Appliance Repair in Santa Rita Park, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Santa Rita Park, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Santa Rita Park, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Santa Rita Park, CA

A $13 organic red wine with verve and spirit? Pour us a glass — or two.

What a great lineup this week! We start with a moderately priced red blend from Argentina that is not only organic, but made with no added sulfites. Added sulfites are a third-rail type of issue in wine, as sulfur dioxide helps prevent all kinds of spoilage in bottle. This Domaine Bousquet shows that quality wine can be made in quantity without adding sulfur.We also have two California wines following a refreshing trend I highlighted recently with Mary Taylor Wines and Obvious Wines — showing their wines’ origin and charac...

What a great lineup this week! We start with a moderately priced red blend from Argentina that is not only organic, but made with no added sulfites. Added sulfites are a third-rail type of issue in wine, as sulfur dioxide helps prevent all kinds of spoilage in bottle. This Domaine Bousquet shows that quality wine can be made in quantity without adding sulfur.

We also have two California wines following a refreshing trend I highlighted recently with Mary Taylor Wines and Obvious Wines — showing their wines’ origin and character at an affordable price without pretense or ego. If you would like to explore California’s expressions of chardonnay and pinot noir without breaking the bank, look to Windemere wines. Be warned, though — you will want to explore more.

We finish with two sauvignon blancs from the Loire Valley in France. These wines reflect recent price inflation but show how we can find value by looking for quality in neighboring regions to the stars.

Domaine Bousquet produced my No. 1 “greatest value” of 2020, with its Natural Origins Malbec in a three-liter box. The winery is back with a line of organic wines with no added sulfites, called Virgen. This red blend is malbec, cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc. It is bright and lively, with verve and spirit. A Virgen Malbec at the same price is just entering this market. Both are splendid values. Organic, vegan. Alcohol by volume: 14.3 percent. BW: 440 grams (Light).

Imported by WISD; distributed in the District and Maryland by Opici, in Virginia by Virginia Imports: Available in the District at Classy Corks Wine & Spirits, Magruder’s, Odd Provisions, Yes Organic Market (various locations). Available in Maryland at A&A Wine & Spirits in Gambrills; Christos Discount Liquors in Ferndale; House of Liquors in Westminster; Lakefront Fine Wine & Spirits in Frederick; New Team Spirits in Cockeysville; Quarry Wine & Spirits in Baltimore. Available in Virginia at Friendly City Food Co-Op in Harrisonburg; Sprouts Farmers Market in Herndon; Wegmans (various locations); Whole Foods Market (various locations, coming soon).

Terrific Cali pinot under $20 that speaks not only of the grape but of its place of origin is hard to find. This beauty has the dark cherry and boysenberry flavors with cola spice and wild herbs that says Santa Barbara County to me. If we were to parse Santa Maria Valley versus Santa Rita Hills, we’d probably have to pay a bit more. But we can compare it with the very fine Windemere Sonoma County Pinot Noir ($19), which is lighter and more delicate in body and a bit more tart in flavor. Outstanding values. ABV: 14.5 percent. BW: 515 grams (Average).

Distributed by DMV: Available in the District at Lee Towers Market, Rodman’s. Available in Maryland at Bay Ridge Wine & Spirits, Bella’s, Eastport Liquors in Annapolis; the Breadery in Catonsville; Canton Crossing Wine + Spirits in Baltimore; Colonial Liquors in La Plata; Kent Towne Liquors in Chester; Mt. Airy Liquors in Mt. Airy; Old Farm Liquors in Frederick; Snider’s Super Foods in Silver Spring; Tiger Wine & Spirits in Towson.

Windemere gives us the opportunity to compare Sonoma and Santa Barbara counties with chardonnay as well as pinot noir. With the chards, Sonoma offers gossamer texture and filigree. At first, it seems there’s not much to it. But each sip reveals a different nuance. You’ll have to pay attention to understand what it’s trying to say to you. The Santa Barbara chard is more straightforward, a bit talkative. You know what it’s all about on the first sip. ABV: 14.5 percent. BW: 590 grams (Average).

Distributed by DMV: Available in the District at Lee Towers Market, Rodman’s. Available in Maryland at Bay Ridge Wine & Spirits, Bella’s, Eastport Liquors in Annapolis; the Breadery in Catonsville; Canton Crossing Wine + Spirits in Baltimore; Colonial Liquors in La Plata; Kent Towne Liquors in Chester; Mt. Airy Liquors in Mt. Airy; Old Farm Liquors in Frederick; Snider’s Super Foods in Silver Spring; Tiger Wine & Spirits in Towson.

The Touraine appellation in France’s Loire Valley is famous for affordable sauvignon blanc for occasions when we don’t want to splurge on the more famous wines of Sancerre. A significant increase of more than 10 percent over the 2019 vintage pushes this wine closer to sancerre in price — or at least, closer to where sancerre was a year ago. The quality is still there, a great expression of the mineral side of sauvignon that could fool you to mistake it as a sancerre if you didn’t see the label. ABV: 12.5 percent. BW: 530 grams (Average).

Imported by Artisans & Vines, distributed in the District and Maryland by Artisans & Vines, in Virginia by LK Wine Tours & Sales: Available in the District at Classy Corks Wine & Spirits, Cleveland Park Wine and Spirits, Morris Miller Wine & Liquor, Rodman’s, Schneider’s of Capitol Hill. Available in Maryland at Bella’s in Annapolis; Bradley Food & Beverage, Georgetown Square Wine and Beer in Bethesda; Downtown Crown Wine and Beer, Finewine.com in Gaithersburg; Old Farm Liquors in Frederick; Rodman’s in White Flint. Available in Virginia at Aldie Peddler in Aldie; Balducci’s in Alexandria; Murphy Beverage in Winchester.

This wine is everything you expect sancerre to be — ripe sauvignon blanc flavors of nectarine and quince expressed through the kimmeridgian limestone soils of the region. Think minerals and briny seafood. Given sancerre’s popularity in restaurants, this wine primarily appears on wine lists. ABV: 13.5 percent. BW: 490 grams (Light).

Imported by Kobrand; distributed in the District and Maryland by RNDC, in Virginia by Virginia Imports: Available in the District at Belga Cafe, Bobby Van’s Grill, Bobby Van’s Steakhouse, Connecticut Avenue Wine & Liquor, the Graham, the Palm. Available in Virginia at Bazin’s on Church in Vienna, Cafe Montmartre in Reston; Landini Brothers in Alexandria.

Availability information is based on distributor records. Wines might not be in stock at every listed store and might be sold at additional stores. Prices are approximate. Check Winesearcher.com to verify availability, or ask a favorite wine store to order through a distributor.

Correction: A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to the Domaine Bousquet Virgen Organic Red Blend 2020 as being Chilean; it is from Argentina. This version has been corrected.

Kentucky Derby Festival touring parade will visit 30+ neighborhoods. Here's the route

One of the biggest, and newest, Kentucky Derby Festival events is almost here.New in 2021, the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade returns on Saturday, April 2 and it will travel around the community.With around a dozen units, the traveling display will cover several miles and drive through more tha...

One of the biggest, and newest, Kentucky Derby Festival events is almost here.

New in 2021, the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade returns on Saturday, April 2 and it will travel around the community.

With around a dozen units, the traveling display will cover several miles and drive through more than 30 neighborhoods around Louisville and Jefferson County.

“We want the entire community to feel a part of the Derby Festival celebration,” Matt Gibson, Kentucky Derby Festival President & CEO said in a news release. “Traveling around the city helps us reach fans in a whole new way. We hope to see everyone lining their sidewalks again this year as we kick off our month-long celebration.”

The parade will travel around the community from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (rain or shine). These are some of the areas and neighborhoods where the touring parade will travel:

The timing of when the parade arrives at each area will be pending traffic and logistics as it moves through the community. It will be traveling at about 15 mph to give residents a chance to see it. A complete list of the streets and areas along the touring parade route is posted online at KDF.org/parade.

The touring parade will feature:

Fans along the route are encouraged to decorate their homes and neighborhoods. The Kentucky Derby Festival invites residents to line the sidewalks as the parade travels through the community. Fans can share photos of the Zoeller Pump Company Traveling Parade on social media using the hashtags #KyDerbyFestival and #LouisvilleLove as part of this year’s festivities.

“For more than 83 years the Zoeller Company has called Louisville home," said Dwight C. Newton, Zoeller Pump Company Chief People Officer. "We love this city and all of our Team members, customers, suppliers and shareholders ... this partnership is just one way we can give a little back.”

Here's what else to know about the 2022 Kentucky Derby Festival's Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade:

When is the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade?

The touring parade will be held Saturday, April 2 (rain or shine).

Where is the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade?

The parade will travel through more than 30 neighborhoods around Louisville and Jefferson County, including the Hallmark, Park DuValle, Parkland, Chickasaw, Shawnee, Russell, Parkland, California, Limerick, Old Louisville, Smoketown/Shelby Park, Germantown, Highlands, Tyler Park, Deer Park, Belknap, Hayfield Dundee, Bashford Manor, Newburg, Highview, Okolona, Auburndale, Kenwood Hills, Iroquois Park, Cloverleaf, Hazelwood, Beechmont and Highland Park neighborhoods.

What will I see during the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade?

Fans will see four inflatable balloon characters, including Zoeller Pump Company (Goldie Pegasus), Buddy the Dinosaur, Brainy Smurf, and Daniel Tiger, various Festival VIPS, including the 2022 Royal Court riding the Derby City Express, specialty units including the Kosair Shriner’s Calliope and more.

How much does it cost to attend the Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade?

It's free to attend!

You may like:The premier Kentucky Derby Festival Spring Fashion Show is back. Here's what to know

What is the 2022 Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade Route?

The timing of when the parade arrives at each area will be pending traffic and logistics as it moves through the community. It will be traveling at about 15 mph to give residents a chance to see it.

Depart Kentucky Exposition Center en route to Zoeller Pump Company

Ribbon Cutting/Official Start at Zoeller Pump Company Leg #1

Leg #2

Leg #3

Leg #4

Zoeller Pump Company Touring Parade will wrap up around 6 p.m.

Reach Kirby Adams at kadams@courier-journal.com or Twitter @kirbylouisville.

Preserving a piece of Pleasanton's heritage

News Century House renovations spark discussion about balancing history with neighborhood needsUploaded: Thu, Jul 15, 2021, 2:53 pm 0 Time to read: about 6 minutesSlideshowThe hazy future of a historic house in Pleasanton is now a bit clearer, with neighbors and city officials committing recently to preserving both a part of their community's heritage and increasingly limited green space.Hidden behind towering trees at the end of a long dirt path flanked by rose bushes, the Century House on Santa...

News

Century House renovations spark discussion about balancing history with neighborhood needs

Uploaded: Thu, Jul 15, 2021, 2:53 pm 0

Time to read: about 6 minutes

Slideshow

The hazy future of a historic house in Pleasanton is now a bit clearer, with neighbors and city officials committing recently to preserving both a part of their community's heritage and increasingly limited green space.

Hidden behind towering trees at the end of a long dirt path flanked by rose bushes, the Century House on Santa Rita Road has been around longer than its name suggests. At 150 years old, the house has had many lives: originally built as a weekend duck hunting lodge by George Atkinson in the 1870s, the Spring Valley Water Co. held ownership at one point and several families called the place home as well.

Time had taken its toll on the Century House when the city of Pleasanton assumed ownership and renovated the building in the 1970s. Over the years, people were married, held birthday parties and attended classes on site.

When the Century House was first remodeled, it wasn't because any particular historic event took place there. Instead, the old wooden farmhouse exemplified the typical home from a time before the city was even founded.

Nearly 50 years later, the city is once again looking to preserve and make use of the former residence, which served as a venue for public classes and events until it was deemed unsafe in 2012. In an interview, Mayor Karla Brown told the Weekly that the reasons for giving the Century House a new facelift are largely the same ones as before.

"It's a pretty special place," Brown said. "It's so easy to miss it, and the trees are so mature."

"Right now, most events are held at the Senior Center or downtown buildings, and this side of Pleasanton could use some community centers out here," Brown said. "If we're going to restore it, then let's use it."

The Century House is near and dear to the heart of Parks and Recreation Commissioner Joanie Fields as well, who called it "one of the only structures in our community that has such a long history."

"Since I grew up here and have known some of the people that have lived in this house, it is very special to me," Fields said.

The parks commission has spent over a year and a half studying the possible usage of the house, according to Fields, and "with some small changes in the floor plan we will be able to have larger classes for all age groups," in addition to birthday parties, weddings and business meetings.

"This is something that is sorely needed ... This will make it more usable for our community," Fields said.

While the Century House has "a lovely history to it," Brown said it also has problems like interior wood rot and compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act requirements, which are expected to present renovation challenges and "be expensive to do it right."

"ADA compliance requires access to the upstairs, and that's an elevator -- and that's a challenge," Brown said. "Right now there's a men's and women's bathroom, neither are big enough for a wheelchair. We asked to make one bigger, but (staff is) assuming they probably need two more bathrooms just for a group of 100 people."

Another option being tossed around is a building separate structure with a kitchen and outside bathroom.

"Old beautiful houses aren't government buildings, but they have to be if they're owned by the city. You have to be ADA compliant," Brown said. "It's difficult to make it compliant with all the government regulations, and that will be a big challenge."

The lengthy lifetime of the Century House means it needs "a complete upgrade of all electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling, a new foundation plus ADA compliance issues," according to Fields.

The first renovation of the Century House decades earlier was "done on a shoestring", and former Pleasanton mayors John McWilliams and Ken Mercer contributed to the effort, she said.

"Mr. McWilliams replaced all of the spindles, making them to match the original ones on the staircase. Ken Mercer helped lay the bricks in the patio and also helped paint the house," Fields said, adding "these two people are just examples of what was happening during this period when we all worked together."

Since then, however, "the codes have all changed," Fields said. "I call it a nip and tuck. When a building has sat empty for eight years, many issues appear that might not have been so evident at the time."

The matter of paying for everything is also weighing on the city and its budget. Depending on the type and amount of work required, city staff estimated at a June 21 public workshop for the Century House Master Plan that renovations and repairs could cost anywhere from $500,000 to $3.5 million.

"It's all financially dependent on capital improvement budgets and this is an expensive one," Brown said. "The city should put money aside because all old homes need maintenance. Ownership of an old home is expensive but that's a part of our city, and the old homes in Pleasanton are what makes us unique."

Regular maintenance shouldn't be as much of an issue because it "would be like any other city-owned properties," according to Fields.

"All buildings are allocated major and minor repairs as needed, such as interior/exterior painting, new carpeting," Fields said. "Our city staff has done an outstanding job keeping all of our buildings in working condition throughout the years."

When it comes to having enough money upfront to get the renovations done, Brown said, "We're not confident because we've had a couple down years, especially with COVID and funds we've given to our small businesses to keep them afloat, getting the Century House renovated will be a challenge."

One hurdle the city appears to have cleared recently, though, is making peace with surrounding neighbors who were upset by a proposal to pave over approximately 25% of the adjacent Bicentennial Park to add more parking spaces. The parking area for Century House currently has less than a dozen parking spaces but could potentially fit a total of about 20, according to city staff.

"We have quite a few apartments in that area ... which makes an area like Bicentennial Park more valuable," Brown said. Now the city's ultimate goal is to add more parking while preserving "the whole sense, the look, the historic layout of the front yard with the roses."

At first glance Bicentennial Park appears to be an unassuming strip of land bare of any play equipment, but neighbor Jean Hazell, who lives about a block away, said it's an essential facility for her family and neighbors. Walking less than a mile to Ken Mercer Sports Park might not seem like a big deal, but she said "it's not okay if you've got mobility issues or really little kids."

"The green space was part of what made the parcel special and we hoped to make it common ground," Hazell said.

Hazell and her neighbors successfully circulated a petition recently, which was signed by more than 900 residents demanding the city find parking alternatives for Century House besides taking away their green space.

At the city workshop, officials indicated interest in exploring the option of opening the gate between the park and Century House during larger events, which would allow some limited access along Tanager Drive for cars.

Ultimately, the council directed staff to abandon additional parking options at Bicentennial Park and instead add a drop-off area on Santa Rita, as well as explore adding more parking spaces along the outer perimeter of the existing driveway, which would leave the front lawn and rose bushes intact.

The owner of the Tri-Valley Medical Center building at the corner of Santa Rita Road and Mohr Avenue was also receptive to a shared-use parking arrangement on their property. Hazell called it "a great offsite option to complete what they're doing onsite" that's also conveniently located near the crosswalk.

"This process has yielded an outcome where we can both honor the history and restore a special place that a lot in the community hold dear, and also honor the commitment that was made a long time ago to the green space of this park," Hazell said, also adding "a lot of neighbors were heartened and reassured that the process worked when city officials listened."

Even before the draft master plan is expected to be completed this fall, Hazell said the process has already "knit the neighborhood together." Now more neighbors now recognize each other while out for a stroll in the treasured bit of local green space where it all started.

"I came away from the process feeling really glad about it," Hazell said.

The Century House is not only a portal to the past but also a place where residents have imagined their future, whether attending a wedding or art class on site. Brown said "the romantic side of me" would "like to see it used for weddings, birthdays and life events, as well as classes that the neighborhood could use," while Hazell envisions chamber music concerts.

With its out-of-the-way location and ability to hide in plain sight, the Century House has been overlooked at times, but Brown said the building is a reminder for locals that "not everything that's old and valuable in Pleasanton is on Main Street."

Editor's note: A previous version of this story included a photo caption that incorrectly stated Pleasanton Parks and Recreation Commissioner Joanie Fields lived in the Century House during her youth. Fields grew up in Pleasanton and knew people who lived in the house, but never resided there herself. The Weekly regrets the error.

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Santa Barbara County supervisors deny appeal of 2.54-acre cannabis grow on Santa Rita Road

A permit for a small cannabis cultivation operation on Santa Rita Road about halfway between Buellton and Lompoc was approved last week by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors, which rejected an appeal focused primarily on an easement for accessing the site.Supervisors on Sept. 21 unanimously rejected the appeal filed by JCCrandall LLC of the Planning Commiss...

A permit for a small cannabis cultivation operation on Santa Rita Road about halfway between Buellton and Lompoc was approved last week by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors, which rejected an appeal focused primarily on an easement for accessing the site.

Supervisors on Sept. 21 unanimously rejected the appeal filed by JCCrandall LLC of the Planning Commission’s approval of a conditional use permit for Santa Rita Holdings to grow 2.54 acres of cannabis on a site where cultivation is already taking place as a legal nonconforming use.

The permit will allow Santa Rita Holdings to cultivate 1.88 acres of mature plants under hoops and 0.55 acres in the open, with 0.11 acres used as a nursery, according to a County Planning and Development staff report.

County planner Gwendolyn Beyeler said the operation will have three employees who will live on-site with an additional 12 employees added during the three-day harvests three times a year.

The operators estimate annual water use will be 1 acre-foot, which is about 326,000 gallons or enough to serve roughly two households.

Beyeler said no odor-causing drying, curing or trimming will take place on site, as harvested cannabis will be frozen and trucked away.

That trucking out the cannabis via an easement over private property was the crux of JCCrandall’s opposition.

“Although we appealed the permit on multiple grounds, our main argument applies to this easement and the county’s decision to allow a commercial cannabis activity over my client’s property without my client’s consent,” said Ernest Guadiana, representing JCCrandall.

Guadiana said because cannabis is still illegal under federal law, his client could be prosecuted as an accessory and have her property seized, and he noted state law requires the written consent of a property owner before a cannabis operation is approved.

He said even if his client consented to the easement use, the road is inadequate to handle large cannabis-hauling trucks, and if the permit was granted, the county should require Santa Rita Holdings to widen and improve the roadway.

But Jason Hillenbrand of Santa Rita Holdings said several surveys of the site have been conducted to assure cultivation is not taking place within the setback and the trucks Guardiana referred to were not cannabis trucks.

He also produced a Vista Hills letter saying the company has adequate water.

Hillenbrand also pointed out there are a lot of large cannabis cultivation operations in the surrounding area.

“We’re 2½ acres, tucked away, kind of up in the middle of nowhere,” he said, adding he thinks that’s the type of small operation the public wants.

Supervisors didn’t buy the appellant’s arguments.

“The appellant came today with a laundry list of things … for them to oppose [the permit] on,” said 4th District Supervisor and Board Chairman Bob Nelson. “I didn’t think many of them held much water. … I can’t find anything I would do different on this project.”

Third District Supervisor Joan Hartmann, 2nd District Supervisor Gregg Hart and 2nd District Supervisor Das Williams all agreed, noting the project is small, is in a good location to minimize nuisance and has had no complaints.

But 5th District Supervisor Steve Lavagnino said he believed the appeal was unnecessary.

He acknowledged people’s right to be heard but said the problem is that anyone can pay $701 and file an appeal.

"And this cost us, I think it was 75 hours of staff time and $19,000 to hold this hearing,” he said. “This project, to me, is a no-brainer. It should have just sailed through.”

Christmas tradition carried on in San Angelo neighborhood since 1948

SAN ANGELO — The Santa Rita neighborhood in San Angelo has a tradition of bonding through Christmas spirit.Neighborhood residents put up Christmas lights along Paseo De Vaca St. and in Santa Rita Park every year.Since 1948, shadow boxes have dis...

SAN ANGELO — The Santa Rita neighborhood in San Angelo has a tradition of bonding through Christmas spirit.

Neighborhood residents put up Christmas lights along Paseo De Vaca St. and in Santa Rita Park every year.

Since 1948, shadow boxes have displayed the story of "‘Twas the Night Before Christmas."

Resident Marilynn Golightly said Ogden McGowan and the Santa Rita Sportsman's Club decorated and celebrated the family tradition of displaying the lights.

"You expect the women to do it, but can you get the daddies in town to do it?" Golightly said. "They were up there bright and early with their ladders ready to go with all the kids helping out. It looks better to me this year than any other year."

The boxes are open from 6-10 p.m. daily through Dec. 27 and are display on Algerita Drive. They are restored yearly and are brought out the first Monday in December.

DeCoty Coffee and Chick-fil-A provides hot chocolate and cookies for viewers on the weekends.

Golightly said every year they get volunteers from the neighborhood each night to open and close the boxes and hand out the treats curbside.

If you are interested in volunteering, call Golightly at 325-655-8423 or 325-500-8431.

There is also security on duty every day for the safety of viewers and the boxes.

People are encouraged, but not required, to contribute to the donation box, which helps fund the yearly project.

Golightly, 72, said she has experienced the shadow boxes since she was a kid and looked forward to going back each December.

"People come from outside of town just to see the boxes and lights; it's amazing," she said. "We try to build spirit in the neighborhood, and everyone really enjoys it."

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