Appliance Repair in San Joaquin, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in San Joaquin, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in San Joaquin, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
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  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
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  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
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  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in San Joaquin, CA

How California can expand solar development and support San Joaquin Valley farmers

In summaryCalifornia can both achieve its long-term clean energy goals and invest in struggling San Joaquin Valley communities by expanding solar development on fallowed farmland.Guest Commentary written byDarcy Wheeles is a Principal at ArkSpring Consulting and has extensive experience in strategic planning and facilitation for land use, environmental justice, environmental policy and climate issues.California’s largest farming region faces a daunting challenge.As the state adapts it...

In summary

California can both achieve its long-term clean energy goals and invest in struggling San Joaquin Valley communities by expanding solar development on fallowed farmland.

Guest Commentary written by

Darcy Wheeles is a Principal at ArkSpring Consulting and has extensive experience in strategic planning and facilitation for land use, environmental justice, environmental policy and climate issues.

California’s largest farming region faces a daunting challenge.

As the state adapts its groundwater basins under the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, the San Joaquin Valley will have to shrink its footprint. The Public Policy Institute of California estimates that at least 500,000 acres of farmland will likely need to come out of production over the next two decades.

Fallowing land can lead to a host of problems, including employment losses for the valley’s agricultural workers and revenue losses for landowners and local governments. It could also exacerbate issues with airborne dust in a region already suffering from some of the worst air quality in the nation. And pests and weeds could cause a nuisance for lands still in production.

But that soon-to-be-fallowed land has some of the best solar potential in the state. And it will be idled just as California seeks to dramatically boost its renewable energy generation.

This creates a brand new opportunity for farmers, and a chance to align state and regional goals. The state government has committed to overhauling the electrical grid under Senate Bill 100, which aims for 100% renewable and carbon-free power by 2045.

Done right, solar development could provide new employment opportunities in the San Joaquin Valley while keeping fallowed land productive and curbing environmental risks like dust generation.

To ensure that this development benefits the region’s workers, growers and broader community, careful planning is essential. A recent PPIC report explored how to make these energy and land transitions successful.

Transforming the San Joaquin Valley into a solar hub will not be easy. Developers and local communities face serious obstacles, including a lack of available transmission capacity. Getting new solar projects connected to the grid can be difficult and expensive.

Meeting state energy goals will also require a significant expansion in grid capacity, and cohesive planning will ensure those investments target places where they can provide the greatest benefits.

For solar developments to benefit local communities, projects should be thoughtfully sited to manage local concerns – such as dust emissions and visual impacts – and generate opportunities for local workers. Siting and design should also minimize impacts on valuable conservation areas that provide important ecological benefits for the region and state as a whole.

Valley residents will need expanded training programs that are accessible for workforce benefits to materialize broadly. Improved transportation options will be essential to increasing participation.

Facilitating a swift build-out of solar will require close coordination to meet the state’s energy goals and maximize the benefits for the region. Areas that have limited community or ecological impacts should be expedited for development by streamlining approvals and working in tandem with state energy planners.

State officials will also need to incorporate new land use information into their existing processes for energy projects. For example, they could work with local groundwater agencies to understand where land is likely to come out of production and target investments that can help these areas transition directly into solar development.

Achieving this level of synergy means that county governments, the California Energy Commission and others will need to strengthen their ties. The commission’s latest efforts to develop methods for energy planners to incorporate land use considerations more deliberately are a step in the right direction.

There is a unique opportunity to align the implementation of two state policies, groundwater laws and California’s clean energy goals to benefit consumers and support the economy in one of the state’s most economically challenged regions. The task of stewarding hundreds of thousands of acres of fallowed land is as daunting as the energy goals are ambitious, but proactive, coordinated action can make both undertakings successful.

How California can expand solar development and support San Joaquin Valley farmers | Guest Commentary

As farmers reduce their groundwater use under California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, the footprint of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley will have to shrink. The Public Policy Institute of California estimates that at least 500,000 acres of farmland will likely need to come out of production over the next two decades.Fallowing land can lead to a host of problems, including employment losses for the valley’s agricultural workers and revenue losses for landowners and local governments. It could als...

As farmers reduce their groundwater use under California’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, the footprint of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley will have to shrink. The Public Policy Institute of California estimates that at least 500,000 acres of farmland will likely need to come out of production over the next two decades.

Fallowing land can lead to a host of problems, including employment losses for the valley’s agricultural workers and revenue losses for landowners and local governments. It could also exacerbate issues with airborne dust in a region already suffering from some of the worst air quality in the nation. And pests and weeds could cause a nuisance for lands still in production.

But that soon-to-be-fallowed land has some of the best solar potential in the state. And it will be idled just as California seeks to dramatically boost its renewable energy generation.

This creates a brand new opportunity for farmers, and a chance to align state and regional goals. The state government has committed to overhauling the electrical grid under Senate Bill 100, which aims for 100% renewable and carbon-free power by 2045.

Done right, solar development could provide new employment opportunities in the San Joaquin Valley while keeping fallowed land productive and curbing environmental risks like dust generation.

To ensure that this development benefits the region’s workers, growers and broader community, careful planning is essential. A recent PPIC report explored how to make these energy and land transitions successful.

Transforming the San Joaquin Valley into a solar hub will not be easy. Developers and local communities face serious obstacles, including a lack of available transmission capacity. Getting new solar projects connected to the grid can be difficult and expensive.

Meeting state energy goals will also require a significant expansion in grid capacity, and cohesive planning will ensure those investments target places where they can provide the greatest benefits.

For solar developments to benefit local communities, projects should be thoughtfully sited to manage local concerns – such as dust emissions and visual impacts – and generate opportunities for local workers. Siting and design should also minimize impacts on valuable conservation areas that provide important ecological benefits for the region and state as a whole.

Valley residents will need expanded training programs that are accessible for workforce benefits to materialize broadly. Improved transportation options will be essential to increasing participation.

Facilitating a swift build-out of solar will require close coordination to meet the state’s energy goals and maximize the benefits for the region. Areas that have limited community or ecological impacts should be expedited for development by streamlining approvals and working in tandem with state energy planners.

State officials will also need to incorporate new land use information into their existing processes for energy projects. For example, they could work with local groundwater agencies to understand where land is likely to come out of production and target investments that can help these areas transition directly into solar development.

Achieving this level of synergy means that county governments, the California Energy Commission and others will need to strengthen their ties. The commission’s latest efforts to develop methods for energy planners to incorporate land use considerations more deliberately are a step in the right direction.

There is a unique opportunity to align the implementation of two state policies, groundwater laws and California’s clean energy goals to benefit consumers and support the economy in one of the state’s most economically challenged regions. The task of stewarding hundreds of thousands of acres of fallowed land is as daunting as the energy goals are ambitious, but proactive, coordinated action can make both undertakings successful.

Andrew Ayres is a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California Water Policy Center. Darcy Wheeles is a Principal at ArkSpring Consulting and has extensive experience in strategic planning and facilitation for land use, environmental justice, environmental policy and climate issues.

Where to find San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties' mail ballot drop off locations

Through Nov. 8, multiple cities in both San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties will have mail in voter drop-off locations, and some voting centers are now open.STOCKTON, Calif. — Both San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties have mail-in ballot options for registered voters, but there also remain many options for in-person voters.Voter information released by the county shows the location of current ballot drop-offs, and some voting centers open before Nov. 8.San Joaquin County Ballot Drop OffIn San Joaquin County...

Through Nov. 8, multiple cities in both San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties will have mail in voter drop-off locations, and some voting centers are now open.

STOCKTON, Calif. — Both San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties have mail-in ballot options for registered voters, but there also remain many options for in-person voters.

Voter information released by the county shows the location of current ballot drop-offs, and some voting centers open before Nov. 8.

San Joaquin County Ballot Drop Off

In San Joaquin County, the cities with ballot drop-off locations open through Nov. 8 include:

The following cities have ballot drop-off locations at their respective city halls:

Escalon City Hall2060 McHenry Ave., Escalon, CA 95320Mon - Thurs (8 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

Lathrop City Hall390 Towne Centre Dr., Lathrop, CA 95330Mon - Thurs (8 a.m. - 6 p.m.), Fri (8 a.m. - 5 p.m.)

Lodi City Hall221 W Pine St., Lodi, CA 95240Mon - Thurs (7:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m.), Fri (8 a.m. -5 p.m.) Closed Nov. 4

Manteca City Hall1001 W Center St., Manteca, CA 95337Mon - Thurs (7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.)

Ripon City Hall259 N Wilma Ave., Ripon, CA 95366Mon - Thurs (7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.)

Tracy City Hall333 Civic Center Dr., Tracy, CA 95376Mon - Thurs (8 a.m. - 6 p.m.), Fri (8 a.m. - 5 p.m.) Closed Nov. 4

Stanislaus County Ballot Drop Off

In Stanislaus County, the cities with ballot drop-off locations open through Nov. 8 include:

The following cities have ballot drop-off locations at their respective city halls:

Ceres City Hall2220 Magnolia St., Ceres, CA 95307Mon - Fri (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

Hughson City Hall7018 Pine St., Hughson, CA 95326Mon - Fri (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

Turlock City Hall156 S. Broadway, Ste 230 (2nd floor) Turlock, CA 95380Mon - Fri (8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.)

Waterford City Hall101 “E” St., Waterford, CA 95386Mon - Fri (8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.)

The following voting center locations will open Oct. 29 through Nov. 8, 7 a.m. - 8 p.m., (8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on weekends and holidays):

Stanislaus Veterans Center3500 Coffee Rd., Suite #15, Room 114/115, Modesto, CA 95355

Stanislaus Culinary Arts Institute1040 Wakefield Dr., Oakdale, CA 95361

Salida Library4835 Sisk Rd., Community Room, Salida, CA 95368

L.J. Newman Memorial Building649 Orestimba Rd., Newman, CA 95360

Hampton Inn by HiltonTurlock 1821 Lander Ave., Meeting Room, Turlock, CA 95380

Waterford Community Center540 “C” St., Waterford, CA 95386

Click here for a list of Stanislaus County voting center locations opening Nov. 5 through Nov. 8, 7 a.m. - 8 p.m., (8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on weekends and holidays).

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Comcast Donates 200+ Laptops to San Joaquin Valley Students and Launches Five New 'Lift Zones' to Help Close the Digital Divide

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Comcast Opens New Lift Zone Offering Free WiFi, Provides More Than 200 Free Laptops to Families and Donates $200,000 to Fund Workforce Development Opportunities

Stockton, CA

--News Direct--

In an effort to help close the Digital Divide in California, Comcast today donated 200+ laptops to students at El Concilio Academy in Stockton, CA, while also opening five new Lift Zones at several El Concilio California locations to provide free access to high-speed WiFi. As part of its larger digital equity initiative, Comcast also made a cash contribution of $50,000 to El Concilio, California, which is one of the largest community-based, nonprofit social service providers in California's San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties.

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Comcast's award-winning Lift Zones program offers free WiFi, powered by a Comcast Business solution, which enables students, seniors, families, and community members to get online and more fully participate in the digital economy. With these new locations, Comcast has now established five Lift Zones in San Joaquin County—and a total of over 150 Lift Zones throughout its California service area.

"It's no secret that having access to high-speed, reliable broadband is even greater today than it was a couple years ago, and I'm grateful to see business partners like Comcast continuing to invest in our underserved communities," said Jose R. Rodriguez, President & CEO of El Concilio California. "The resources provided by Comcast to our students and families today will have a significant impact on their overall quality of life, help maximize their potential and create lasting change."

"Thank you, Comcast for positively impacting our community through technology services, financial resources, and the launch of new Lift Zones in Stockton." said Mayor Kevin Lincoln, of Stockton, CA. "Internet access is not a luxury, it is a necessity. I am grateful for Comcast's continued support in providing these critical tools for our city."

"Closing the digital divide and addressing digital equity remain two of Comcast's top priorities here in Stockton and across the nation," said Broderick Johnson, EVP, Digital Equity and EVP, Public Policy, Comcast Corporation. "Programs like Lift Zones and our continued donations to provide digital literacy resources are helping to level the playing field and make sure the Internet is available to everyone who needs it."

Today's announcement and donation is part of Project UP, Comcast's $1 billion commitment to reach millions of people with the tools, resources, and skills needed to succeed in a digital world. The Comcast Lift Zones program complements the Internet Essentials program, which since 2011, has helped connect more than 10 million low-income people to the Internet at home. In California, Comcast has connected more than 1.7 million residents, making it the number one state in terms of overall participation in the Internet Essentials program.

Comcast continues to be an avid participant in the Federal Government's Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP), which provides eligible people up to a $30/per month credit toward their Internet and mobile services. New and existing Xfinity Internet or Internet Essentials customers can learn more about the program and sign up by visiting: https://www.xfinity.com/learn/internet-service/acp/free-internet.

About El Concilio California Academies:

El Concilio California Academies (ECCA) partners with community groups to build and operate free K-12 public charter schools serving students in the California. ECCA's system of schools is designed to eliminate the achievement gap and provide school choice to families so their children are prepared for success in high school, college, and beyond. For more information or to enroll your student in the new Academy, visit ECCAcademies.org.

About El Concilio California:

In continual operation for 54 years, El Concilio California is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit multi-service agency with the trusted mission to uplift and advocate for California's marginalized, minority, economically segregated, and communities of color by providing access to crucial services, programs, and resources to over 75,000 individuals and families annually for a whole-person approach to increased physical, psychological, and economic well-being, to help people create better futures for themselves and their families reach their full potential, become leaders to the community, and in turn empower others.

About Comcast Corporation

Comcast Corporation (NASDAQ:CMCSA) is a global media and technology company that connects people to moments that matter. We are principally focused on connectivity, aggregation, and streaming with 57 million customer relationships across the United States and Europe. We deliver broadband, wireless, and video through our Xfinity, Comcast Business, and Sky brands; create, distribute, and stream leading entertainment, sports, and news through Universal Filmed Entertainment Group, Universal Studio Group, Sky Studios, the NBC and Telemundo broadcast networks, multiple cable networks, Peacock, NBCUniversal News Group, NBC Sports, Sky News, and Sky Sports; and provide memorable experiences at Universal Parks and Resorts in the United States and Asia. Visit www.comcastcorporation.com for more information.

Jon Koriel

+1 925-315-2690

jon_koriel@comcast.com

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Editorial: The feds can curb a foolish California water giveaway

About 15 miles north of Fresno sits Millerton Lake, a reservoir created in the 1930s when the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation built Friant Dam on the San Joaquin River. The dam provides irrigation water for fields and groves in much of the San Joaquin Valley, but it wiped out the Chinook salmon migration that had existed on the river for tens of thousands of years.It also threatened the rights of landowners to divert naturally flowing San Joaquin R...

About 15 miles north of Fresno sits Millerton Lake, a reservoir created in the 1930s when the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation built Friant Dam on the San Joaquin River. The dam provides irrigation water for fields and groves in much of the San Joaquin Valley, but it wiped out the Chinook salmon migration that had existed on the river for tens of thousands of years.

It also threatened the rights of landowners to divert naturally flowing San Joaquin River water for their fields. Instead of losing their rights, though, farmers who had land near the river agreed to trade their water to the federal dam project in exchange for “substitute water,” delivered to them from the Sacramento River.

This is one of several big water agreements, known as settlement or exchange contracts, that swapped water rights in order to permit construction of large projects in the 20th century, including the federal government’s massive Central Valley Project of dams, canals and aqueducts. In addition to the San Joaquin agreement, there are similar contracts for projects on the Sacramento and Feather rivers.

When the contracts were signed, California was a lush state with a seemingly endless water supply. Today, though, the state is increasingly arid, and the state and federal agencies that manage water projects have sharply reduced or cut off supplies for most growers and cities.

Yet under the San Joaquin exchange contract, four irrigation districts are together getting, on average, more water than the city of Los Angeles uses in a year. In fact, they’re getting more water than they would have gotten if the dam had never been built and they were still relying on the natural flow of the San Joaquin River. This year the Sacramento River can’t currently supply all the “exchange” water they’re promised, so now they’re also getting more water from Millerton Lake. So in a sense, they’re getting back some of the water they agreed to give up, in addition to the water they agreed to give it up for.

That’s quite a contract.

Meanwhile, a section of the San Joaquin River has run dry, despite a 2006 legal settlement that required enough Millerton Lake water to be released to permit the salmon to again migrate, at least for part of the journey. The problem is that there’s no room in the river channel to both send water farther downstream and send it to the exchange contractors.

There is one bit of good news. The San Joaquin exchange contract includes an optional renegotiating period that opens once every five years, allowing the terms to be reset to keep up with changing conditions in the state. Climate change and persistent drought certainly seem to qualify as changing conditions.

The period is currently open, but it closes Tuesday, so the Biden administration had to trigger renegotiations, or be stuck for another five years with a contract that locks in unreasonable uses of California’s diminishing water supply. Late last week, it finally acted.

The renegotiation window is one example of how inequities, and legal frameworks created under wetter conditions, can and should be rectified under the state’s existing system of water rights.

That’s important, because in a drier California, water is becoming increasingly precious. Why, Californians might ask, when most of us have to conserve, should someone be able to use up big chunks of the state’s supply to grow even more almonds and pistachios simply because their great-grandparents grabbed river-adjacent land from Indigenous people? The answer is generally that water rights are property rights and are protected under the 5th Amendment, which requires government to pay compensation for taking private property for public use.

But it’s not quite that simple. Despite private property rights, California law requires the state to hold water (and air, and the seashore) in trust for the benefit of the people, so water rights are not unlimited, and not every infringement is an unconstitutional taking without compensation. That’s why the city of L.A. had to stop draining Mono Lake to quench its thirst. The city owned the water rights, but it couldn’t use the water if it meant destroying the lake.

There are other opportunities for adjusting water use to keep up with changing climate and environmental and human needs. But the San Joaquin exchange contract’s renegotiation provision is low-hanging fruit. It‘s good to know that the federal government took this rare chance to pluck it.

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