Appliance Repair in Snelling, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Snelling, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Merced heat shatters record highs amid ‘out of the ordinary’ heat wave. How to stay safe

The heatwave scorching Merced and much of the Central Valley is shattering records set over a century ago and reaching potentially deadly heights, forecasters say.“It gets hot in the Valley every year, but this is something that’s out of the ordinary,” Kris Mattarochia, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Hanford office, told the Sun-Star.NWS forecasters project temper...

The heatwave scorching Merced and much of the Central Valley is shattering records set over a century ago and reaching potentially deadly heights, forecasters say.

“It gets hot in the Valley every year, but this is something that’s out of the ordinary,” Kris Mattarochia, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Hanford office, told the Sun-Star.

NWS forecasters project temperatures will peak Tuesday at 115 degrees. The prior heat record for that day was set in 1904, when temperatures reached 108 degrees.

“We’re forecasting a shattering of the record, to say the least,” Mattarochia said. “It would be a new all time record for the hottest temperature ever recorded (in Merced).”

While Tuesday is anticipated to represent the pinnacle of the heatwave, the record-setting temperature is sandwiched between other all-time highs. Monday’s 108-degree heat heat broke the 1904 record of 106.

Although Saturday and Sunday’s temperatures, each recorded at 106 degrees, those days didn’t break records set in 1903, although they only fell short by one or two degrees.

The rest of the week is anticipated to offer little to no respite. Wednesday’s forecast projects a high of 109 degrees, only declining slightly to 108 Thursday and 107 Friday. It’s possible more heat records could be set in the coming days, Mattarochia said.

“When it’s as hot as it is right now, a few degrees really isn’t going to make a difference,” Mattarochia said of the slight decrease in temperature over the coming days. Residents are advised to practice caution against the heat throughout the rest of the week, even after Tuesday’s extreme temperatures.

Originally set to expire Wednesday, the NWS extended its excessive heat warning through Friday evening as a result of the dangerously high temperatures.

Exacerbating the scorching daytime temperatures are nighttime lows that dip to only the mid 70-degree range. Warm nights offer overheated residents little time to recover from the heat before the next day’s temperatures rise anew. Individuals lacking access to air conditioning are especially susceptible.

“There’s going to be heat related illnesses. Everybody is at risk,” Mattarochia said. “It’s a very serious situation.”

To avoid heat stress or illness, Merced residents are advised to stay hydrated, avoid exposure to the heat outdoors and stay out of hot cars. When going outside, individuals should wear loose and light colored clothing, as well as void high energy activities during peak heat in the midday hours.

Children and pets shouldn’t be left in vehicles for any period of time, even with the windows down.

Cooling zones should be utilized by anyone without access to air conditioning. A list of cooling centers is available from the Merced County Office of Emergency Services.

Although they very young and the elderly are especially at risk for experiencing adverse health effects, Mattarochia said anyone can be susceptible to the heat when temperatures are as extreme as this week’s forecast.

“The risk is very high, and it’s for everybody. It doesn’t matter how healthy you are,” he said. “You could be a marathon runner, and if you’re out for an extended period of time, even 15 minutes … it could be quite dangerous.”

The 100-plus degree weather is expected to cool down to the high 90s over the weekend, but Mattarochia said it’s possible the heatwave will persist longer than currently projected. Forecasters are more confidently predicting relief to arrive by the end of the weekend or start of next week, bringing temperatures down to the low 90s.

This story was originally published September 6, 2022 12:09 PM.

Meet Krista Snelling, President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank

Krista Snelling took the leadership role as President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank in March 2021. Learn more about Krista’s navigation of the community’s local bank through the pandemic, why she believes you should put your money where your life is, and what she’s looking forward to in 2022 as the Bank celebrates its 18th anniversary.What did you learn about Santa Cruz County Bank in your first 12 months at the helm?KS: I knew before my arrival that Santa Cruz County Bank had a reputation fo...

Krista Snelling took the leadership role as President and CEO of Santa Cruz County Bank in March 2021. Learn more about Krista’s navigation of the community’s local bank through the pandemic, why she believes you should put your money where your life is, and what she’s looking forward to in 2022 as the Bank celebrates its 18th anniversary.

What did you learn about Santa Cruz County Bank in your first 12 months at the helm?

KS: I knew before my arrival that Santa Cruz County Bank had a reputation for community engagement, but what I came to quickly discover is that the SCCB team is both passionate and 100% committed to our community. Community is the thread that connects us – to our clients, fellow colleagues, community partners, and neighbors. That commitment is in the Bank’s mission statement and I saw firsthand that it rings true on a very personal level. A great illustrative example of our commitment was the effort by the entire SCCB team to secure PPP funding for local businesses before the government funds were exhausted. Our team worked around the clock and saved over 50,000 jobs through the PPP program for local businesses – that’s an astounding number for a bank of our size and it maximized our available resources to the fullest extent. The challenges we’ve all experienced the last two years truly brought to light what community banks bring to the table.

I also immediately saw the benefits of the Bank’s hands-on decision making. This is a roll up your sleeves team with a direct approach to decision making and relationship building. Our relationships with our clients and community partners run deep – they are longstanding and meaningful. What makes our community bank unique is our ability to be creative, to understand our business clients’ needs, and to give those businesses access to decision makers. This is what business owners want.

What drew you to Santa Cruz County Bank in particular?

KS: Because of my years of experience understanding the role community banks play in the communities they serve, I knew I wanted to join a bank already operating under a tag line that exemplifies both the values and the benefits of community banks – Put your money where your life is. Community banks, like Santa Cruz County Bank, reinvest local dollars back into the community which in turn help create local jobs. Our reinvestment back into our community helps small businesses grow and lets local families thrive.

What excites you as you enter 2022, your second year at SCCB?

KS: I’m most excited about our plan to further unlock efficiencies within our processes and internal operations, all with the end result of positively impacting the client experience. We’ve uncovered and developed the means to deliver to clients using digital technology, and we’re adding products to meet the needs of our clients. Our focus has been heightened by the pandemic, which is driving digital transformation, because it necessitates the focus to meet our customers where they are, which is significantly remote. This excites me greatly.

We’re looking forward to serving all of our customers and performing at the highest levels. The feedback we hear from new clients has a consistent theme – the personal relationships and access they have with the SCCB team makes all the difference. We hear it all the time from people who made the switch; they know they have access to a relationship manager who can make a decision. That sets us apart from national institutions. Our clients are happier having moved to SCCB because they can get to the business of their business. We love that!

Another exciting realm for me is tracking the success of our expansion into new markets and meeting new clients. Our Monterey branch opened in January 2021, and the Monterey team is continuing to welcome new clients and community partnerships. We’ve also begun the remodel of our new location in Salinas, which is slated to open by the end of 2022. We’re already hearing from Salinas area businesses how much they’re looking forward to Santa Cruz County Bank being in their community.

What do you want a potential client to understand that would make them consider switching banks?

KS: I want potential clients to know that we’re here for them. Our processes and decision-making are all performed in-house, which results in timely and straight-forward approvals. Our lenders have years of experience and a working knowledge of local market conditions. Our mission is to find solutions to fit your needs and we get things done when other banks can’t. We will be there for you - we’ve proven that through the success of our support during the pandemic. Community banks prove that again and again through the personal relationships they foster.

“I’m humbled and inspired by the opportunity to lead Santa Cruz County Bank in 2022 as we expand into new markets and build upon the Bank’s legacy.”

Your arrival at SCCB was right during the pandemic. How did that feel?

KS: In hindsight, my arrival during Shelter in Place was perfectly timed for shaping digital and internal transformations. During the pandemic, businesses learned quickly that they needed to rapidly adopt and deploy in the digital space in order to transact their business and survive. Individuals who stayed home sought out digital technology for their banking needs. All the digital products and services we’ve had in place for years have been fully embraced and discovered during the pandemic. Also, as an essential business, we rapidly and adeptly pivoted without missing a beat, by deploying the Bank’s emergency disaster plans, which we’ve practiced and prepared for the past 18 years. When the pandemic hit, we moved more than half our workforce to safer remote spaces while our branches carefully remained open to serve the public.

I’m an extrovert, so on a personal level the pandemic has been a real challenge for me, especially not being able to get face to face consistently with our employees and the community. Now that things have opened up to a degree, I’m eager to attend events and see all the smiles that were hiding under the masks, and in 3D instead of on Zoom!

Are you enjoying the Santa Cruz area since your move here in March 2021?

KS: Absolutely! I take the coastal route to and from work each day, and every day it takes my breath away. We’ve lived here for a year, and the thrill of living in a place where we are surrounded by natural beauty, and in walking distance of the coastline, is never taken for granted. My entire family is enjoying the discovery of our beautiful outdoor spaces.

Snelling man meets local hero who saved his life 65 years ago

Lloyd Fagundes, as a senior citizen, finally got to shake the hand of the man who saved his newborn life 65 years ago.The hero was none other than 95-year-old Snelling resident George Naumann, who was a volunteer firefighter in the right place, at the right time, one night back in February, 1956.In remembrance of his service to the community and the heroism on display back then, Naumann was honored by local leaders and Fagundes himself during a ceremony on Monday evening outside of the historic Snelling Fire Station where Nauma...

Lloyd Fagundes, as a senior citizen, finally got to shake the hand of the man who saved his newborn life 65 years ago.

The hero was none other than 95-year-old Snelling resident George Naumann, who was a volunteer firefighter in the right place, at the right time, one night back in February, 1956.

In remembrance of his service to the community and the heroism on display back then, Naumann was honored by local leaders and Fagundes himself during a ceremony on Monday evening outside of the historic Snelling Fire Station where Naumann once worked to keep residents safe.

It all started when Fagundes was just 7 months old. The baby was having trouble breathing, and it got to a point when the poor little thing was nearly suffocating. Frantic family members made an emergency call for help from the outskirts of Snelling, but they soon realized an ambulance drive to Mercy Hospital in Merced would take too long.

Firefighters Kenneth Finch and Naumann were on duty that evening, but the family was informed that they needed to make haste to a nearby landmark in order to meet up. They did, and Naumann was able to revive the little Baby Fagundes and help him continue to breathe for the trip to the hospital.

Naumann, a volunteer at the time, would go on to become a firefighter for Merced County, eventually moving on to become a district chief in 1984, before retiring in 1989.

As for Fagundes, it took 65 years for him to finally get the urge to seek out Naumann, and formally meet the man who saved his life so many years ago.

Merced County Supervisor Lloyd Pareira was on hand for Monday’s award ceremony, and he was astounded by the story.

“All this time goes by, and then a couple of months ago, that young little fella wanted to meet George,” Pareira said. “There just happened to be an event going on here in town [at Bud’s Place], and on the way back, they stopped by the party, and George was able to meet this young man whose life he had saved all those years ago.”

However, to add other twist to the story, Fagundes revealed on Monday night that the occasion wasn’t exactly the first time he had met Naumann over the past 65 years.

There was that one other time, Fagundes said.

Another time when Naumann, like an angel, extended a helpful hand.

And then Fagundes shared the following story to the delight of those in attendance:

“In the late 1970s to the early ’80s, I was playing on a softball team in Merced. Me and a buddy were playing a softball game, and we went and got some beer, because we knew some girls that were our age that had their own apartment, and so we took the beer over to their apartment. …

“So when we left the apartment, we went out the back way down Arboleda, but this Sheriff’s car pulled us over. Out of the Sheriff’s car comes a sheriff and a fireman. They said they stopped us because there had been some firebugs in the area.”

The fireman was actually George Nauman, though Fagundes didn’t know anything about him at the time.

The story continued: “So we get out of the car, and we hand our IDs to the the Sheriff, and as we’re doing that, George asks me, ‘Who’s your father?’ … and I go: ‘Tony Fagundes,’and he goes: ‘Oh I know Tony. … When you were a baby, I took you to the hospital.’ …

“And so while the Sheriff was lecturing us a little bit, George goes: ‘You know, young boys like this, playing softball, hanging out drinking beer, that sounds pretty American to me. Let’s let these kids go. I think they’ll be alright.’ … So I got two reasons to thank George!”

On Monday night, Nauman was honored with two plaques, with one destined to be displayed inside the Snelling Museum to commemorate the life-saving act carried out by both Nauman and Finch. One includes the original news article about the 1956 event as it appeared in the Merced Sun-Star. Another will include a recent picture of the two friends by a County Times photographer.

Some Friendly Exotic Pets In This Neck Of The Valley

If you have been to a few annual community events — such as the Hilmar Dairy Festival or the Christmas Musical at the Christian Life Center — you surely noticed a few camels on display, and maybe wondered where they came from.Well, it’s quite likely they came from Lloyd Pareira’s ranch.Most local residents know Pareira as the dairy farmer turned County Supervisor after he successfully ran for office in 2016. But some people may be surprised to learn that Pareira continues to manage a 500-acre ranch just ...

If you have been to a few annual community events — such as the Hilmar Dairy Festival or the Christmas Musical at the Christian Life Center — you surely noticed a few camels on display, and maybe wondered where they came from.

Well, it’s quite likely they came from Lloyd Pareira’s ranch.

Most local residents know Pareira as the dairy farmer turned County Supervisor after he successfully ran for office in 2016. But some people may be surprised to learn that Pareira continues to manage a 500-acre ranch just off Highway 59, halfway between Merced and Snelling, and it’s home to all kinds of animals, including large exotic pets.

There’s a yak, an emu, a couple of Zedonks, a few bison, and seven camels among a variety of more common Valley animals such as sheep, cattle, pigs, chickens, turkeys and pigeons. There’s also “Scrappy” the cat that keeps everything in check.

Pareira says the camels are his favorite pets. They include a bull, a baby gilding, and five lovely ladies.

“They are very friendly,” Pareira says. “They each cost about a $150 a month to feed. Less expensive than a horse.”

Pareira also breeds and sells the camels, and they mostly go to horse owners who have the space and resources to care for them. The price? Anywhere from $5,000 to $10,000, depending on age and gender.

They come with some interesting traits. Did you know that the Arabian dromedary single-humped camel can drink up to 30 gallons of water in 10 minutes?

They also have two sets of eye lashes.

And they can produce milk and diary products too.

Camels can live up to 30 to 40 years, and sometimes longer. They are curious, intelligent — and despite their tainted reputation as spitters — they can be incredibly nice to people.

Pareira’s family has lived in the Central Valley since 1918. His ranch is in the river bottom. He has been a farmer all his life. He grew up in the Hopeton area near Snelling. He graduated from Merced College with an A.S. in animal science, and then went on to further his studies at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, earning a B.S. in dairy science.

Pareira, and wife Babette, have been married for 27 years, and they have four grown children. As a father, Pareira was very involved in raising his children, along with tending to his own dairy farm.

These days, he rents out about 360 acres of his ranch to a corn farmer and dedicates about 20 acres to his home, a brook and his pet animals. Most of his time has pivoted to serving the community.

Pareira is well-known in the community for his active community support and spearheading efforts to fight homelessness, improve education, boost local health care, and bring attention to farming, water, transportation, and public safety issues.

He is also involved in setting forth business opportunities to create jobs and grow economic prosperity within the county and particularly for his District 4 that includes Ballico, Gustine, Cressey, Delhi, Hilmar, Snelling, Stevinson, Winton, and portions of Atwater.

At 58, Pareira shows no signs of slowing down, and in fact seems more committed as ever to improving the quality of life in Merced County and beyond.

And if that also means showing off a few friendly camels at a community event or a school classroom every once in a while, then so be it. He’s more than happy to share his love of animals.

Weather Service Reports Near Record Heat on Labor Day and Tuesday for the San Joaquin Valley – Yosemite Valley High Temps Up To 110 Degrees

Mariposa projected high temperature for Monday: 104 degrees, Tuesday: 107 degreesOakhurst projected high temperature for Monday: 106 degrees, Tuesday: 109 degreesYosemite Valley projected high temperature for Monday: 109 degrees, Tuesday: 110 degreesSeptember 5, 2022 - The National Weather Service Hanford Office reports near record heat is expected in the San Joaquin Valley today and Tuesday.High temperatures i...

Mariposa projected high temperature for Monday: 104 degrees, Tuesday: 107 degreesOakhurst projected high temperature for Monday: 106 degrees, Tuesday: 109 degreesYosemite Valley projected high temperature for Monday: 109 degrees, Tuesday: 110 degrees

September 5, 2022 - The National Weather Service Hanford Office reports near record heat is expected in the San Joaquin Valley today and Tuesday.

High temperatures in the San Joaquin Valley both this afternoon and Tuesday afternoon will be 109 to 114 degrees.

An Excessive Heat Warning is in effect for lower elevations in Central California until 8 PM PDT Thursday evening.

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGENational Weather Service Hanford CA351 AM PDT Mon Sep 5 2022West Side Mountains north of 198-Los Banos - Dos Palos-Merced -Madera - Mendota-Planada - Le Grand - Snelling-Coalinga - Avenal-West Side of Fresno and Kings Counties-Caruthers - San Joaquin -Selma-Fresno-Clovis-West Side Mountains South of 198-Buttonwillow - Lost Hills - I5-Delano-Wasco-Shafter-Hanford -Corcoran - Lemoore-Visalia - Porterville - Reedley-Buena Vista-Bakersfield-Southeast San Joaquin Valley-South End San Joaquin Valley-Mariposa Madera Foothills-Fresno-Tulare Foothills-South End Sierra Foothills-Yosemite Valley-Kern River Valley-Frazier Mountain Communities-Indian Wells Valley-Mojave Desert Slopes-Mojave Desert-Including the cities of San Luis Reservoir, Los Banos, Merced,Madera, Atwater, Planada, Lake Mcclure, Le Grand, Avenal,Coalinga, Lemoore Station, Five Points, Kettleman City, Selma,Sanger, Parlier, Kingsburg, Kerman, Fresno, Blackwells Corner,McKittrick, Lost Hills, Buttonwillow, Delano, Wasco, Alpaugh,Shafter, Hanford, Lemoore, Corcoran, Goshen, Visalia, Tulare,Porterville, Taft, Bakersfield, Richgrove, Lamont, Arvin,El Portal, Mariposa, Millerton Lake, Yosemite Valley,Lake Isabella, Kernville, Frazier Park, Inyokern, Ridgecrest,Mojave, Rosamond, California City, Randsburg, and Edwards AFB351 AM PDT Mon Sep 5 2022...EXCESSIVE HEAT WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL 8 PM PDTTHURSDAY...* WHAT...High temperatures in the San Joaquin Valley 106 to 114  degrees. Maximum temperatures in the Kern County desert 106 to  114 degrees. High temperatures in the Lower Sierra foothills,  Yosemite Valley, Kern River Valley, and Coastal Range 105 to  112 degrees.* WHERE...San Joaquin Valley, Coastal Range, Lower Sierra  foothills, Yosemite Valley, Kern River Valley, and Kern County  desert.* WHEN...Until 8 PM PDT Thursday.* IMPACTS...Extreme heat will significantly increase the  potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those  working or participating in outdoor activities.PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...Drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room, stay outof the sun, and check up on relatives and neighbors. Youngchildren and pets should never be left unattended in vehiclesunder any circumstances.Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. Whenpossible reschedule strenuous activities to early morning orevening. Know the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing whenpossible. To reduce risk during outdoor work, the OccupationalSafety and Health Administration recommends scheduling frequentrest breaks in shaded or air conditioned environments. Anyoneovercome by heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location.Heat stroke is an emergency! Call 9 1 1.

Source: NWS

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