Appliance Repair in South Dos Palos, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in South Dos Palos, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in South Dos Palos, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in South Dos Palos, CA

Week 1 high school football scores: Latest Friday results from the Central Section

Week 1 of high school football started in the Fresno area on Thursday that included Clovis High hosting Long Beach Poly at Lamonica Stadium.Here are the running scores for Week 1 in the Central Section.NonleagueBuchanan 56, Bakersfield 3, finalHanford 41, Bullard 22, finalClovis East 48, Dinuba 21, finalClovis West 42, Ridgeview 0, finalEdison 20, Kennedy 13, finalGarza 27, Immanuel 14, finalBakersfield Christian 35, Mission Prep 9, finalBoron 8, Foothill 0, final...

Week 1 of high school football started in the Fresno area on Thursday that included Clovis High hosting Long Beach Poly at Lamonica Stadium.

Here are the running scores for Week 1 in the Central Section.

Nonleague

Buchanan 56, Bakersfield 3, final

Hanford 41, Bullard 22, final

Clovis East 48, Dinuba 21, final

Clovis West 42, Ridgeview 0, final

Edison 20, Kennedy 13, final

Garza 27, Immanuel 14, final

Bakersfield Christian 35, Mission Prep 9, final

Boron 8, Foothill 0, final

Bishop 36, Lindsay 3, final

San Luis Obispo 35, Nipomo 0 final

Independence 7, Pioneer Valley 0, final

Santa Ynez 21, Atascadero 0, final

Delano 33, Mira Monte 29, final

San Joaquin Memorial 34, Clovis North 0, final

Sanger 58, Sanger West 0, final

Chavez 26, Arvin 0, final

Centennial 28, Redwood 21, final

Caruthers 21, Coalinga 14, final

Corcoran 27, Fowler 14, final

Santa Maria 24, East Bakersfield 22, final

Reedley 34, Firebaugh 12, final

Frontier 34, North 13, final

Sunnyside 50, Golden Valley-Bakersfield 21, final

Golden West 16, Arroyo Grande 13, final

Kingsburg 35, Paso Robles 0, final

Porterville 14, McLane 6, final

Liberty-Madera Ranchos 34, Mendota 14, final

Mission Oak 56, Monache 0, final

Sierra Pacific 26, Orange Cove 7, final

Lemoore 78, Selma 6, final

Wasco 30, South 25, final

Taft 29, Kern Valley 0, final

Torres 28, Madera 25, final

Mt. Whitney 29, Tulare Union 16, final

Shafter 46, West 6, final

Kerman 35, Chowchilla 28, final

Madera South 41, Orosi 13, final

Strathmore 18, Exeter 12, final

Washington Union 61, Fresno 0, final

Interesectional

St. Joseph 19, Palos Verdes 16, final

Lompoc 53, Agoura 12, final

Tehachapi 52, Burroughs 0, final

Cabrillo-Lompoc 51, Nordhoff-Ojai 19, final

St. Monica vs. Desert, canceled

San Marcos 35, Morro Bay 18, final

Bishop Diego 41, Righetti 19, final

Central 28, Edison-Stockton 7, final

Los Banos 35, Dos Palos 27, final

Fillmore 49, California City 0, final

Los Alamitos 41, Garces 0, final

Central Valley Christian 42, Ripon Christian 14, final

Liberty-Bakersfield 58, Spanish Springs-Sparks, Nev. 17, final

Littlerock 28, Rosamond 0, final

Mammoth 47, Tonopah-Nevada 26, final

Intersectional

Long Beach Poly 56, Clovis 7, Final

Nonleague

Sierra 27, Minarets 21, Final

Woodlake 21, Hanford West 14, Final (OT)

Riverdale 37, Tranquillity 21, Final

Tulare Western 31, El Diamante 13, Final

Mariposa County 36, Yosemite 12, Final

Farmersville 47, Parlier 0, Final

Avenal 35, McFarland 0, Final

Frontier 35, North 13, Final

Highland 24, Stockdale 14, Final

New Designs University Park at Lone Pine, canceled

This story was originally published August 19, 2022 8:43 PM.

Dos Palos receives $11 million in state funding to help with water issues

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- The City of Dos Palos is set to receive $11 million in state funding to address water issues that have plagued the community in recent months and previous years.City leaders say the grant funding will pay for the construction of a new water treatment plant and some improvements to the existing facility, which was built in 1969.Approximately $6 million will come from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, and $5 million is through Proposition 68, which California voters approved in 2018.Back in ...

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- The City of Dos Palos is set to receive $11 million in state funding to address water issues that have plagued the community in recent months and previous years.

City leaders say the grant funding will pay for the construction of a new water treatment plant and some improvements to the existing facility, which was built in 1969.

Approximately $6 million will come from the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund, and $5 million is through Proposition 68, which California voters approved in 2018.

Back in 2013, Dos Palos residents and businesses had to rely on bottled water until the aging filtration system could be replaced using a half-million-dollar grant.

This year, the water supply has been cut off multiple times due in part to high levels of algae in the California Aqueduct clogging equipment. The latest boil water notice was just lifted on Thursday.

City officials say they filed an application for funding in November of 2019 and took part in dozens of meetings with state officials who were reviewing the plan. Congressman Jim Costa and Assemblyman Adam Gray later helped coordinate more meetings to push the review process forward over the summer. Local leaders made another plea on Monday after the latest outages, and they say the money was finally approved.

"This is excellent news because the good part of this is it's grant money so that will not have to be paid back," said Dos Palos City Manager, Darrell Fonseca. "There may be a loan portion in the supplemental portion after this project starts, but right now, it's 100% grant, and that's critical to our low-income people here to not have to bear that burden as we build the new plant."

Dos Palos Mayor April Hogue said residents also need to conserve water.

"Not only are we going to have the first steps to a new plant, but we're also going to have to start taking measures to start cutting back on our water usage so that we'll have enough water for months and years to come," she said.

City leaders say it will likely take at least a year to build the new plant next to the old one, but they have plans for a temporary system to help minimize the impact on residents.

They also plan to conduct a rate study to help determine the best way to fund another five million dollars' worth of work that will need to be done.

Editor's Note: The video above is from a previous broadcast.

Unprecedented water restrictions hit Southern California today: What they mean to you

Get ready for short showers and brown lawns: More than 6 million Southern Californians will be placed under new drought rules today in an unprecedented effort to conserve water.The restrictions are a response to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s urgent call for a 35% reduction in water use following California’s driest-ever start to the year. MW...

Get ready for short showers and brown lawns: More than 6 million Southern Californians will be placed under new drought rules today in an unprecedented effort to conserve water.

The restrictions are a response to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s urgent call for a 35% reduction in water use following California’s driest-ever start to the year. MWD’s board has never before issued such severe cuts, but said they were left with little recourse after state officials slashed deliveries from the State Water Project to just 5%.

“We have not had the supply to meet the normal demands that we have, and now we need to prioritize between watering our lawns and having water for our children and our grandchildren and livelihood and health,” MWD General Manager Adel Hagekhalil said during the agency’s announcement at the end of April.

More than 97% of the state is now under severe, extreme or exceptional drought, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Many of the region’s most critical reservoirs are at half capacity or less.

Here’s what you need to know about the new rules that begin today, June 1:

Who is affected?

As a wholesaler, MWD has aimed its cuts at parts of Los Angeles, Ventura and San Bernardino counties that are dependent on supplies from the State Water Project, a vast network of canals, pipelines, reservoirs and pumping facilities that transport water from Northern California rivers to farmlands and cities to the south.

Six agencies that receive water from MWD will be affected by the rules: the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, Calleguas Municipal Water District, Three Valleys Municipal Water District and Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District.

Several of those agencies are themselves wholesalers that provide water to dozens of smaller regional suppliers.

Areas that get water from another major source in the region, the Colorado River, have been spared for now, although officials have warned that it is also reaching critical lows.

What are the rules?

Each agency is taking a slightly different approach to achieving the required reduction, meaning there is a patchwork of rules across the region. Most are focusing their restrictions on outdoor watering since it accounts for roughly half of all urban water use.

MWD’s largest member agency, LADWP, is limiting its entire service area — that is, nearly everyone in the city of L.A. — to two-day-a-week watering at only 8 minutes per station per day, or two 15 minute-cycles per watering day for sprinklers with water-conserving nozzles.

Residents will be assigned watering days based on their addresses: Monday and Friday for odd addresses and Thursday and Sunday for even ones. No watering will be allowed between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. regardless of the watering days.

Those who don’t comply with the new rules will receive a warning, followed by escalating fines for each subsequent violation, officials said. LADWP will ramp up patrols to look for people violating rules or wasting water.

Some agencies, including the Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, are going a step further and opting for one-day-a-week watering limits. That agency provides water to about 75,000 residents in Calabasas, Agoura Hills, Hidden Hills and Westlake Village.

Others, including the Inland Empire Utilities Agency and the Ventura-based Calleguas Municipal Water District, both wholesalers, are tapping each of their member agencies to institute the best plans for their areas. Some will go to one-day-a-week watering, while others are sticking to volumetric allocations based on available supplies, officials said.

The West Basin Municipal Water District, which supplies water to residents in areas including Culver City, El Segundo, Inglewood and Palos Verdes Estates and Malibu, is also calling for two-day-a-week watering limits across its service area.

Are there exceptions to the rules?

Most agencies, including the DWP, are making exceptions for hand-watering and for drip irrigation that supplies water to a food source.

What about trees, pools and golf courses?

Though officials have said Southern California “cannot afford green lawns,” they have stressed that they do not want trees to die. Trees provide valuable shade, replenish groundwater and help stave off heat effects, among other benefits

Fortunately, experts said the new drought restrictions shouldn’t have an effect on trees if followed correctly.

“Even the most delicate trees would be happy with eight minutes twice a week, and the larger trees will be happy with the occasional heavy watering by hand,” board certified master arborist Nick Araya told The Times.

Swimming pools have also been a question for many in the area. Under the current rules, most water agencies recommend — but do not yet require — the use of pool covers to prevent evaporation.

The DWP, for example, said only the next phase of its drought ordinance would make covering residential pools a requirement, while the final phase, Phase 5, would prohibit filling them with water.

Some residents said the lax pool rules are sending a mixed message, but the California Pool & Spa. Assn. said they make sense: Though the average pool requires 14,000 to 18,000 gallons of water to initially fill, pools can help save water over time by replacing thirsty grass that would require constant watering.

Many residents have also pointed out that golf courses account for a huge amount of grass in the city, but officials have said some golf courses — both private and municipal — use recycled water. Courses that don’t will be required to work with the city to achieve reduction targets.

And while showers aren’t officially in the crosshairs of the cuts, people are being asked to save water wherever they can, including in the shower. State officials last month encouraged Californians to shorten their showers to five minutes and switch away from baths, which can use up to 2.5 times as much water.

What’s the long-term plan?

MWD officials have already said they are authorized to institute a full outdoor watering ban as soon as September if conservation efforts do not improve, and Gov. Gavin Newsom last week said the state could be forced to impose mandatory restrictions for the same reason.

While the new outdoor watering limits should help achieve immediate savings, some have pointed out that they’re a short-term solution to what will likely be a long-term problem.

“With climate change, this is not a temporary drought condition,” Councilman Paul Krekorian said during last week’s L.A. City Council meeting about the ordinance. “This is our future, and those dark red areas [on the U.S. Drought Monitor map] are going to get bigger.”

City, county and state officials are working toward solutions, including improving infrastructure and water conveyance systems, as well as investing in enhanced capabilities for groundwater remediation, stormwater capture and water recycling.

One major initiative, Operation Next, aims to recycle as much as 100% of purified wastewater from the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant by 2035.

Los Angeles is also investing heavily in rebate programs for turf replacement and appliance upgrades to improve residents’ water efficiency, and the state last week banned watering ‘nonfunctional’ grass at commercial, industrial and institutional properties.

And while MWD’s new drought rules are aimed primarily at urban users, officials have acknowledged that the vast majority of the state’s water that is used by humans goes toward agriculture — as much as 80%. Many farmers this year were put on notice that they, too, will receive limited allocations from state and federal suppliers.

Los Banos couple named fair co-grand marshals

Good things take time, it is said, and eventually everything will come together. For Rhonda and Larry Borelli, Sr., eventually is here.Both were chosen in 2020 to be the Grand Marshals of the Merced County Spring Fair in Los Banos, but due to Covid the fair was cancelled. Now, in 2022, they will fulfill their title as this year’s Grand Marshals at the fair, which runs from April 27 through May 1.For Larry, the family roots of agriculture run deep. He was born in Dos Palos and has been a farmer most of his life as was his ...

Good things take time, it is said, and eventually everything will come together. For Rhonda and Larry Borelli, Sr., eventually is here.

Both were chosen in 2020 to be the Grand Marshals of the Merced County Spring Fair in Los Banos, but due to Covid the fair was cancelled. Now, in 2022, they will fulfill their title as this year’s Grand Marshals at the fair, which runs from April 27 through May 1.

For Larry, the family roots of agriculture run deep. He was born in Dos Palos and has been a farmer most of his life as was his father before him.

Early in his life Larry also worked for the San Luis Canal Company. Currently Larry grows cotton, fresh market tomatoes, alfalfa, wheat, and white corn. He has been a member of the fair board for 12 years, from 2003 to 2015.

Rhonda was born and raised in Los Banos and has been a hospital medical coder for Memorial Hospital in Los Banos for the past 40 years.

Both Larry and Rhonda were actively involved in the Spring Fair, also known as the May Day Fair, while in high school in the mid-60s. Larry was showing animals in the FFA, while Rhonda was active in 4H with entries in cooking and sewing.

“The Merced County Spring Fair is important to Los Banos,” Larry said, “because it helps keep the community core together.

“And it helps keep the community connected to agriculture,” Larry said. “If you want to see the diversity of local farming, the fair is the place to be. Every day it’s something different. There are dairy cattle in the arena. There are sheep and goats, and some days there are rabbits and birds.”

Both Larry and Rhonda are very proud of the Little Hands agricultural exhibit at the fair. The first year that Larry was a fair director he was part of helping create the exhibit. And Rhonda continues to volunteer inside Little Hands each year by helping the children understand the importance of agriculture in the Central Valley.

Larry remembers local dairyman Phil Fanelli back in the early 2000s showing children how to milk cows by hand. Then, years later, with funding from Hilmar Cheese, the fair built what is now a 7,200 square foot agriculture exhibit called the Henry Miller Farm, with many different animals which fairgoers can pet. As the fair continues to grow, Larry said, “the main theme continues to be agriculture.”

Rhonda volunteers each year at the Merced County United For Life booth located in the O’Banion Building. She enjoys interacting with children who are inquisitive about the various stages of the unborn children and providing information for them.

Over the years Larry and his son Nathan of Turlock, have been working at the junior livestock auction, where all of the animals are sold after they have been shown by the FFA and 4H students. Nathan and his wife, Elizabeth have three children, Abrianna, Rocco and Matteo.

When reminiscing about the years of working the fair auction Larry said, “I was blessed to work with a bunch of really good people. I enjoyed it so much.”

The Borellis have two sons and a daughter. They have seven grandchildren, five boys and two girls ranging in ages from eight to 17 years old. And they are all involved in 4H or FFA.

Their daughter, Natasha Crivelli recently graduated from the California Agricultural Leadership program and is currently the President of the Merced County Spring Fair Board after being appointed in 2015 by the late Merced County Supervisor Jerry O’Banion. She and her husband, Chris, farm in Dos Palos.

Their son, Larry Borelli, Jr., is an agriculture teacher at Los Banos High School. Larry Jr. ands wife, Mindy of Los Banos have four children, Larry III, Brokton, Angelina and Luke. As an ag teacher, Larry Jr. continues to promote agriculture as his father taught him.

“Agriculture teaches life skills,” the elder Borelli said. “It can be growing a potted plant to raising a bird, rabbit or whatever. Learning the importance of responsibility may be the most important life skill.”

The Borellis will be part of the Merced County Spring Fair May Day parade in downtown Los Banos on Saturday, April 30, and they will be participating during the opening ceremonies each day of the fair.

Valley's oldest baseball tournaments kick off

Spring break means it’s tournament time with high school baseball tournaments in Selma and Fowler.One of the Valley’s oldest baseball tournaments, the 64th annual Selma High School and Selma Greater Kiwanis Easter tournament begins with 12 teams in action on Monday at Selma High School’s Allen Cropsey Diamond at Bobby Cox Field and at the Immanuel High School sports complex.The Monday schedule at Selma has Coalinga (2-7-1 through Saturday) facing Yosemite (4-6) at 11 a.m., Dos Palos (7-3) versus Coalinga at 1:...

Spring break means it’s tournament time with high school baseball tournaments in Selma and Fowler.

One of the Valley’s oldest baseball tournaments, the 64th annual Selma High School and Selma Greater Kiwanis Easter tournament begins with 12 teams in action on Monday at Selma High School’s Allen Cropsey Diamond at Bobby Cox Field and at the Immanuel High School sports complex.

The Monday schedule at Selma has Coalinga (2-7-1 through Saturday) facing Yosemite (4-6) at 11 a.m., Dos Palos (7-3) versus Coalinga at 1:45 p.m. and Selma (7-8) versus Chavez (7-7-2) at 4:30 p.m. The Monday action concludes with Dos Palos taking on Selma at 7 p.m.

At Immanuel, the action begins at it 11 a.m. with El Capitan of Merced (10-4) facing Madera South (8-4-1) before undefeated Kerman (13-0) faces the Stallions of Madera South at 1:45 p.m. Immanuel (6-7) takes the field at 4:30 p.m. against Sierra Pacific (10-5) while Kerman battles Immanuel at 7 p.m.

Two games will be played on the Immanuel Junior Varsity Field as Sierra (5-8) faces McLane (10-4 at 1:30 p.m. and McLane takes on Yosemite at 7 p.m.

The tournament continues on Tuesday at Selma with Madera South facing Chavez at 11 a.m.before Yosemite battles Dos Palos at 1:45 p.m. Chavez comes back at 4:30 p.m. to face Sierra Pacific before Selma takes on Kerman at 7 p.m.

Games will only be played at the Immanuel Varsity Field on Tuesday — Sierra has a doubleheader facing Sierra Pacific at 11 a.m.and Coalinga at 1:45 p.m. El Capitan has a Tuesday doubleheader taking on McLane at 4:30 p.m. and Immanuel at 7 p.m.

Each team will play one game on Wednesday, April 13. At Selma, Coalinga faces McLane at 10 a.m., followed by El Capitan and Kerman at 12:30 p.m. and Yosemite versus Selma at 3 p.m.

On the Immanuel Varsity Field, Sierra Pacific faces Dos Palos at 11 a.m. before Madera South takes on Immanuel at 1:30 p.m. On the JV diamond, Chavez faces Sierra at 1:30 p.m.

The two teams with the best record, using strikeouts at a tiebreaker, will meet in a 6 p.m. championship game.

The eight-team Fowler Easter Baseball Classic actually started on March 30 with Fowler (7-7) edging Minarets (8-10) 2-1. The tournament continued on Thursday with Washington Union (10-5) downing Firebaugh (3-10) 4-0 in nine innings and two games on Saturday as Monache of Porterville (12-3-1) defeated Dinuba (5-12) 12-3 and Kingsburg (11-3-1) got past Lemoore (5-10) 11-1.

The tournament will resume on Saturday, April 9 at Fowler High School’s Kellogg Field. The Vikings face Washington Union in the 10 a.m. opener followed by Monache and Minarets at p.m., Firebaugh against Lemoore at 4 p.m. and Fowler meeting Dinuba at 7 p.m.

The Monday schedule has Minarets taking on Dinuba at 10 a.m., Kingsburg facing Firebaugh at 1 p.m., Lemoore and Washington Union at 4 p.m. and Monache facing Fowler at 7 p.m.

Dinuba, Fowler, Minarets and Monache are in Pool A while Firebaugh, Kingsburg, Lemoore and Washington Union are in Pool B. The two pool winners will face each other in the 7:30 p.m. varsity championship game.

The popular contests will include a wheels contest, a catchers cannon contest and a home run derby at 6:30 p.m.

Dinuba, Fowler, Firebaugh and Lemoore are entered in a junior baseball tournament on the same dates.

Dinuba (9-6) will be joined by Chowchilla (6-4), Firebaugh (3-5) and Orange Cove (12-3) in the White Pool of the Fowler Easter Classic softball tournament while Delano (1-6) Fowler (9-4), Mt. Whitney (8-5) and San Joaquin Memorial (8-6-1) are in the Red Pool.

It’s official. Daughter of California farmworkers makes U.S. District Court history

Ana Isabela de Alba – the 42-year-old daughter of Mexican immigrant farmworkers who grew up in South Dos Palos using a sleeping bag until she was 15 – became the first Latina judge on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California on Friday afternoon.Accompanied by her mother, Ana Celia de Alba, and about three dozen relatives and supporters, the Fresno County Superior Court judge took the oath of office from U.S. District Judge Dale A. Drozd less than six months after being nominated for the post by Presid...

Ana Isabela de Alba – the 42-year-old daughter of Mexican immigrant farmworkers who grew up in South Dos Palos using a sleeping bag until she was 15 – became the first Latina judge on the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of California on Friday afternoon.

Accompanied by her mother, Ana Celia de Alba, and about three dozen relatives and supporters, the Fresno County Superior Court judge took the oath of office from U.S. District Judge Dale A. Drozd less than six months after being nominated for the post by President Joe Biden.

In a 7-minute ceremony, de Alba was sworn in to her new post.

“We’re so happy to have you as a colleague. We just couldn’t be prouder and more happy about her coming to this court and agreeing to serve with us,” Drozd told de Alba before swearing her in.

Becoming a trailblazer isn’t lost on de Alba.

“It’s been absolutely huge because you have an entire generation of people who think I don’t belong there,” she said.

Growing up, she didn’t have the luxury of counselors who believed in her desire to go into law or who could help her with the college application process.

“I felt very lonely,” said de Alba, who absorbed the necessary information by spending time with a friend whose parents were lawyers.

She then had her mother demand that she be given a chance to take junior college courses while in high school to improve her chances of going to college.

“It’s all about confidence. It’s all about being able to put your best foot forward,” said de Alba. “It doesn’t matter that you’re the first because you can still do it. You don’t need the five generations behind you to get to that point.”

Her humble background was brought up at the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting by Sen. Alex Padilla.

“Judge de Alba watched her mother and grandmother struggle with unfair treatment, as they worked together in some of the hardest jobs in the world,” said Padilla. “She decided that one day, she would become a lawyer to help families like her own.”

Padilla, who noted that de Alba established a workers’ rights clinic for low wage workers, called her “dedicated, fair and universally respected by her colleagues.”

“She will bring a deep knowledge of the Central Valley, and a passion for equal justice informed by her own family’s story,” said Padilla.

De Alba, speaking during an interview on July 6, noted her mother’s determination in making sure her only daughter thrived.

“I literally had to take my mother in sometimes when I was 16 and say, ‘I want her to take college classes’ because my school didn’t have advanced placement classes and I wanted to go to Harvard,” said de Alba.

The school discouraged her from taking those classes, saying the classes would be too hard and she would get discouraged.

“That was a little frustrating,” she said.

Her mother also ended de Alba’s days of working in the fields.

“I worked in the fields with my mom until about the fourth grade,” said de Alba, who by then was starting to get improper comments from male field workers.

Her mother said, “You’re not going to work here because you’re too little. I don’t want you exposed to that.”

De Alba kept working, but not in the fields. She put her reading and English skills to work as a paid tutor. In high school, she worked for an insurance company across from the high school before getting a job at the hospital her final two years.

Ana Celia also went to bat for her daughter when she wanted to go to UC Berkeley.

“My father was like, ‘Where are you going? You don’t need to go. You need to stay here and get married,’” said de Alba. “My mom was like, ‘OK, you have the brains for it. You got in. Do it. My mom was a great support.”

Ana Celia remembers when her daughter got poor marks in penmanship in the third grade.

“She spent her entire vacation alone, writing, writing, writing until she learned it well,” said her mother.

Ana Celia encouraged parents to “have faith in their children because they can if you teach them that they can.”

De Alba’s idea of becoming a lawyer came when she was 6 years old and accompanying her mother and grandmother while they were picking tomatoes and getting paid by the bucket.

“My job was basically to go get the water so they wouldn’t have to stop there in the middle of the row,” said de Alba.

One day, she complained the water was dirty.

“The mayordomo (foreman) made an example of me. He said, ‘Oh well, if we’re all going to complain, we might as well call the media!’”

De Alba got upset. “I didn’t do anything wrong. This guy is not letting us have drinking water. There’s nothing wrong with that.”

That evening while recounting the experience to Fernando, the oldest of her three brothers, he responded, “Well, you’re pretty mouthy, so you should become a lawyer.”

“What’s a lawyer do?” she asked.

“They fight for people’s rights with their words. They argue all day.”

“Oh, sounds like a dream job for me.”

That sparked her career choice.

“My mom is very strong-willed. She’s very intelligent; one of the smartest people I’ve ever met,” said de Alba of her mother who only got a second-grade education in Jalisco, México.”

Her mother, she said, is that there is no crying allowed.

“With my mother, we were never told to back down, be quiet. But we weren’t braggy,” said de Alba. “We certainly didn’t shy away from acknowledging that something was wrong and they try to stand up for people if we could stand up for them.”

De Alba will be busy trying to shore up what is the busiest U.S. District Court in the country. Judges carry twice the workload of the average judge in the nation.

“That court has been overworked and understaffed for decades really, because they don’t have enough judges and they have too many cases,” said University of Richmond law professor Carl Tobias. “And, Congress has not had a comprehensive judgeship bill in 32 years.”

De Alba looks forward to the challenge.

“I love to work hard. It’s part of my DNA,” said de Alba.

Esta historia fue publicada originalmente el 8 de julio de 2022 1:22 pm.

Scorching heat in the Fresno area causes some prep football games to be pushed back

The heat wave scorching the central San Joaquin Valley is affecting the opening week of high school football.By Wednesday afternoon, several games had been moved up a day or pushed back because of the heat.Friday’s temperature in Fresno is predicted to be 103 degrees, according to the National Weather Service in Hanford. The weather service said a heat advisory is in effect from 11 p.m. Thursday to 8 p.m. Friday.Some games will be played on Thursday despite forecast daytime temperatures reaching as high as 105 degr...

The heat wave scorching the central San Joaquin Valley is affecting the opening week of high school football.

By Wednesday afternoon, several games had been moved up a day or pushed back because of the heat.

Friday’s temperature in Fresno is predicted to be 103 degrees, according to the National Weather Service in Hanford. The weather service said a heat advisory is in effect from 11 p.m. Thursday to 8 p.m. Friday.

Some games will be played on Thursday despite forecast daytime temperatures reaching as high as 105 degrees in the region.

Games moving to Thursday are Minarets at Sierra (7 p.m.) and Riverdale at Tranquillity (7:30 p.m.). The Riverdale-Tranquillity game was moved up a day because of a shortage of referees.

The Friday Hanford at Bullard game is slated to start at 7 p.m., but could be changed to 8 p.m. if the temperature reaches 105 degrees.

Games that were impacted by the heat that moved their game back an hour includes Avenal at McFarland, Madera South at Orosi and Kerman at Chowchilla.

Buchanan will host Bakersfield at 7 p.m. Friday instead of 6:30 p.m.

Here is the latest on start times for each game:

Intersectional

Long Beach Poly at Clovis, 7 p.m.

Nonleague

Minarets at Sierra, 7 p.m.

Hanford West at Woodlake, 7:15 p.m.

Riverdale at Tranquillity, 7:30 p.m.

Tulare Western at El Diamante, 7:30 p.m.

Mariposa County at Yosemite, 7 :30 p.m.

Avenal at McFarland, 8:30 p.m.

Nonleague

Bakersfield at Buchanan, 7 p.m.

Hanford at Bullard, 7 p.m. or 8 p.m. (Ratcliffe Stadium)

Clovis East Dinuba, 7 p.m.

Ridgeview at Clovis West, 7 p.m. (Lamonica Stadium)

Kennedy at Edison, 7 p.m. (Sunnyside Stadium)

Immanuel at Garza, 7 p.m. (Koligian Stadium)

Mission Prep at Bakersfield Christian, 7 p.m.

Foothill at Boron, 7 p.m.

Bishop at Lindsay, 7 p.m.

San Luis Obispo at Nipomo, 7 p.m.

Independence at Pioneer Valley, 7 p.m.

Atascadero at Santa Ynez, 7 p.m.

Delano at Mira Monte, 7:15 p.m.

Clovis North at San Joaquin Memorial, 7:30 p.m.

Sanger West at Sanger, 7:30 p.m.

Chavez at Arvin, 7:30 p.m.

Centennial at Redwood, 7:30 p.m. (Mineral King Bowl)

Caruthers at Coalinga, 7:30 p.m.

Fowler at Corcoran, 7:30 p.m.

Santa Maria at East Bakersfield, 7:30 p.m.

Reedley at Firebaugh, 7:30 p.m.

North at Frontier, 7:30 p.m.

Sunnyside at Golden Valley-Bakersfield, 7:30 p.m.

Arroyo Grande at Golden West, 7:30 p.m.

Stockdale at Highland, 7:30 p.m.

Paso Robles at Kingsburg, 7:30 p.m.

Porterville at McLane, 7:30 p.m.

Liberty-Madera Ranchos at Mendota, 7:30 p.m.

Mission Oak at Monache, 7:30 p.m.

Sierra Pacific at Orange Cove, 7:30 p.m.

Farmersville at Parlier, 7:30 p.m.

Lemoore at Selma, 7:30 p.m.

Wasco at South, 7:30 p.m.

Kern Valley at Taft, 7:30 p.m.

Torres at Madera, 7:30 p.m.

Mt. Whitney at Tulare Union, 7:30 p.m.

Shafter at West, 7:30 p.m.

Kerman at Chowchilla, 8 p.m.

Madera South at Orosi, 8 p.m.

Exeter at Strathmore, 8 p.m.

Fresno at Washington Union, 8 p.m.

Intersectional

Palos Verdes at St. Joseph, 6 p.m.

Lompoc at Agoura, 7 p.m.

Tehachapi at Burroughs, 7 p.m.

Cabrillo-Lompoc vs. Nordhoff-Ojai, 7 p.m.

St. Monica at Desert, 7 p.m.

San Marcos at Morro Bay, 7 p.m.

Righetti vs. Bishop Diego, 7 p.m.

Central at Edison-Stockton, 7:15 p.m.

Los Banos at Dos Palos, 7:30 p.m.

California City at Fillmore, 7 p.m.

Los Alamitos at Garces, 7 p.m.

Central Valley Christian at Ripon Christian, 7:30 p.m.

Spanish Springs-Sparks, Nev. at Liberty-Bakersfield, 7:30 p.m.

Littlerock at Rosamond, 7 p.m.

Tonopah-Nevada at Mammoth, 7 p.m.

New Designs University Park at Lone Pine, 7 p.m.

Let The Bee know about other changes by emailing agalaviz@fresnobee.com.

This story was originally published August 17, 2022 2:22 PM.

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