Appliance Repair in Raisin City, CA

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Raisin City, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

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Latest News in Raisin City, CA

Prima Wawona Announces Raisin City Redevelopment Project; Eric Beringause and Mark Murai Comment

Sponsored MessageOur SunGold™ Kiwi variety will have shoppers saying, ‘Boom, that’s sweet!’ and buyers saying ‘Boom, they’re back for more!’ Learn MoreCUTLER, CA - I am an absolute stonefruit enthusiast. The category offers continuous excitement not just from a consumer standpoint, but from a trade member’s perspecti...

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Our SunGold™ Kiwi variety will have shoppers saying, ‘Boom, that’s sweet!’ and buyers saying ‘Boom, they’re back for more!’ Learn More

CUTLER, CA - I am an absolute stonefruit enthusiast. The category offers continuous excitement not just from a consumer standpoint, but from a trade member’s perspective as well. That is why I was delighted to hear of Prima Wawona’s latest expansion initiative. The company has transformed 2,100 acres of almond trees into stonefruit trees as part of its Raisin City redevelopment.

“With this grand-scale redevelopment project, Prima Wawona becomes the largest stonefruit grower in the World but also the most sustainable stonefruit company. We are the sole stonefruit grower that is fully integrated with our own proprietary genetics and breeding programs. Our irrigation management systems are state-of-the-art and second to none, enabling us to grow big, juicy, delicious stonefruit while minimizing water and chemical usage. Prima Wawona continues to expand our commitment to organic farming with new acreage devoted to organics every season. The future looks very bright!” said Chief Executive Officer, Eric Beringause.

The redevelopment project is a strategic growth play as the company looks to maintain its position as a leader in the category. In addition to expanded capacity, the project will bring more local jobs and a significant increase in employment for the Fresno County area.

For this project, Prima Wawona will implement new sustainable agriculture practices, including 32 water wells powered by a 5-acre solar farm. Using the most modern irrigation technology, water savings of 30–40 percent per acre will be achieved, according to a press release. Prima Wawona will also utilize advanced organic farming techniques and food safety practices to provide exceptional tree fruit.

“This planting represents a significant commitment to our employees, customers, and consumers. We have carefully selected varieties that will complement our current portfolio of varieties, building more consistent supply and eating experience. We’re excited to dedicate significant acreage to our breeding program’s newest cultivars,” added Mark Murai, Chief Agricultural Officer.

Take it from this stonefruit lover: more news from the exciting category is on the way, so don’t go anywhere.

Fresno woman feels saddened, disoriented as she witnesses the removal of raisin vineyards

I’m upset. Raisins have been produced in the Fresno area for almost 150 years. We used to be the “Raisin Capital of the World.” Now, our local vineyards are being razed at an alarming rate. Our old identity has run its course. All I hear is a death rattle.Take a short ride outside the boundaries of our ever-expanding cities and towns and look around. You’ll understand what I’m talking about. Those of you living near an almond orchard or a mandarin grove already know. A life ends gradually, yet halts with ...

I’m upset. Raisins have been produced in the Fresno area for almost 150 years. We used to be the “Raisin Capital of the World.” Now, our local vineyards are being razed at an alarming rate. Our old identity has run its course. All I hear is a death rattle.

Take a short ride outside the boundaries of our ever-expanding cities and towns and look around. You’ll understand what I’m talking about. Those of you living near an almond orchard or a mandarin grove already know. A life ends gradually, yet halts with a sobering force.

On a recent visit to a cemetery in Fowler, I was bothered by an unexpected view. Across the avenue, a large vineyard had been leveled. The next day, I returned for another look. Crinkly vine stumps were strewn across the land as if they were revolutionaries who had lost the battle. At the edge of a felled row was a lone grapevine, maybe 2 years old, still stuck in the dirt. A protective, slightly moldy paper wrapper covered its base. Burchell Nursery, it said. This was probably a replacement vine placed into the ground when there was still hope.

The plant had a bright energy radiating through its core. I could feel it. Tiny green leaves had begun to push out through a cane, as all grapevines do in March. But this specimen’s days were numbered. A field worker’s shovel would soon call its fate, the fate of a thousand other vines that lay flattened before me. Vineyards planted during my grandparents’ time lasted a hundred years. This farmer had given up the ghost.

With a couple of phone calls, I could have learned the owner’s name. I didn’t have the heart. I’d already heard enough stories of late. A friend was struggling to find someone to lease her vineyard. Another friend began to weep in my car as she considered the possibility of losing the vines she knew as a child.

Viticulture isn’t easy. The price of farm labor is high. So is the cost of electricity to pump water and fertilizer to support the land. To ease these burdens, some farmers have gravitated toward drip irrigation or mechanized picking. But even with these cost-saving measures, producing raisins hardly pencils out when you’re not getting a good price for your product. Many raisin farmers have transitioned to new crops. Others have abandoned tangled rows altogether until they decide what to do next. Anyone associated with the raisin industry has been pressed into some kind of corner.

In 2000, an estimated 280,000 acres of raisin grapes were harvested in California, a peak number. By 2020, the bearing acreage had declined to 145,000. I don’t think Americans are eating less trail mix or raisin toast than we were 20 years ago. But other countries are producing raisins more cheaply than we are. I’ve been told only 20 percent of the world’s supply currently originates from California. This percentage used to be much higher.

It could be that not all the raisins you’re eating were even grown in the Central Valley. There are whispers that some of the raisins packed locally are being supplemented with foreign product. If this is true, where are these raisins coming from? Turkey? Iran? China? No one is talking.

There are also complaints that the middlemen and women, the raisin packers themselves, haven’t always played well in the sandbox. There’s a sense they’ve been making large profits on the backs of small farmers who are operating within tight margins. At a national level, similar complaints can be heard throughout the farming industry, regardless of commodity. Meanwhile, it’s too late to fix the issues for the farmers who have already moved on.

I admit my perspective is a sentimental one. I grew up on a vineyard that no longer exists. If I tend to romanticize the lost topography of the Central Valley, I’m not ashamed. I don’t see land as a means to an end, a simple spot on the Earth to grow a peach, a grape, or a house. I see the agricultural fields that surround us as a mirror reflecting the parts of ourselves that are most human and vital.

In this place, mourning doves fly over old vineyards and new orchards to land in our backyards. A shared connection rises from their spring birdsong, no matter how pixilated and otherworldly our individual lives become.

COVID outbreaks in rural schools impact students, families beyond the classroom

The Central Valley News Collaborative includes The Fresno Bee, Vida en el Valle, Valley Public Radio and Radio Bilingüe. The project was announced in late 2020 and began its work in 2021 with the Collaborative's reporters shining a light on how the Central Valley’s communities of color have been disproportionately impacted, physically and financially, by COVID-19. The Collaborative is now exploring how the drought and climate change could reshape the valley, and the lives of the people who work in the agriculture industry. The Col...

The Central Valley News Collaborative includes The Fresno Bee, Vida en el Valle, Valley Public Radio and Radio Bilingüe. The project was announced in late 2020 and began its work in 2021 with the Collaborative's reporters shining a light on how the Central Valley’s communities of color have been disproportionately impacted, physically and financially, by COVID-19. The Collaborative is now exploring how the drought and climate change could reshape the valley, and the lives of the people who work in the agriculture industry. The Collaborative is supported by the Central Valley Community Foundation, with technology and training support by Microsoft Corp.

Laura Garcia stands outside her home with two of her kids and their ducks, chickens and goats in Raisin City, a small unincorporated community southwest of Fresno. It’s a morning in early September, and she’s wearing a mask because her oldest daughter, Jennifer, who attends Raisin City Elementary school, tested positive for COVID-19 in late August.

She suspects her daughter contracted the virus at school. She says she reached out to other parents in her daughter’s class to let them know.

“When I told the parents that my daughter tested positive, some of them said their children were feeling the symptoms so they tested them as well and they were positive,” she says in Spanish.

At least three students in Garcia’s daughter’s class tested positive for the virus. Following Fresno County Health Department guidelines, school officials sent all the kids in the class home to quarantine for nearly a week after Labor Day.

COVID-19 cases among youth were increasing last month as students started the school year. Cases have since declined. But even small COVID-19 outbreaks at schools can have major impacts on families in rural communities.

The virus, of course, spread beyond the school children. In total, four of Garcia’s kids contracted the virus. Garcia and her husband, who is the family's sole provider, also got it. He’s vaccinated and works in the fields.

“It affects us because he is the only one that works to pay the rent, to buy stuff for the kids, and to pay all our bills,” she says.

Garcia and her husband are undocumented. Since they don’t qualify for many forms of government assistance, they’ve turned to friends and family for help buying groceries.

Survey Finds Latinx Families Struggled With Income and Learning Loss During Pandemic

The Garcia family isn’t the only one facing loss of income and education due to the pandemic.

An estimated 44% of Latinx parents nationwide reported an interruption in employment due to child care, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey published in late August. It also shows that half of Latino parents with incomes below $40,000 reported their children fell behind academically.

Carmen Cuautenco Leon’s 13-year-old daughter is another one of the eighth graders at Raisin City Elementary School who tested positive for COVID-19. Cuautenco Leon is a single mother of three. She says she also had to take time off from her work in the fields to care for her child. But her biggest concern is the learning loss that her children faced through the pandemic and again while quarantined.

“They’re very behind and of course they need to go to school, but we also need to take care of the health of our kids,” she says in Spanish.

Tania Pacheco-Werner is co-director of the Central Valley Health Policy Institute at Fresno State. She says many people in rural communities have lower education levels and fewer job opportunities. She says that creates a perfect storm, making it difficult for residents to take time off work to care for their children.

“We see that burden falls especially hard on rural families who don't have a lot of other options other than not getting an income during the time that their children have to stay home,” she says.

To prevent parents from losing income while taking care of quarantined kids, Pacheco-Werner says it’s important that local officials collaborate on how to protect students. That’s especially needed in smaller rural districts.

“It's going to take a state-coordinated, school-wide, school-based effort to really think through how to begin testing and surveillance in those places that simply don't have the infrastructure to do it themselves,” Pacheco-Werner says.

Rural Families Struggle With Learning Loss While Quarantined

Victoria Morales, a mother of five, says Raisin City Elementary School is one of those places that lacks the infrastructure. She doesn’t have any kids in the school's eighth grade class but she says school officials sent her 8-year-old daughter home on a Monday after mistaking the girl’s asthma attack for a symptom of COVID-19.

“They said she couldn’t come back until she had a negative result and that Thursday the doctors called and said she was negative,” she says.

But Morales says she didn’t get the written proof of the negative result until the following week. She says her daughter and two of her other children, who were also sent home because they lived in the same household, missed out on a week's worth of learning. That’s in addition to the learning loss they experienced during the pandemic.

Nearly three weeks after the Raisin City class was sent home to quarantine, Laura Gracia and Carmen Cuautenco Leon’s families have recovered from their symptoms. But their kids are still recovering from the learning loss and Garcia says her husband’s employer still hasn’t paid him for the two weeks he was in quarantine.

This story is part of the Central Valley News Collaborative, which is supported by the Central Valley Community Foundation with technology and training support by Microsoft Corp.

Local festival hopes to inspire Latinas to expand their horizons

RAISIN CITY, Calif. (KFSN) -- A Central Valley woman is working to help her fellow Latinas expand their horizons while celebrating their culture.On Saturday, May 8, one local festival in Raisin City will host vendors from across the state for a powerful event. Local women will share their stories to inspire other women to pursue their dreams regardless of where they are in life."There is an unbalanced balance to pursuing your dreams and goals, and you don't have to sacrifice your family," said Alejandra Torres, the fe...

RAISIN CITY, Calif. (KFSN) -- A Central Valley woman is working to help her fellow Latinas expand their horizons while celebrating their culture.

On Saturday, May 8, one local festival in Raisin City will host vendors from across the state for a powerful event. Local women will share their stories to inspire other women to pursue their dreams regardless of where they are in life.

"There is an unbalanced balance to pursuing your dreams and goals, and you don't have to sacrifice your family," said Alejandra Torres, the festival's founder.

Torres is a Central Valley native who had the vision to bring Latinas together for an event that would provide inspiration, resources, and moral support.

But the pandemic forced her to put that dream on pause.

"It was sad. I was going to give up on this and thank God for people like Sonia, who encouraged me and said, 'let's just do it!'" Torres said.

Torres says she's had to overcome a number of challenges to achieve success in her business and personal life, and now she wants to help other Latinas realize how strong they are.

"We need to be loud about who we are, not to be egotistic, but hey, I came from a humble beginning, my parents were farm workers, and I was able to acquire the American life, " said Torres.

The event will have six Latina speakers sharing their stories; 49-year-old Sonia Arreguin is one of them.

She is President of the Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, a mother, wife, full-time employee, and currently pursuing her Ph.D."It was something that I have been wanting to do for a while, so the question was if not now than when. I hope if someone hears my story, they will think, 'If she can do it, so can I,'" said Arreguin.

Torres says although the event is geared toward Latina women, everyone is welcome to participate in what is expected to be a positive and motivating atmosphere.

"This, I think, is one of the first events that is opening up and saying, 'hey come, let's gather, hear music and inspire one another,'" said Torres.

Over 40 vendors from across California will be present, and CDC guidelines, including wearing a mask and social distancing, will be encouraged.

Tickets are $25. You can buy them here or at the door. If you know a vendor, you can reach out to them for a discounted price.

The event kicks off at 11:00 am and goes until 6:00 pm at Hacienda La ALborada located at 9199 S Bryan Ave, Raisin City, CA 93652.

NorCal Millionaires Made In 2021: California Lottery

You can't win if you don't play. Here's who won the biggest prizes in Northern California this year.LIVERMORE, CA— Who won the biggest lottery prizes in Northern Califonia this year? Here is the 2021 California Lottery Winner breakdown:Cayucos: Ca Windhousen: $1 million on a Million Dollar Multiplier Scratchers. The ticket was purchased at Cayucos Market located at 301 South Ocean Avenue in Cayucos (San Luis Obispo County).Bethel Island: John O'Sullivan: $1 million on a $10 Cash Bonus Scratchers ticket. O'Sulliva...

You can't win if you don't play. Here's who won the biggest prizes in Northern California this year.

LIVERMORE, CA— Who won the biggest lottery prizes in Northern Califonia this year? Here is the 2021 California Lottery Winner breakdown:

Cayucos: Ca Windhousen: $1 million on a Million Dollar Multiplier Scratchers. The ticket was purchased at Cayucos Market located at 301 South Ocean Avenue in Cayucos (San Luis Obispo County).

Bethel Island: John O'Sullivan: $1 million on a $10 Cash Bonus Scratchers ticket. O'Sullivan bought his ticket at Bethel Market located at 6235 Bethel Island Road in Bethel Island (Contra Costa County).

Rocklin: Eng Ea: $2 million on the popular $20 Instant Prize Crossword Scratchers ticket she purchased at Rocklin Mini Mart, which is located at 4505 Pacific Street in Rocklin (Placer County).

Sacramento: Carlton Williams: $750,000 prize on the $10 Mystery Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased his winning ticket at Kargill Arco Elder Creek located at 8024 Elder Creek Road in Sacramento (Sacramento County).

Tulare: Jesus Champion: $750,000 prize on the $10 Mystery Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased his ticket at Woodville Liquor located at 16768 Avenue 168 in Tulare (Tulare County).

Salinas: Stella Ramirez: $1 million on a Merry & Bright Scratchers ticket purchased at West Market Valero, located at 633 West Market Street in Salinas (Monterey County).

Watsonville: Cristoval Montejano-Rocha: $1 million on a California Dreamin' Scratchers ticket. Purchased his lucky ticket at Pajaro Valley Chevron located at 200 Lee Road in Watsonville (Santa Cruz County).

San Leandro: Oscar Ramirez: $750,000 prize on a Mystery Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Town & Country Liquors located at 16211 East 14th Street. (Alameda County).

Greenfield: Rafael Monroy: $750,000 on a Mystery Crossword ticket. Purchased at Greenfield Market located at 348 El Camino Real in Greenfield (Monterey County).

San Francisco: MEGA MILLIONS: California Lottery player who purchased a Mega Millions ticket at a supermarket in San Francisco's Inner Richmond neighborhood has won a $1,806,354 prize (less federal taxes). The ticket matched five of the six winning numbers (43-52-49- 23-6) from last night's draw, missing only the Mega number (5). The winning ticket was purchased at Richmond New May Wah Supermarket, which is located at 707 711 Clement Street in San Francisco.

Hayward: Joseph P. Escusa: $750,000 prize won on a $10 Mystery Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Karavan Liquors located at 27445 Hesperian Boulevard in Hayward (Alameda County).

Sacramento: Darius Williams: $5 million on the $5,000,000 Platinum Payout Scratchers game. The Safeway supermarket is located at 2851 Del Paso Road in the North Natomas area of Sacramento.

Daly City: Pedro Escobar Hernandez: $20,000 A Month For 25 Years ($6 million before Taxes) won on a $10 Set For Life Scratchers ticket. Purchased at 88th St. Fuels, 2428 Junipero Serra Boulevard in Daly City. This retailer will receive a bonus of $30,000 for selling the winning ticket. Daly City (San Mateo County).

Rio Linda: Drucilla Ferguson: $1 million on a Million Dollar Multiplier Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Stop And Shop Market, located at 6007 Dry Creek Road in Rio Linda. This retailer will receive a bonus of $5,000 for selling the winning ticket.

Petaluma: Sylvia Garcia: $10 million on an Ultimate Millions Scratchers ticket. Purchased at the 7-Eleven located on Lakeville Highway in Petaluma (Sonoma County).

Dublin: Romeo Quinto Jr.: $5 million on the Luck Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Fallon Gate Chevron located at 2760 Dublin Boulevard in Dublin (Alameda County)

Oakland: Jai McLin: $2 million on the Instant Prize Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Oakland Liquor & Market located at 1335 17th Street in Oakland (Alameda County).

San Jose: Hue Tiet: $1.2 million on a Set For Life Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Jackson Pure Water located at 301 North Jackson Avenue, #7B in San Jose (Santa Clara County).

Fresno: Francisco Rocha Jr.: $1 million on a Million Dollar Multiplier Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Pic N Go II located at 138 North Maple Avenue in Fresno (Fresno County).

Lindsay: Jebr Alfarah: $5 million on a 2021 Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Sierra Express Mart located at 508 South Mirage Avenue in Lindsay (Tulare County).

Solvang: Michael Snyder: $5 million on a 100X Scratchers ticket. Purchased at 608 Alamo Pintado Road in Solvang (Santa Barbara County).

Los Banos: Lawrence Carvalho: $2 million on an Instant Prize Crossword Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Chevron Food Mart located at 1164 Pacheco Boulevard in Los Banos (Merced County).

Riverdale: Juan Salazar Varela: $1 million on a Million Dollar Multiplier Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Riverdale Liquor located at 3428 West Mount Whitney Avenue in Riverdale (Fresno County).

Fresno: Theresa Mason: $1 million on a Merry & Bright Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Broadway Liquor Mart #2 located at 7089 North Barks Avenue #111 in Fresno (Fresno County).

La Puente: Mega Millions: A winning Mega Millions ticket sold in La Puente (Los Angeles County) matched the numbers 67-26-17-52-18, just missing the Mega number of 19. That lucky ticket is worth $1,001,371. The winning ticket was sold at the Fastrip Food Store located at 1400 Valinda Avenue in La Puente (Los Angeles County). The Fastrip Food Store receives a bonus of $5,006 for selling that winning ticket.

Kingsburg: Lori Bachmeyer: $10 million on a 200X Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Shop & Go located at 38440 Highway 99 in Kingsburg (Fresno County) and that retailer will receive $50,000 for selling the winning ticket.

Bakersfield: Ryan Koonce: $5 million on a Luck Scratchers ticket. Purchased at 7-Eleven located at 2636 River Boulevard in Bakersfield (Kern County).

Stockton: Vilmer Vigil Jr.: $5 million on a Golden State Riches Scratchers ticket. Purchased at the Arco AM/PM located at 1206 East March Lane in Stockton (San Joaquin County).

Rio Linda: Kristy Whitaker: $3 million on a Set For Life ticket. Purchased at Stop & Shop Market located at 6007 Dry Creek Road in Rio Linda (Sacramento County).

Four players won $2 million prizes all playing the same popular Scratchers game, Instant Prize Crossword.

Wasco: Sukwinder Singh: $2 million on a ticket he bought at Quick N Super Mini Mart located at 1101 7th Street in Wasco (Kern County).

San Francisco: Vince Valencia: $2 million on a ticket purchased at CVS Pharmacy located at 1204 San Fernando Road in San Francisco (San Francisco County).

Oroville: Wilman Santos Garcia: $2 million on a ticket purchased at Lakeside Market located at 5250 Olive Highway in Oroville (Butte County).

Bakersfield: Tammy James: $2 million on a ticket she bought at Howard's Mini Mart located at 4201 Belle Terrace in Bakersfield (Kern County).

San Francisco Mega Millions Winner: Roselie Burhop: $1,806,358 playing Mega Millions. Burhop bought her winning ticket at Richmond New May Wah Supermarket at 707 711 Clement Street in San Francisco (San Francisco County). Burhop tearily explained that she chose her numbers by playing her family's birthdates and plans to pay for her childrens' and grandchildrens' educations with this money. She continued, "Education is very important, it's a blessing and helping my family makes me happy."

Yuba City: Powerball Winner: One unidentified winner earned $1,361,359. The ticket, which matched five of the six numbers, was sold at 7-Eleven located at 1605 Butte House Road in Yuba City (Sutter County). That retailer will receive a bonus of $6,806 for selling the winning ticket. The ticket matched the numbers 32-17-2-7-11 but missed the Powerball number 11.

Butte County: Madison Harrison: $2 million on an Instant Prize Crossword Scratchers purchased at Jiffy Food Store located at 140 Oro Dam Boulevard in Oroville (Butte County).

San Franciso: Danh Pham: $5 million on a 100X Scratchers purchased at L & J Groceries located at 21 Leland Avenue in San Francisco (San Francisco County).

Mountain View: Jimwell Castro: $1 million on a Multiplier Mania Scratchers purchased at Mountain View Unocal located at 101 East El Camino Real in Mountain View (Santa Clara County).

San Jose: Ngan Nguyen: $2 million on an Instant Prize Crossword Scratchers purchased at Dolce Espresso located at 2078 Tully Road in San Jose (Santa Clara County).

Oakdale: Mathew Rosas: $1 million on a Silver and Gold Scratchers purchased at the 7-Eleven located at 1138 West F Street in Oakdale (Stanislaus County).

Castroville: Berta Rocha: $1 million on a Red Hot 10's Scratchers purchased at Castroville Market located at 10696 Merritt Street in Castroville (Monterey County).

Morro Bay: A POWERBALL WINNER: $699.82 Million went months without revealing his identity. The winning ticket matched all six winning numbers (66-12-22-54-69, Powerball 15) was sold at Albertsons located at 730 Quintana Road. Morro Bay (San Luis Obispo County).

Sacramento: A winning Powerball ticket worth $1,675,676 was sold at the often lucky Lichine's Liquor & Deli at 7107 S. Land Park Drive. The winning ticket matched five numbers in last night's drawing (8-32-55-64-66), missing only the Mega number (10). Lichine's will receive more than $8,000 for selling the winning ticket.

Raisin City: Reyna Tamez Angulo: $5 million on a 100X Scratchers ticket. Purchased at Bee's Market located at 6201 West Bowles Avenue in Raisin City (Fresno County). Bee's Market will each receive a $25,000 bonus for selling winning $5 million tickets.

Did we miss some winners? Let us know by emailing your Patch editor.

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