Appliance Repair in Reedley, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We work with your busy schedule to get you the service you need.

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Your factory-trained technician will travel to your location and diagnose your appliance problem.

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We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Reedley, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Reedley, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
  • Urgent Service
  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Reedley, CA

Prima® Wawona Announces First-Ever Prima® Run During Reedley Health & Fitness Expo; Mary Ellen Lomeli and Erik Valencia Comment

Sponsored Message Learn MoreREEDLEY, CA - We in the produce industry are fierce champions of health and wellness. Not only can a fresh-focused diet support our health, but physical fitness can also play a role. Prima® Wawona is advocating for health on both fronts, recently announcing its first annual Prima® Run at its Reedley Cold Storage and Shipping Facility. Partnering with The Greater ...

Sponsored Message

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REEDLEY, CA - We in the produce industry are fierce champions of health and wellness. Not only can a fresh-focused diet support our health, but physical fitness can also play a role. Prima® Wawona is advocating for health on both fronts, recently announcing its first annual Prima® Run at its Reedley Cold Storage and Shipping Facility. Partnering with The Greater Reedley Chamber of Commerce and Xcelerate Fitness, the competitive 5K run and two-mile family walk will be part of the Regional Health & Fitness Expo taking place April 1–3.

“Our goal in hosting the Prima Run is to foster a healthy work environment and community,” says Mary Ellen Lomeli, Prima Wawona Benefit Specialist, explaining some of the many ways this event will support the Reedley, California, community.

The competitive 5K run will start at 6:50 a.m. on April 2, and the top three male and female runners will receive commemorative medals. The 2-mile family walk will start at 8:30 a.m. and is for all fitness levels and ages. According to a press release, it is free for students in K-12 using the code Prima22.

A featured “Fitness Expo” with athletic competitions, exercise classes, workshops, and food vendors will be a part of the Health & Fitness Expo. Additionally, the Central Valley Throwdown will be present along with a CrossFit competition sponsored by Gnardog Crossfit. There will also be presentations by Fitness Quest Health Club, City of Reedley Parks & Recreation, Reedley College, and Sierra View Homes.

“The goal of this event is to engage and encourage the families in our region to live healthy active lives by introducing them to programs and activities that they may not have known about,” said Greater Reedley Chamber of Commerce President and Chief Executive Officer Erik Valencia.

Event organizers expect to attract people from throughout the region and anticipate about 1,500 attendees. Registration for the Prima Run must be submitted by the end of today, March 10. Please click here to register.

We wish the best of luck to all the health and fitness champions hitting the pavement!

Measure E, sales tax to support Fresno State upgrades, loses ground in updates

The Fresno County tax measure that would generate an estimated $36 million for academic and infrastructure upgrades at Fresno State lost ground in a third update on election night.To pass, the measure must receive 50% plus one vote from county voters. But with more than 122,000 or 25.3% of the votes tabulated, no votes totaled 53.8% and yes votes were at 46.2%. The margin was 9,304 votes.“Yes” was trailing by 3,175 in the initial results from the county, then 6,037 votes in a second update.The measure, backed...

The Fresno County tax measure that would generate an estimated $36 million for academic and infrastructure upgrades at Fresno State lost ground in a third update on election night.

To pass, the measure must receive 50% plus one vote from county voters. But with more than 122,000 or 25.3% of the votes tabulated, no votes totaled 53.8% and yes votes were at 46.2%. The margin was 9,304 votes.

“Yes” was trailing by 3,175 in the initial results from the county, then 6,037 votes in a second update.

The measure, backed by construction company owner Richard Spencer and the Fresno State Improvement Zone Committee, would increase sales and use tax in the county by 0.2% and 0.25% in Reedley for a period of 20 years or one penny on a $5 purchase. It would apply to gross receipts of all retail sales and all tangible personal property sold at retail in the county, and to the sales price of tangible personal property purchased from any retailers for the storage, use or other consumption in the county of that property.

A five-member citizens’ oversight committee appointed by the Fresno County Board of Supervisors would control the use of the tax funds to ensure they are used consistent with the measure, oversee the issuance of bonds and provide an annual audit report.

Two-thirds of the tax funds would go to academic facilities and programs including nursing, agriculture, criminology and engineering/STEM programs, provide scholarships for local and low-income students and repair and upgrade campus infrastructure in dire need of renovation.

No more than one-third of the funds would go to athletics facilities, including an aged Valley Children’s Stadium.

If approved, the county would be authorized to issue and sell bonds of up to $500 million in aggregated principal at interest rates below the legal limit over a 20-year term. Proceeds from the sale would be used for design, construction, renovation or modernization of facilities on campus and within a 2-mile radius of its boundaries.

Bond proceeds may also be used to acquire property for future facilities.

Spencer, a frequent contributor school bond measures, has donated around $1.5 million to the campaign.

His firm, Harris Construction, built the Jordan Agricultural Research Center at the university. The California State University system, and not Fresno State, would vet and choose bids for any projects on campus.

Fresno State, like many CSU campuses, has a long list of deferred maintenance projects and university president Saúl Jimenéz-Sandoval said the 23-campus system has $1 billion deferred maintenance. The latest state budget included just $125 million in one-time funds.

Measure E came together quickly over the summer. Proponents of any measure or initiative have 180 days to collect signatures, but starting in June the Fresno State Improvement Zone Committee needed just six weeks to gather more than 25,000 verified signatures 10% of the number of votes cast in the last gubernatorial election.

Fresno County Clerk James Kus in August said random sample testing showed that at least 28,095 petition signatures proved valid, putting the measure over 110% of signatures needed for certification. The board of supervisors voted unanimously at its regularly-scheduled Aug. 9 meeting to include the measure on the ballot.

This story was originally published November 8, 2022 8:28 PM.

Reedley family reunited with pets lost after fire destroys their home

REEDLEY, Calif. (KFSN) -- Six people were displaced after a fire spread to two homes in Reedley early Wednesday morning.One of those people is Lianna Pena, who lived in her home for 38 years before it was completely destroyed."It's devastating. I can't even explain it," she said. "To lose everything like that."Lianna was sitting on the front porch around midnight when flames broke out in her backyard on 9th Street near D Street."I didn't realize until it was too late," she said....

REEDLEY, Calif. (KFSN) -- Six people were displaced after a fire spread to two homes in Reedley early Wednesday morning.

One of those people is Lianna Pena, who lived in her home for 38 years before it was completely destroyed.

"It's devastating. I can't even explain it," she said. "To lose everything like that."

Lianna was sitting on the front porch around midnight when flames broke out in her backyard on 9th Street near D Street.

"I didn't realize until it was too late," she said.

Investigators are trying to figure out what led to the fire.

Firefighters faced challenges when fighting the flames, as several power lines were knocked down. The battalion chief said it was "like a firework show going off." PG&E was able to come in an help de-energize the lines.

Lianna's two adult sons made sure their mom made it to safety. But before she could react, decades of memories were destroyed - including her house, everything inside, her car, and even her cell phone. The home next door was also a total loss.

In the commotion of getting to safety when the house was burning, Lianna lost her animals. Her cat didn't make it out alive and her two dogs took off.

"That's my daughter's dog," she said. "And my daughter passed from COVID last year. And this was like her baby."

A good Samaritan found her daughter's dog, Callie. Hours later, Action News was there for an emotional reunion when Reedley Animal Control brought "little bear" back home.

What the flames didn't touch was a picture of Lianna's daughter Jennifer. This house is the last place where she lived.

"Everything burned around it but her picture didn't," she said. "I just feel her presence and that makes me stronger."

Lianna says she knows her daughter was watching over her and her sons Tuesday night. The support from her neighbors is reassurance that she will rebuild in Reedley.

"My neighbors are great. I love my neighbors. My neighbors were there for us," she said. "This is where I have lived my whole life. This is where...yeah, I want to be here."

A GoFundMe has been set up for the family.

Former CVC star golfer Stark transferring

Brian Stark is headed from one college golf powerhouse to another, as he has decided to leave Oklahoma State for the University of Texas.Scott Stark, the father of the Central Valley Christian alum, confirmed to Sports Central in a text that Brian will be transferring to the University of Texas for the spring semester, where he will be eligible right away.Brian was a third-team All-American with the Cowboys last year as a third-year junior, but did not play in a tournament for the Cowboys this fall, so he will be eligible to co...

Brian Stark is headed from one college golf powerhouse to another, as he has decided to leave Oklahoma State for the University of Texas.

Scott Stark, the father of the Central Valley Christian alum, confirmed to Sports Central in a text that Brian will be transferring to the University of Texas for the spring semester, where he will be eligible right away.

Brian was a third-team All-American with the Cowboys last year as a third-year junior, but did not play in a tournament for the Cowboys this fall, so he will be eligible to compete right away for the Longhorns.

“Brian just wanted a change of scenery,” wrote Scott Stark, the golf coach at Reedley College, in a text to Sports Central. “Texas is a great program for him!! Really excited for his future with the defending national champion Texas Longhorns!!!! Hook ‘Em!!!

Brian was one of the top junior golfers in the country coming out of high school, after winning four AJGA junior titles.

He advanced to the quarterfinals of the U.S. Amateur in 2021, had three top-six finishes during the fall season of 2021 for Oklahoma State, and tied for 15th place at the NCAA Championships in 2022.

The younger Stark will have two years of eligibility remaining for Texas, if he chooses to utilize both of them.

As a fourth-year college senior, he is eligible for the the PGA TOUR University Velocity Global Rankings, and is currently ranked 13th in the standings.

If Stark could finish in the top five of the rankings following the next NCAA men’s golf Championships in late May , he would earn immediate full membership on the Korn Ferry Tour, the feeder tour right below the PGA Tour.

“If he finishes in the Top 5, he’ll turn professional,” wrote Scott about his son, who is graduating from Oklahoma State in December with a degree in Sports Management (3.5 years).

Reedley women’s golf takes 2nd at NorCal Regional

The Reedley women’s golf team, under the direction of Scott Stark, took second place at the Northern California Regional Championships Monday at Dragonfly Golf Club in Madera.

Freshman Madeline Reed (Clovis North HS) took individual medalist honors, shooting 74-76 (+4), and another freshman Keahana Castillo (Merced HS) was third overall with scores of 79-79 (+12). The Tigers advanced to the State Championships for the fourth year in a row.

The state tournament will take place at Morro Bay Golf Club on Sunday and Monday of next week.

Rich Rifkin: Katherine Esau — the woman in the picture

I recently came upon a 1942 faculty photo. It included Katherine Esau. I wasn’t looking for her. She is depicted in front of the Botany building alongside her UC Davis plant sciences colleagues, Alden Crafts, Herbert Currier, Elliot Weier, Ralph Stocking and Wilfred Robbins.It was Robbins whom I was looking for. The eponym of Robbins Hall was an esteemed botanist, who dabbled in Davis real estate. He built the house at 501 Oak Avenue for his family.In order to get approval from Yolo County to subdivide his land, which ext...

I recently came upon a 1942 faculty photo. It included Katherine Esau. I wasn’t looking for her. She is depicted in front of the Botany building alongside her UC Davis plant sciences colleagues, Alden Crafts, Herbert Currier, Elliot Weier, Ralph Stocking and Wilfred Robbins.

It was Robbins whom I was looking for. The eponym of Robbins Hall was an esteemed botanist, who dabbled in Davis real estate. He built the house at 501 Oak Avenue for his family.

In order to get approval from Yolo County to subdivide his land, which extended north to what later became W. Eighth Street, W.W. Robbins agreed to preserve the now 160-year-old Valley Oak tree on his home site.

Professor Esau never lived on the street her colleague named Oak Avenue. She came to town in 1927, residing in an on-campus dormitory, as a graduate student at the Agricultural College of the University of California, then a branch of UC Berkeley.

Esau was awarded her PhD in December, 1931 for her dissertation on “the anatomy of the sugar beet and the infestation of the curly-top.” She later wrote that she “discovered what part of the plant the virus first became active in, and what exactly it was doing to the tissue.”

Before moving to Davis, Esau had worked for Spreckels Sugar Company in Salinas for three years. However, she did not start out in California.

Esau was born in 1898 to a German Mennonite family in Ekaterinoslav, Russia. (Today that city is called Dnipro, Ukraine.) Her great-grandfather, Aron Esau, migrated to Russia from Prussia in 1804; her maternal ancestors arrived in 1788. Starting in the late-1700s, the tsarist government encouraged Germans to move to imperial Russia, bringing with them more advanced knowledge of agriculture than the native peasants had.

As an ethnic minority group who were not members of the dominant Russian Orthodox church, Germans in Russia and Ukraine were targets of discrimination. Many began leaving for the United States in the late 1800s, often settling in the Dakotas and Nebraska.

The Esau family remained in Russia a few decades longer.

“In the fall of 1916, I entered the Golitsin Women’s Agricultural College in Moscow, starting with natural sciences, physics, chemistry and geology,” she wrote in her autobiography.

Her studies were interrupted by World War I. The Bolsheviks forced the Esaus to flee to Germany in December, 1918, where she enrolled in an agricultural college called the Berlin Landwirtschaftliche Hochschule. There she earned her bachelor’s degree to be an agricultural teacher (“Landwirtschaftlehrerin”), and she passed an advanced test in plant breeding.

Germany’s economy was a disaster in the early 1920s. So in 1922 her family emigrated to Reedley (southeast of Fresno), where there was a Mennonite community.

In Reedley, an acquaintance told Esau of a position researching sugar beets in Oxnard. She was in Ventura County just one year when the company folded. But a colleague in Oxnard helped her get a job at Spreckels in Salinas, where Esau worked to breed sugar beets resistant to curly-top disease.

Following a graduation ceremony in Berkeley, Robbins — who recruited her to come to Davis after a chance meeting at Spreckels — hired Esau as a junior professor of botany in 1932. She was the only female in her department in Davis at that time. She didn’t consider her gender an issue.

“I never worried about being a woman,” she said in a 1992 interview. “It never occurred to me that that was an important thing. I always thought that women could do just as well as men.”

In 1930, her parents also moved to Davis. After the Esau family rented several residences, they built the small, extant house at 237 First Street. She was living there when she wrote the textbook, Plant Anatomy (1953). She was also famous for Anatomy of Seed Plants (1960) and The Phloem (1969).

According to a brief bio by UCSB’s Cheadle Center, “Dr. Esau was especially well known for her beautifully written and comprehensive textbooks. Her first book on plant anatomy for John Wiley and Sons was begun in the late 1940s. Plant Anatomy was published in 1953, and it became a classic almost immediately.

“The book was and still is fondly called the ‘bible’ for structural botanists. Dr. Esau’s developmental approach and thorough presentation of the structure and development of a wide variety of economically important plants resulted in a book that revitalized plant anatomy throughout the world.”

In 1949, Esau, who never married, became a full professor. After Robbins retired in 1951, UC Davis hired Vernon Cheadle as the botany department chair. Cheadle and Esau became close friends and research collaborators.

In 1962, Cheadle was appointed chancellor of UC Santa Barbara. Katherine Esau left her position at UC Davis to join him at UCSB, where she remained the rest of her life.

Much of her work was focused on phloem — the vascular tissue in plants that conducts sugars and other metabolic products downward from the leaves. Esau discovered that the virus spreads through plants along the phloem.

“Although she retired from teaching in 1965, she continued her research into her 90s, publishing more than 150 books and articles before passing away in 1997 at the age of 99 years old,” according to her Cheadle Center bio.

During her career, Esau was recognized for her many achievements in science. In 1949, she was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; 1951, she was chosen as the president of the Botanical Society of America; 1957, she was the sixth woman elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences; 1964, she was elected to the American Philosophical Society; and in 1989, President Bush awarded her the National Medal of Science.

— Rich Rifkin is a Davis resident; his column is published every other week. Reach him at Lxartist@yahoo.com.

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