact, the course is certified by the Audubon Society’s Cooperative Sanctuary Program. The certification recognizes eco-friendly courses that are dedicated to maintaining the natural environment through a variety of criteria including environmental planning, wildlife and habitat management, chemical use reduction and safety, water conservation, water quality management and outreach and education.

To book a tee time, reserve a season pass, or learn more about the 2022 season at the Links at Squaw Creek, find Links at Squaw Creek online or call 530-583-6300.

Source: Squaw Creek

Palisades Tahoe, CA Report: When the Winds Kick Up, the Stories Come Out!

Report from 18-19 April 2022, and brought to you by Palisades TahoeFollowing a huge weekend of festivities capped off with the annual Cushing Crossing and after-party on the KT sundeck, Monday morning was supposed to mellow. We were expecting another break in the weather patterns before the high winds preceding the next storm arrived later that afternoon.Acting in her own way Mother Nature changed her plans and instead...

Report from 18-19 April 2022, and brought to you by Palisades Tahoe

Following a huge weekend of festivities capped off with the annual Cushing Crossing and after-party on the KT sundeck, Monday morning was supposed to mellow. We were expecting another break in the weather patterns before the high winds preceding the next storm arrived later that afternoon.

Acting in her own way Mother Nature changed her plans and instead introduced high winds shortly after 9 am. Only those lucky few riders who were up the hill at the start got their one to two laps in on Siberia, Shirley, or Granite Chief lifts. When yours truly arrived at the top near 9:45 am ski patrol was already announcing all lifts had been placed on wind hold and the Mountain Run was going to it for the day.

Readjusting our morning stoke, we looked ahead to see what we could find on the Mountain Run. Despite the strong winds, temperatures were warm in the mid-40s and the snow was already soft at the top. The snow skied well with some corn farming happening on the upper elevations earlier in the day.

After lunch, however, the snowpack finally hit its peak at the bottom and started to get sticky and slushy. About 2 pm and after nonstop laps, we decided to be safe out there and call it a day.

Overnight the winds seemed to die down and the next storm moved in. Freezing rain and sleet greeted us at dawn then accelerated to snowing heavily near start time. Despite low visibility, our expectations were again high thinking that the upper mountain had received some more snow. Yet at 9 am, ski patrol again cited high winds and announced the Funitel would be the only lift running.

As we exited the Gold Coast station at the top of the Funitel it was obvious that the upper mountain had received 2-3” of heavy, wet powder. This made for some especially fun turns below the Siberia lift on the skier’s far-right. The day was mostly stormy with low visibility which made it hard for charging. But those faithful who stayed all day (myself included) were rewarded with about 1.5 hours of sunshine to close out Tuesday afternoon. Each one of us who stuck it out was smiling ear to ear as we found what we had been looking for… clear skies and soft snow!

The skiing, however, was really only half the story. The wind may have blown in and closed the lifts, but they also seemed to help us bring out the stories as we got cozy on the Funitel rides back up the mountain. Some of the most interesting conversations I overheard or participated in include:

We also witnessed the aftermath of two natural avalanches on the West Face of KT. As astutely pointed out by our “Everest” guide, the top of Chute 75 slid about a third of the slope and then 5th Alternate also slid almost the entire slope. This avalanche even crossed the Mountain Run where it had since been groomed over. Pretty interesting observation given that KT had been closed now for almost two weeks!

All in all, we accomplished two days of good skiing across a wide range of weather and conditions only to be rewarded in the end with some sun laps and great stories!

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