Appliance Repair in Selma, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Selma, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Selma, CA

Hanford Bullpups beat Grizzlies in close thriller over Selma

Top-seeded Hanford High School advanced to the CIF Central Section Division II semifinals with a thrilling 5-4 victory over the eighth-seeded Selma High School Bears on Friday afternoon in Hanford.In Friday's game, Hanford's Duregan Davis hit a sacrifice fly to bring in Kinzi Ayala with the eventual winning run in the bottom of the sixth inning. Ayala had walked to start the ral...

Top-seeded Hanford High School advanced to the CIF Central Section Division II semifinals with a thrilling 5-4 victory over the eighth-seeded Selma High School Bears on Friday afternoon in Hanford.

In Friday's game, Hanford's Duregan Davis hit a sacrifice fly to bring in Kinzi Ayala with the eventual winning run in the bottom of the sixth inning. Ayala had walked to start the rally and advanced on a single by Ayden Stone, who had two hits in the game and a bunt single by Nyseth Gonzalez.

But winning pitcher Lily Garcia, whose mother grew up in Selma, struck out the side in the top of the seventh to end the game. Garcia, who is headed to Cal State Fullerton, finished with 11 strikeouts and no walks.

Selma opened the scoring in the top half of the first inning when Jadyn Hurtado hit Garcia’s fifth pitch of the game for a single and went to second on a sacrifice bunt by Marissa Vasquez. Hurtado scored on a sharp single to left by Khamara Dement, who went to second on the throw but was stranded there.

The top-seeded Bullpups answered with five hits in the bottom of the inning and scoring three runs. They added another run in the second inning to take a 4-1 lead but left the bases loaded.

After Garcia had retired 11 in a row, Selma started their comeback on a Gaby Zapata leadoff single in the fifth before Bianca Estrada reached on a sacrifice bunt and a throwing error. Starting pitcher Elissa Olea, who had moved to the designated player spot in the ninth spot in the Selma batting order, hit Garcia’s first pitch into the gap in right center for a two-run double.

Selma tied the game in the sixth after Dement led off with her second hit of the game. The super sophomore stole second, went to third on a Hannah Garcia groundout and scored on a two-out wild pitch.

“We got some good hits and some runners on when we needed it,” said Hanford High head coach Donnie Fagundes, who last guided the Bullpups to a section title in 2016. Lily is pitching lights out. She really is.”

The coach figured Madera would win its quarterfinal game. “Whoever it is, it is.”

During his postgame interview, Selma High head coach Chris Tapia had tears in his eyes. The list of nine seniors includes his oldest daughter Lyla, a backup infielder.

“I was really happy with the way they fought back. They fought until the last out. Just didn’t have enough magic left,” he said.

Selma had won the first round game over Redwood 3-2, tying the contest in a dramatic fashion.

The Bears were trailing 2-1 in the seventh when Redwood decided to intentionally walk Dement, who scored from first when the Ranger left fielder had dropped a potential game ending fly ball off the bat of Hannah Garcia.

Marytza Morales, who had been in a slump, hit a game winning homer over the left field fence.

Tapia started with this team as seventh graders. “It is pretty emotional,” he said.

Hanford improved to 21-6 while Selma finished at 15-8-1. Both teams were 10-0 in league play.

The Bullpups will host Madera in Wednesday’s semifinals. The Coyotes eliminated Liberty of Madera 4-2 in another quarterfinal matchup.

In the other semifinal game, 11th-seeded Kingsburg will travel to Fresno to face Bullard.

The winners will advance to the Central Section final game on either Friday or Saturday at Fresno State’s Margie Wright Diamond. A schedule for the six section championship games had not been released, as of press time.

1st remote air traffic control center in US to be in Alabama

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — A company is seeking to build the country’s first-ever remote air traffic control center, which could handle traffic for multiple airports, on the site of an old Air Force base in Alabama, a newspaper reports.Advanced ATC Inc., an air traffic control academy based in Valdosta, Georgia, announced plans Thursday to invest about $4.7 million at Craig Air Field, now a public airport in Dallas County, just southeast of Selma, the Selma Times-Journal ...

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — A company is seeking to build the country’s first-ever remote air traffic control center, which could handle traffic for multiple airports, on the site of an old Air Force base in Alabama, a newspaper reports.

Advanced ATC Inc., an air traffic control academy based in Valdosta, Georgia, announced plans Thursday to invest about $4.7 million at Craig Air Field, now a public airport in Dallas County, just southeast of Selma, the Selma Times-Journal reported. The company also announced it will establish an international training academy at the site.

The remote tower uses cameras, real-time video and other features, allowing air traffic controllers to remotely accomplish the duties they would previously have carried out in a traditional control tower, the company said.

“Remote towers represent an important and innovative step in airspace modernization efforts in the U.S., and I’m excited to see Advanced ATC establish its pioneering operation at Craig Field,” said Greg Canfield, secretary of the Alabama Department of Commerce.

While the technology is gaining a foothold in Europe, it is relatively new to the United States, Dan Cunningham, chief operator officer for Advanced ATC, told The Associated Press.

“Remote tower systems are brand new in the United States,” Cunningham said. He said the tower will be part of their training academy at the site — where they anticipate training students from around the globe — but will need approval from the Federal Aviation Administration before handling air traffic in the United States.

The Federal Aviation Administration has not approved any remote tower systems for use. But Cunningham said remote towers at two airports are currently going through the evaluation process, and “our process will be the same.”

Advanced ATC officials said the remote tower will be equipped to support aviation expansion and provide air traffic control services for up to 40 airports in the U.S.

“The outlook for small airports to be able to afford ATC service without the requirement to build a $5 million to $10 million control tower is now available with the advancement of camera and satellite technologies changing almost daily,” Cunningham said. “The Selma RTC will be the catalyst for this historic change in the United States.”

Culture shaper: Alicia Garcia fights for a cause

Alicia Garcia has had a lot of success as a member of the Fresno Pacific Sunbirds track and field team during her career. While Garcia, a Selma native, is proud of her achievements as a javelin thrower, she is prouder of her work off the field helping fight human trafficking.Garcia recalls that attending event with her sister, who works for the Central Valley Justice Coalition, helped shape her passion to fight for the cause.“I would attend fundraisers they would have, and I didn’t know much about what human traffic...

Alicia Garcia has had a lot of success as a member of the Fresno Pacific Sunbirds track and field team during her career. While Garcia, a Selma native, is proud of her achievements as a javelin thrower, she is prouder of her work off the field helping fight human trafficking.

Garcia recalls that attending event with her sister, who works for the Central Valley Justice Coalition, helped shape her passion to fight for the cause.

“I would attend fundraisers they would have, and I didn’t know much about what human trafficking was, I asked her about it. When I would go to their presentations, I was really intrigued about the amount of stuff I didn’t know. It bothered me that I didn’t much about it,” Garcia said. “I learned how big of an issue it was. Getting to talk to the people in the organization and how amazing they are and the work they do, I wanted to be involved.”

Not only did Garcia become involved by volunteering, but she also helped the Central Valley Justice Coalition start a youth-based organization in 2020, called Students Ending Exploitation.

“I learned that Fresno County is a lot more vulnerable than people think especially with Highway 99 going up and down California. I think a lot of people don’t know how it impacts are cities in Fresno County and when I talk to my friends, I realize that a lot of us thought the same way,” Garcia said. “Going through the coalition and training it helped me become aware with knowledge I could spread to my peers so they can help someone if they ever saw someone in that situation.”

Garcia has been a student-athlete at Fresno Pacific for the past two years, and while she works hard to maintain her from in her event, she also says that she is trying to be more than an athlete.

“I think a lot of time athletes struggle about their identity only as an athlete. We are not just athletes, there is a whole lot that we do outside,” Garcia said. “I always wanted to do something that is not just for myself and try to do something that is worth something and beyond me. My work is beyond me. Of course, I want to help as many people as I can and make people aware of the issue but if I could help one person and I know I made a significant impact there that is more than enough for me.”

Garcia said that her coach tells preaches his athletes to be leaders on campus and be culture shapers.

“That is something our coaches really impacted me with, and I always keep that in mind. I started a club last January, I brought students ending exploitation to FPU and I started my own club so starting with that and bringing in officers who were willing to help me build the club, I couldn’t have done it without them,” Garcia said. “Knowing that people are willing to help support you especially starting something new. It is a hard issue to talk about, it is not light because it is a heavy issue. But being able to find ways to get together and spread awareness is pretty good to have projects. FPU is open to our club and I am glad it was so easy to start the club and have support.”

Garcia also has been shining as a javelin thrower since she began her track and field career in the Fall of 2020. Working as student on the campus of FPU, she met Ray Hansen, the throws coach for the Sunbirds. It was the chance meeting between the two that helped Garcia become a walk-on student-athlete.

“Coach Hansen came through my window at work and asked me what sport I play. I told him I don’t play any sports anymore, but I played softball my whole life,” Garcia said. He said have you heard of the javelin. He said why don’t I go out and try it one day and come out to one our practices. I got advice from my family and went out to tryout. Coach Hansen said he saw I could do good. I went out and did a lot better than expected. My goal for this season is to go out and keep growing and do better.”

Garcia had two first-place finishes during the 2021 season and as quickly fallen in love with the Javelin event.

“I think it has to do that it is a throwing event. I played softball my whole life and there is a correlation there. I like the individual aspect and the team aspect,” Garcia said. “I always tell my friends that when I throw the javelin and I know I throw it right it feels so good. It reminds me of when you hit a softball at the right spot, and it takes off. It is the best feeling at practice when you do something right and the flight is effortless, and I like that feeling. Last season it was fun to surprise myself because I am so new at it.”

At FPU, Garcia is a journalism major and hopes to one day become a sports journalist. It is something that she fell in love with as a kid.

“When I was nine, I would write questions in my notebook and go around asking my family as if I was interviewing them. Ever since then I knew I wanted to be one,” Garcia said. “As I grew older in High school I through I’d like to be a sport journalist because I love sports and I feel like the news can get a little heavy.”

At FPU, Garcia works with the athletics department and even has her own weekly segment where she picks top plays of the week.

“When I started my top plays of the week it was scary at first to be in front of the camera because I had never done that. I had to pull myself out of my comfort zone,” Garcia said. “That excited me because it would make me grow. I feel like now that after working on those it has really helped me and solidify this is what I want to do, and I love promoting the athletes at FPU. As an athlete myself, we don’t do it for recognition we do it because we love it. At the same time, it does feel good to get the recognition when something good happens. I have appreciation for the work that media relations do, and I wanted to be on the other end of that and promote the athletes at my school. It’s fun now because athletes say I want to make Alicia’s Top Plays of the week. I really have fun with it.”

Garcia said that after the semester she will be moving down to Los Angeles after she got accepted into a semester in L.A. Program.

“I got accepted to semester LA through a college called Columbia college of Chicago. They do a program and helps network and get internships,” Garcia said. “They have an L.A. Speakers course where they bring in speakers, and their faculty is people who have made it in media.”

While she may be heading to L.A. in the near future, she said that she will always be a small-town girl at heart.

“Selma is such a small town, everyone knows everybody. I think being form a small town it is inspiring seeing other people with work that they do,” Garcia said. “People from Selma branch out and do other things that involve leadership. I wanted to do that. To be able to know that people coming from Selma do things bigger than this town is what I want to do.”

Selma High principal publishes book about COVID-19 experience

SELMA, Calif. (KFSN) -- After a near-death experience with COVID-19, a Central Valley principal is sharing his story about his fight with the virus.Today, Principal Scott Pickle walks around Selma High School with a smile on his face, but there's always a thought in the back of his mind."I honestly thought that I was living out my final days," said Dr. Pickle. "My condition was just spiraling downhill."In January of 2021, when he was principal at Hanford High, Pickle went to the hospital after testing...

SELMA, Calif. (KFSN) -- After a near-death experience with COVID-19, a Central Valley principal is sharing his story about his fight with the virus.

Today, Principal Scott Pickle walks around Selma High School with a smile on his face, but there's always a thought in the back of his mind.

"I honestly thought that I was living out my final days," said Dr. Pickle. "My condition was just spiraling downhill."

In January of 2021, when he was principal at Hanford High, Pickle went to the hospital after testing positive for COVID-19. He spent two days on a gurney in a hallway and then was moved to a room when his oxygen levels weren't improving.

"I remember thinking like, 'This is the way it's going to go down,' and I felt just the sinking feeling," he said.

Pickle was put on the antiviral drug Remdesivir, and he recalled his doctor wanting to put him on a ventilator.

"I said, 'No, you're not going to. I'm not going to die with a tube in my throat. Please don't intubate me. Give the medicine a chance," Dr. Pickle shared.

Hours later, Pickle's vitals started improving.

After eight days of worrying if the hospital was the last place he was going to see, Pickle was sent back home to finally be with his family, and finish his recovery.

That's when he realized he needed to tell his story.

"I journaled on my phone. I sent myself emails, and I was journaling all the things that were going on," he said.

The book is called "Upright."

"Every time they put me back, my lungs...it was such pain," Pickle said. "So I sat upright in the hospital."

It's almost 200 pages.

Half of the book is about the mental and physical struggle of being in the hospital, and the other half is a reflection on what he thought, at the time, would be his last days.

Pickle said some of the questions he reflected on included: "Have I done right by people? Are my kids gonna be proud of me?"

Pickle hopes the book leaves people with a sense of hope and compassion.

"Upright" is now available on Amazon.

Prayers needed for teen badly hurt while trying to rescue others from collision near Selma

It’s been just over a week since parts of the Central Valley got hit with a storm that delivered hail, which caused a chain reaction crash near Selma.It also resulted in a good Samaritan pinned under a car.FOX26 News learned Tuesday that good Samaritan is 17-year-old Madison Vasquez, who remains in a coma.She had been in a car with her boyfriend Adrian Chavez, and his parents last Monday, as they were driving home along Manning Avenue, just after a hailstorm.They noticed a truck had crashed into a tree....

It’s been just over a week since parts of the Central Valley got hit with a storm that delivered hail, which caused a chain reaction crash near Selma.

It also resulted in a good Samaritan pinned under a car.

FOX26 News learned Tuesday that good Samaritan is 17-year-old Madison Vasquez, who remains in a coma.

She had been in a car with her boyfriend Adrian Chavez, and his parents last Monday, as they were driving home along Manning Avenue, just after a hailstorm.

They noticed a truck had crashed into a tree.

“We pulled over,” said Chavez. “We backed up to the truck to see if he needed help or anything. And then, by the time we were walking back to the car, the car was already coming towards us and hit us.”

Madison wound up pinned under a car and it took a number of people to get her face up and out of harm’s way.

Chavez’s mom was hurt too; She was released from a hospital over the weekend.

But more than a week later, Madison remains in a coma at Community Regional Medical Center with internal bleeding, six broken ribs, a rod in her femur, a pin in her knee, and a shattered pelvis, according to her mom, Brandie Vasquez.

She says it was Madison’s twin sister, Hope, called her to say there had been an accident.

She thanks the strangers who stopped to help.

“I already found one guy that helped her,” he said. “To me, he’s my hero.”

But a second person remains a mystery.

“He got on his knees and started praying with Madison. I don’t know, nobody knows of him, or who he is," Vasquez said.

She says prayers continue helping her daughter improve. They’re now asking others to lift up the Sanger West sophomore, too.

“I have faith that’s the only thing that’s been keeping her here with us. All the prayer," Vasquez says.

Madison’s family has started a GoFundMe to help cover any expenses insurance won’t.

You can find a link to the GoFundMe, here.

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