Appliance Repair in Snelling, CA

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Snelling, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Snelling, CA

Dennis Gates is a lot more in the box hire than you think

Last night the late breaking news that Missouri had narrowed its search and were focusing on Cleveland State Head Coach Dennis Gates brought about a reaction. Most of it wasn’t great.It was a little disheartening to see such a disparity in hopefulness towards the new head coach. But I just want to recap that 83% of the fans who voted that it was time to move on from Cuonzo Martin, and nearly 70% are unhappy with the hire of Dennis Gates.So what percentage of the people voting in these things are just miserable in general?...

Last night the late breaking news that Missouri had narrowed its search and were focusing on Cleveland State Head Coach Dennis Gates brought about a reaction. Most of it wasn’t great.

It was a little disheartening to see such a disparity in hopefulness towards the new head coach. But I just want to recap that 83% of the fans who voted that it was time to move on from Cuonzo Martin, and nearly 70% are unhappy with the hire of Dennis Gates.

So what percentage of the people voting in these things are just miserable in general?

I do think you can reasonably believe it was time to move on from Martin while also reasonably not loving the hire of Dennis Gates. Over the last week or so most fans seemed to be coalescing around either Todd Golden or Kim English, with some side eye towards Matt McMahon. But as I said on the podcast, Gates is a name who has always been on the periphery of the search, but only from our standpoint.

For the last week the names you’ve heard the most were McMahon, English, Golden and Gates. But when Florida hired Golden, I guess we all just assumed it was McMahon or English. I include myself in that. We’d heard from all kinds of different sources that most everyone thought it was McMahon, with English as the backup. I felt pretty good about both.

For whatever reason I just didn’t think Gates made much sense at Mizzou. There’s a lot to like about him, but I wagered there were too many similarities with the previous coach that Mizzou would probably steer clear.

Stop me if you’ve heard this before, but Gates comes from an underprivileged inner-city area (West Chicago), attended a rigorous academic institution for college (California), had a short pro career and got into coaching. The bulk of his coaching career focused on a style of basketball which prides itself on defense and toughness (Florida State). Sounds a lot like the last guy, right?

So it would almost seem like the Administration loved everything about Cuonzo Martin, except for his recruiting. So they went and found a guy who is almost Cuonzo Martin, but with a little different pedigree on the recruiting side. While both Martin and Gates pride themselves on finding guys with toughness, Martin seemed to look for it as a primary trait, and Gates seems to look for it as a secondary trait. But the quotes keep coming back on Gates, he can recruit.

Martin was a really good basketball coach who didn’t get the necessary talent on campus to get him over the top. Even if Gates isn’t as good of a gameday coach, or in game coach, if you have better players they should be able to make up the difference.

And that was this all come down to. Getting players.

Dennis Gates has a rep as a guy who will be relentless at getting the dudes to compete. He’s got a big task of assembling a top flight staff, and remaking the roster into one that be more competitive in the SEC. The league is dominated by John Calipari, Rick Barnes, Bruce Pearl, and Eric Musselman. Behind them are some terrific coaches in Buzz Williams, Nate Oats, Jerry Stackhouse, plus a new group of hires coming to LSU, South Carolina, Florida and sort of Georgia.

The Board of Curators still has to meet and approve the contract, but once it’s done Gates has to hit the ground running. The potential exists for him to be really good.

As I like to say, hiring a new coach is a crapshoot. You never know what you’re going to get. Good looking hires don’t work out, and bad looking hires work out. There’s a lot of people who think this is a bad hire. I’m not among them. It’s not the hire I would have made, as I think I’ve been clear I’d preferred Medved, or English, or McMahon. But if Gates is the guy I think there are enough reasons to think he can be really good. He’s just got to execute the plan.

How to turn your shed into a man cave or she shed, from planning permission to neighbour advice

Have the past two years left you with a longing for a room of your own? Crowded lockdown houses only intensified the desire for space and privacy, especially those seeking a free surface on which to perch a laptop.Thanks to those of us lucky enough to have a bit of space outside and some spare cash, this has meant one thing: boom time for the makers of fancy sheds and cabins. And, anecdotally at least, the saving of a fair few marriages. Demand for garden rooms, aka “man caves” and “she sheds”, soared by as muc...

Have the past two years left you with a longing for a room of your own? Crowded lockdown houses only intensified the desire for space and privacy, especially those seeking a free surface on which to perch a laptop.

Thanks to those of us lucky enough to have a bit of space outside and some spare cash, this has meant one thing: boom time for the makers of fancy sheds and cabins. And, anecdotally at least, the saving of a fair few marriages. Demand for garden rooms, aka “man caves” and “she sheds”, soared by as much as 2,000 per cent compared to before the pandemic.

“If anything can go into a room outside, we’ve done it over the last few years,” says Tim Snelling, business development manager at The Green Retreats Group, in Westcott, Buckinghamshire, which erects around 140 garden rooms a month.

“Home offices are the most popular, followed by home gyms and entertainment, including man caves and she caves. People weren’t going away and wanted to spend money on their home.” One train hobbyist filled the space with railway tracks.

But Roach, whose business, TheFoodies.org, teaches children and families to grow their own vegetables, thinks the trend is more gender-balanced.

“If you have a hobby that you don’t share with your partner, asking for a shed for a bit of the garden is a nice way to allow each other to have separate bits of their lives without the other person having to live with it all the time.”

Snelling adds: “Demand for garden rooms is usually inspired by a space-in-the-house issue. They are the solution.”

There was nothing gendered about Jacob Sylvester’s decision to build a back garden bar in a shed last summer where he and his wife could entertain. “We didn’t go on holiday so we threw the money at a garden summerhouse instead.”

The structure, which is called The Staffie Tavern in tribute to their former pet, is 10ft x 10ft and cost around £3,500 to build it and kit it out like a pub. “It’s not somewhere where I go and hide; it’s for us to entertain.”

Sarah Lim: The story behind Merced’s ‘Little Snelling’ and other historic neighborhoods

As the weather is getting warmer and the days are getting longer, it is a great time to be outdoors to explore Merced’s historic neighborhoods.While one will be delighted at the sight of a stately Victorian home or a cute California bungalow, one will surely be intrigued by the disappearance of Merced’s first neighborhood.“Little Snelling” was the first neighborhood established in the new town of Merced shortly after Merced defeated Snelling to become the new county seat in November 1872.Many Snel...

As the weather is getting warmer and the days are getting longer, it is a great time to be outdoors to explore Merced’s historic neighborhoods.

While one will be delighted at the sight of a stately Victorian home or a cute California bungalow, one will surely be intrigued by the disappearance of Merced’s first neighborhood.

“Little Snelling” was the first neighborhood established in the new town of Merced shortly after Merced defeated Snelling to become the new county seat in November 1872.

Many Snelling residents packed up their stuff, businesses, and, in some cases, entire houses to relocate to Merced. They decided to establish their homes in an area between 13th and 15th streets and M and O streets and called it “Little Snelling.”

According to Louise Norvell (1883-1973), a longtime Merced resident and educator, “The Southern Pacific Railroad divides the town, and the western part (south of the tracks) was to have been the aristocratic part. …. All those Snelling people came and established their homes over there, and they had some very nice homes. The Silmans and the Inglesbys [sic] and the Robertsons and the Smyths and the Meanys all came to that section.”

It was considered a very upscale neighborhood with merchants and officials. Lemuel Hampton Silman, a stagecoach operator, moved his house built circa 1865 from Snelling to 632 W. 15th Street. Then, there was Merced County Sheriff Anthony J. Meany who took up his residence on 14th Street in Little Snelling.

These “aristocrats” would never want to miss any action on their social calendar; therefore, living near the center of social activities — the magnificent El Capitan Hotel — was ideal.

In addition, it was very convenient for them to gather in the barroom of the El Capitan Hotel after work then walk across the tracks and be home for dinner in no time.

Today, Little Snelling would have been considered less desirable because it would have been south of the tracks. Little Snelling eventually lost its prestige to the neighborhoods in north Merced, and its dilapidated buildings were razed to make room for Highway 99 in the 1960s and then for senior housing in the 1990s.

If the Southern Pacific Railroad (formerly Central Pacific) and the El Capitan Hotel made Little Snelling the most desirable residential district for the city folks, then Bear Creek and G Street served as the boundaries for idyllic suburban living. The first two neighborhoods that were developed outside of Merced city limits were the Bradley Addition and Ragsdale Addition.

The Crocker-Huffman Land and Water Company set aside a tract of 4,000 acres just outside of Merced’s eastern limit on G Street. It was called “The Bradley Addition” in honor of J. D. Bradley, manager of the Crocker-Huffman Company.

The soil was exceptionally rich for farming. It was platted into 10 and 20-acre lots and put on the market at a price ranging from $60 to $85 per acre. Experienced colonizer A. Jernberg was hired to promote the settlement. Within the first year, 48 pieces of the tract had been sold. Some of the settlers such as Fred W. Yokum planted orchards and vineyards while others grew alfalfa, the most profitable crop.

Settlers in the Bradley Addition had many of the advantages of living in town since the city extended the electric-lighting system to the neighborhood as well as the waterworks. The Kocher house at 117 E. 21st Street, for example, was supplied with pipe water from G Street. It was built in 1903 for Carl E. Kocher, a prominent merchant who operated a tin and hardware store. He served as the Merced City Treasurer from 1896 to 1904. The house is set back from the street, and the property extends to 22nd Street. The Kocher house is one of the few remaining buildings of the original Bradley Addition.

The Ragsdale Addition was originally known as Lot 59 of the Bradley Addition. This 52-acre parcel located just east of G Street and south of Bear Creek was purchased by James Ragsdale, a horse dealer, in 1920. Ragsdale and his wife, Fannie, made their home there. A Missouri native, Ragsdale settled in Merced County with his family in 1902 and invested in livery stables in Merced. He continued expanding his business until he had three of the largest livery stables, including the El Capitan Stables, in the county.

Ragsdale got into real estate and platted Lot 59 for subdivision in 1923; thus, the Ragsdale Addition was born. When Ragsdale placed the subdivision on the market, he found that the demand for homes was unprecedented. The model home at 2490 2nd Avenue may be the oldest house in the Ragsdale Addition. It was built in 1927. According to the advertisement on October 20, 1928, “San Joaquin valley [sic] contractors who have already inspected the home pronounce it one of the finest in standpoint of construction, architecture and modern equipment ever built in this section.”

In 2017, the Ragsdale Addition was designated as Merced’s first official Honorary Historic Neighborhood District.

For more history about Merced’s historic neighborhoods such as Chinatown, Mexican Colony, Spaghetti Acres, and South Merced, please visit the “Settlement of Merced County: From Homestead to Colonization” exhibit at the Courthouse Museum. It is on display until February 20.

On a separate note: Due to the rise in COVID-19 cases, the Merced County Historical Society annual membership meeting on Feb. 6 has been postponed to March. For more information, please contact the Courthouse Museum office at (209) 723-2401.

Meet Krista Snelling, President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank

Krista Snelling took the leadership role as President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank in March 2021. Learn more about Krista’s navigation of the community’s local bank through the pandemic, why she believes you should put your money where your life is, and what she’s looking forward to in 2022 as the Bank celebrates its 18th anniversary.What did you learn about Santa Cruz County Bank in your first 12 months at the helm?KS: I knew before my arrival that Santa Cruz County Bank had a reputation fo...

Krista Snelling took the leadership role as President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank in March 2021. Learn more about Krista’s navigation of the community’s local bank through the pandemic, why she believes you should put your money where your life is, and what she’s looking forward to in 2022 as the Bank celebrates its 18th anniversary.

What did you learn about Santa Cruz County Bank in your first 12 months at the helm?

KS: I knew before my arrival that Santa Cruz County Bank had a reputation for community engagement, but what I came to quickly discover is that the SCCB team is both passionate and 100% committed to our community. Community is the thread that connects us – to our clients, fellow colleagues, community partners, and neighbors. That commitment is in the Bank’s mission statement and I saw firsthand that it rings true on a very personal level. A great illustrative example of our commitment was the effort by the entire SCCB team to secure PPP funding for local businesses before the government funds were exhausted. Our team worked around the clock and saved over 50,000 jobs through the PPP program for local businesses – that’s an astounding number for a bank of our size and it maximized our available resources to the fullest extent. The challenges we’ve all experienced the last two years truly brought to light what community banks bring to the table.

I also immediately saw the benefits of the Bank’s hands-on decision making. This is a roll up your sleeves team with a direct approach to decision making and relationship building. Our relationships with our clients and community partners run deep – they are longstanding and meaningful. What makes our community bank unique is our ability to be creative, to understand our business clients’ needs, and to give those businesses access to decision makers. This is what business owners want.

What drew you to Santa Cruz County Bank in particular?

KS: Because of my years of experience understanding the role community banks play in the communities they serve, I knew I wanted to join a bank already operating under a tag line that exemplifies both the values and the benefits of community banks – Put your money where your life is. Community banks, like Santa Cruz County Bank, reinvest local dollars back into the community which in turn help create local jobs. Our reinvestment back into our community helps small businesses grow and lets local families thrive.

What excites you as you enter 2022, your second year at SCCB?

KS: I’m most excited about our plan to further unlock efficiencies within our processes and internal operations, all with the end result of positively impacting the client experience. We’ve uncovered and developed the means to deliver to clients using digital technology, and we’re adding products to meet the needs of our clients. Our focus has been heightened by the pandemic, which is driving digital transformation, because it necessitates the focus to meet our customers where they are, which is significantly remote. This excites me greatly.

We’re looking forward to serving all of our customers and performing at the highest levels. The feedback we hear from new clients has a consistent theme – the personal relationships and access they have with the SCCB team makes all the difference. We hear it all the time from people who made the switch; they know they have access to a relationship manager who can make a decision. That sets us apart from national institutions. Our clients are happier having moved to SCCB because they can get to the business of their business. We love that!

Another exciting realm for me is tracking the success of our expansion into new markets and meeting new clients. Our Monterey branch opened in January 2021, and the Monterey team is continuing to welcome new clients and community partnerships. We’ve also begun the remodel of our new location in Salinas, which is slated to open by the end of 2022. We’re already hearing from Salinas area businesses how much they’re looking forward to Santa Cruz County Bank being in their community.

What do you want a potential client to understand that would make them consider switching banks?

KS: I want potential clients to know that we’re here for them. Our processes and decision-making are all performed in-house, which results in timely and straight-forward approvals. Our lenders have years of experience and a working knowledge of local market conditions. Our mission is to find solutions to fit your needs and we get things done when other banks can’t. We will be there for you - we’ve proven that through the success of our support during the pandemic. Community banks prove that again and again through the personal relationships they foster.

“I’m humbled and inspired by the opportunity to lead Santa Cruz County Bank in 2022 as we expand into new markets and build upon the Bank’s legacy.”

Your arrival at SCCB was right during the pandemic. How did that feel?

KS: In hindsight, my arrival during Shelter in Place was perfectly timed for shaping digital and internal transformations. During the pandemic, businesses learned quickly that they needed to rapidly adopt and deploy in the digital space in order to transact their business and survive. Individuals who stayed home sought out digital technology for their banking needs. All the digital products and services we’ve had in place for years have been fully embraced and discovered during the pandemic. Also, as an essential business, we rapidly and adeptly pivoted without missing a beat, by deploying the Bank’s emergency disaster plans, which we’ve practiced and prepared for the past 18 years. When the pandemic hit, we moved more than half our workforce to safer remote spaces while our branches carefully remained open to serve the public.

I’m an extrovert, so on a personal level the pandemic has been a real challenge for me, especially not being able to get face to face consistently with our employees and the community. Now that things have opened up to a degree, I’m eager to attend events and see all the smiles that were hiding under the masks, and in 3D instead of on Zoom!

Are you enjoying the Santa Cruz area since your move here in March 2021?

KS: Absolutely! I take the coastal route to and from work each day, and every day it takes my breath away. We’ve lived here for a year, and the thrill of living in a place where we are surrounded by natural beauty, and in walking distance of the coastline, is never taken for granted. My entire family is enjoying the discovery of our beautiful outdoor spaces.

Some Friendly Exotic Pets In This Neck Of The Valley

If you have been to a few annual community events — such as the Hilmar Dairy Festival or the Christmas Musical at the Christian Life Center — you surely noticed a few camels on display, and maybe wondered where they came from.Well, it’s quite likely they came from Lloyd Pareira’s ranch.Most local residents know Pareira as the dairy farmer turned County Supervisor after he successfully ran for office in 2016. But some people may be surprised to learn that Pareira continues to manage a 500-acre ranch just ...

If you have been to a few annual community events — such as the Hilmar Dairy Festival or the Christmas Musical at the Christian Life Center — you surely noticed a few camels on display, and maybe wondered where they came from.

Well, it’s quite likely they came from Lloyd Pareira’s ranch.

Most local residents know Pareira as the dairy farmer turned County Supervisor after he successfully ran for office in 2016. But some people may be surprised to learn that Pareira continues to manage a 500-acre ranch just off Highway 59, halfway between Merced and Snelling, and it’s home to all kinds of animals, including large exotic pets.

There’s a yak, an emu, a couple of Zedonks, a few bison, and seven camels among a variety of more common Valley animals such as sheep, cattle, pigs, chickens, turkeys and pigeons. There’s also “Scrappy” the cat that keeps everything in check.

Pareira says the camels are his favorite pets. They include a bull, a baby gilding, and five lovely ladies.

“They are very friendly,” Pareira says. “They each cost about a $150 a month to feed. Less expensive than a horse.”

Pareira also breeds and sells the camels, and they mostly go to horse owners who have the space and resources to care for them. The price? Anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000, depending on age and gender.

They come with some interesting traits. Did you know that the Arabian dromedary single-humped camel can drink up to 30 gallons of water in 10 minutes?

They also have two sets of eye lashes.

And they can produce milk and diary products too.

Camels can live up to 30 to 40 years, and sometimes longer. They are curious, intelligent — and despite their tainted reputation as spitters — they can be incredibly nice to people.

Pareira’s family has lived in the Central Valley since 1918. His ranch is in the river bottom. He has been a farmer all his life. He grew up in the Hopeton area near Snelling. He graduated from Merced College with an A.S. in animal science, and then went on to further his studies at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, earning a B.S. in dairy science.

Pareira, and wife Babette, have been married for 27 years, and they have four grown children. As a father, Pareira was very involved in raising his children, along with tending to his own dairy farm.

These days, he rents out about 360 acres of his ranch to a corn farmer and dedicates about 20 acres to his home, a brook and his pet animals. Most of his time has pivoted to serving the community.

Pareira is well-known in the community for his active community support and spearheading efforts to fight homelessness, improve education, boost local health care, and bring attention to farming, water, transportation, and public safety issues.

He is also involved in setting forth business opportunities to create jobs and grow economic prosperity within the county and particularly for his District 4 that includes Ballico, Gustine, Cressey, Delhi, Hilmar, Snelling, Stevinson, Winton, and portions of Atwater.

At 58, Pareira shows no signs of slowing down, and in fact seems more committed as ever to improving the quality of life in Merced County and beyond.

And if that also means showing off a few friendly camels at a community event or a school classroom every once in a while, then so be it. He’s more than happy to share his love of animals.

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