Appliance Repair in Orange Cove, CA

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Orange Cove, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Orange Cove, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Orange Cove, CA

Fresno-area prep softball: Big Top 25 matchups this week; back-to-back no-hitters

Big matchups loom for The Fresno Bee’s Top 25 high school softball teams this week.No. 2 Clovis faced No. 4 Central in a big Tri-River Athletic Conference contest on Tuesday. The Cougars won that matchup 3-0 behind Lauryn Carranco’s 12 strikeouts.Gracie Carpenter had two RBI.The Cougars improved to 13-2 overall and 1-0 in the TRAC. The Grizzlies fell to 11-3 and 0-1 in the TRAC.Clovis has won five straight after losing 8-0 to Oaks Christian on March 11. Following Central, the Cougars host No. 3 Buchana...

Big matchups loom for The Fresno Bee’s Top 25 high school softball teams this week.

No. 2 Clovis faced No. 4 Central in a big Tri-River Athletic Conference contest on Tuesday. The Cougars won that matchup 3-0 behind Lauryn Carranco’s 12 strikeouts.

Gracie Carpenter had two RBI.

The Cougars improved to 13-2 overall and 1-0 in the TRAC. The Grizzlies fell to 11-3 and 0-1 in the TRAC.

Clovis has won five straight after losing 8-0 to Oaks Christian on March 11. Following Central, the Cougars host No. 3 Buchanan.

The Grizzlies’ seven-game win streak came to an end.

The Bee’s top-ranked Clovis North defeated No. 22 Clovis West 1-0 behind Ryan Maddox’s 21 strikeouts and one-hitter (a bunt single). The Broncos will next face Clovis East on Thursday.

? Anahi Castillo hit two home runs and finished with six RBI to lead Orange Cove over Caruthers 15-7.

? Eliza Gamez of Redwood finished with a double and five RBI to lead the Rangers past Reedley 12-5.

? Megan Staton pitched her second straight (with 12 strikeouts) in Central Valley Christian’s 11-0 victory over Exeter.

? Mia Traylor struck out 13 and had a no-hitter and Jayden Ramos had a two-run home and four RBI to lead Central past Kingsburg 11-0.

? Esmeralda Zuniga of McLane had an inside-the-park home run that drove in three runs to lead the Highlanders to a 6-4 victory over Edison.

Easter tournaments will take place beginning Saturday with the Clovis East Tournament, Tulare Easter Classic and Fowler Easter Classic.

The Washington Union Spring Classic is Monday-Tuesday.

(Records through Monday)

1. Clovis North 10-0 (Pvs.1)

2. Clovis 12-2 (Pvs.2)

3. Buchanan 11-3 (Pvs.3)

4. Central 11-2 (Pvs.5)

5. Stockdale 9-4 (Pvs.6)

6. Liberty-Bakersfield 12-2 (Pvs.4)

7. Paso Robles 13-4 (Pvs.9)

8. Bullard 7-4 (Pvs.10)

9. Hanford 8-5 (Pvs.7)

10. Liberty-Madera Ranchos 11-3 (Pvs.11)

11. St. Joseph 12-6 (Pvs.8)

12. Independence 14-7 (Pvs.14)

13. Tulare Union 10-3-1 (Pvs.15)

14. Tulare Western 13-5-1 (Pvs. 16)

15. El Diamante 8-5 (Pvs.17)

16. Centennial 13-5-1 (Pvs.18)

17. Frontier 9-10 (Pvs.12)

18. Garces 10-9 (Pvs.13)

19. Monache 7-4-1 (Pvs. 20)

20. Dinuba 9-6 (Pvs.19)

21. Golden West 8-5 (Pvs.24)

22. Clovis West 8-7 (Pvs. 21)

23. Redwood 8-4-1 (Pvs. 25)

24. San Luis Obispo 9-5-1 (Pvs. 22)

25. Fowler 9-4 (Pvs. 23)

On the bubble: Mission Prep (11-3), Highland (14-5), Kingsburg (9-8), Mission Oak (7-4-1), Garces (10-9), Chowchilla (7-4) Wasco (12-3), North (9-10), Morro Bay (9-1-1), Immanuel (10-6), Mt. Whitney (8-5), San Joaquin Memorial (8-6-1), Arroyo Grande (9-8-1), Reedley (7-6-1), Sanger (8-6), Central Valley Christian (5-3), Caruthers (6-6).

This story was originally published April 6, 2022 11:18 AM.

SUN-MAID SEATS SIX NEW CREATIVE KIDS FOR SECOND BOARD OF IMAGINATION CLASS

Imaginative Minds Meet on National Raisin Day – April 30 – to Transition Board, Inaugurate New Kids, Meet Sun-Maid ExecutivesFRESNO, Calif., April 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Imaginations are igniting for six kids who will contribute to Sun-Maid's innovation and success, as a part of a real Board of decision-makers. After a nationwide search for kids to be part of the second year of the ...

Imaginative Minds Meet on National Raisin Day – April 30 – to Transition Board, Inaugurate New Kids, Meet Sun-Maid Executives

FRESNO, Calif., April 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Imaginations are igniting for six kids who will contribute to Sun-Maid's innovation and success, as a part of a real Board of decision-makers. After a nationwide search for kids to be part of the second year of the Board of Imagination, Sun-Maid – the imaginative and iconic raisin brand – is announcing the six kids who will be a part of its focus and decision-making group. Five kids were named from an open vote from the public, and the sixth board member comes from an internal search from kids of Sun-Maid manufacturing employees.

Together, the six imaginative kids will join Sun-Maid executives throughout the next year, where they will influence and provide feedback from Sun-Maid's snacking innovations, while learning about the brand and acting as Sun-Maid ambassadors to their schools. As part of their time on the board, each member will receive $5,000 for themselves in the form of a 529 donation, and $5,000 to go to their school to spend on anything that fosters imagination. The kids' schools will also enjoy a delicious supply of Sun-Maid snacks, which will be delivered during the 2022 – 2023 school year.

"Our newest Board of Imagination members exude pure imagination, with palpable energy, big ideas and open minds – all critical to Sun-Maid's innovation strategy," said Harry Overly, President, CEO and Chief Imagination Wrangler of Sun-Maid Growers of California. "These kids proved their potential, rallied their communities and generated thousands of votes – we can't wait for the collaboration and imagination that the new class of Board of Imagination promises to deliver."

The search for new Board of Imagination members began in January with a call for applications. After nearly 1,000 applications, the field narrowed to 11 finalists who were put to a public vote with video submissions for each finalist, which showcased the kids' answers to imaginative challenges about inventing a new Sun-Maid raisin snack or using Sun-Maid's little red raisin box. More than 10,000 votes poured in to decide the board members.

The 2022-2023 Board of Imagination Kid members are:

The first board meeting is in-person as these thinkers are invited to Sun-Maid headquarters in Fresno, California to partake in a jam-packed weekend filled with imagination and fun. The first year's Board of Imagination members will be there to pass the baton to the incoming class, as they were unable to visit in-person last year due to COVID-19. This hand-off coincides with National Raisin Day (April 30th) and Sun-Maid's Day of Imagination celebration, taking place at their plant. The itinerary includes exposure to Sun-Maid's growing process – with a tour of a nearby vineyard and manufacturing – as the kids and their families don hard hats to visit the plant.

For more information about Sun-Maid's snacks and commitment to imagination, visit www.sunmaid.com/imaginethat. Also on the website, consumers can use the product locator to find the brand's whole fruit snacks in a store nearest them or visit the Sun-Maid Market to purchase snacks. For more updates on the brand and its products, follow Sun-Maid on Facebook (@Sun-Maid), Instagram (@SunMaid), Twitter (@Sun_Maid) and TikTok (@SunMaid).

About Sun-Maid Growers of CaliforniaFounded in 1912, Sun-Maid Growers of California is a farmer's cooperative of 750 grower families with vineyards in California's Central Valley. From childhood to adulthood and generation to generation, Sun-Maid's innovative snacks continue to feed imaginations one little red box at a time--because when imagination is used for good, there's nothing more delicious! And while some things change, our real, minimally processed and consistently good ingredients haven't. Always starting with a whole fruit you can see and taste, Sun-Maid continues to offer a trusted go-to snack that's simple, healthy and versatile--imagine that! For more information about Sun-Maid visit www.sunmaid.com and follow the brand on social media including TikTok, Instagram and Twitter.

SOURCE Sun-Maid

Despite cutbacks to the rest of the state, some ag districts get full allotment of water

Even as most agricultural water supplies are being cut to the bone, with California descending into a third year of extreme drought, the San Joaquin River Exchange Contractor districts will apparently receive 650,000 acre feet — 100% of their “critical year” allotment.The move is just one of the quirks in California’s byzantine world of water rights.The federal Bureau of Reclamation has increased the amount of water coming out of the Friant Dam above Fresno to help satisfy its contract with the Exchange ...

Even as most agricultural water supplies are being cut to the bone, with California descending into a third year of extreme drought, the San Joaquin River Exchange Contractor districts will apparently receive 650,000 acre feet — 100% of their “critical year” allotment.

The move is just one of the quirks in California’s byzantine world of water rights.

The federal Bureau of Reclamation has increased the amount of water coming out of the Friant Dam above Fresno to help satisfy its contract with the Exchange Contractors. That water normally goes to Friant Water Authority and its member agencies which are spread more than 150 miles up and down the east side of the San Joaquin Valley. Calls to the Authority weren’t returned.

The Friant Dam is part of the Central Valley Project, a more than 400-mile network of federal canals and dams that transport water to farms and towns throughout the San Joaquin Valley. But different agencies have different rights when it comes to the federal water.

The Exchange Contractors consist of four agricultural water districts that extend from Newman to Firebaugh on the west side of the Valley. When the federal government built the Central Valley Project in the 1930s, it took San Joaquin River water from existing water users and moved it to Friant contractors in the southern part of the Valley. In “exchange,” the federal government promised the original river users water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. That promise still carries on, and the Exchange Contractors have a higher priority to water, based on their government contract.

But extreme drought conditions mean there isn’t enough water in the delta to satisfy that contract. So, water being held behind Friant Dam is being sent to the Exchange Contractors instead. On April 1, the Bureau of Reclamation increased the Friant Dam releases from 680 cubic feet per second to 930 cfs to meet the Exchange Contractors’ needs, according to a Reclamation announcement. That amount will increase into the spring. Over the summer, releases will exceed 1,700 cfs.

The Bureau of Reclamation slashed water supplies for most others in the state. The Sacramento Valley Settlement Contractors are getting only 18% of their allocation and south of delta and north of delta irrigators are getting 0%.

Friant contractors were told they would receive 15% of their 800,000 acre feet contract which will go to “Class 1” water users. The relatively low 15% allocation is so the Bureau could hold water for the Exchange Contractors, in case there wasn’t enough coming from the delta.

But that 15% allocation could dwindle away to even less, wrote Fergus Morrissey, general manager of Friant contractor Orange Cove Irrigation District, in an email. Flows will “increase as the demand for water by the Exchange Contractors ramps up heading into the irrigation season.”

“We’re thinking about there being some change in it because of this action,” said Michael Jackson, area manager for the Bureau of Reclamation’s south central California area office, on the potential decrease in Friant’s allocation.

The flows for the Exchange Contractors could last until September, he added.

“We’ll do our due diligence to meet our obligations under the exchange contract,” said Jackson. “This year is so dry; I don’t do promises anyway, but no guarantees.”

Friant Dam water is rarely taken for the Exchange Contractors. But it happened in 2014-15, when Friant received a 0% allocation so Reclamation could satisfy the Exchange Contractors’ water supply. That decision resulted in Friant users suing the federal government; the lawsuit is ongoing.

“It hasn’t happened very many times over the years,” said Kole Upton, farmer and chairman of Friant contractor Chowchilla Water District, on Friant Dam water going to the Exchange Contractors. “But it is part of the lexicon that we deal with, so it’s not something that was unexpected for us.”

The lack of surface water means farmers will turn to pumping groundwater to sustain their crops, Upton said.

“It’s going to cause the underground to drop more,” he said.

That could be a major problem for small disadvantaged communities such as Fairmead, where crops surround the town’s homes as far as the eye can see. In the summer of 2021, small communities saw groundwater levels plummet and domestic wells go dry as surrounding agriculture sucked up the aquifers.

“They’re embedded in our district,” said Upton about disadvantaged communities. “They get water when we get water. It replenishes their underground.”

And even though the state’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act, which aims to bring groundwater back to sustainable levels, has started to take effect, the process is slow going and sustainability isn’t required until 2040. Many irrigation districts aren’t implementing any pumping restrictions.

This story was produced by the nonprofit SJV Water with funding and support from Fresnoland for The Fresno Bee.

Pause on Student Loan Debt Loosened Chokehold on Burdened Borrowers

It’s no secret that millions of Americans old and young are burdened with student loan debt, but the COVID-19 pandemic brought unexpected relief to many low-income borrowers.The pause on federal student loan payments meant burdened borrowers such as David Lozano of Fresno finally had a choice on how to best manage their budgets.In Lozano’s case, the pause allowed him to buy a car, pay off his credit card debt, and take vacations and personal time off without worrying about his student loan payments or accumulating i...

It’s no secret that millions of Americans old and young are burdened with student loan debt, but the COVID-19 pandemic brought unexpected relief to many low-income borrowers.

The pause on federal student loan payments meant burdened borrowers such as David Lozano of Fresno finally had a choice on how to best manage their budgets.

In Lozano’s case, the pause allowed him to buy a car, pay off his credit card debt, and take vacations and personal time off without worrying about his student loan payments or accumulating interest.

And, while the Biden Administration has extended the grace period after it was set to expire on May 1, payments will resume on Sept. 1, the White House announced Tuesday.

Lozano graduated from high school in rural Orange Cove and, like many high school grads, he was eager to earn a degree that would help him land a dream job.

“I ended up going to a private college to study business at first and then it became something else,” said Lozano. “In the end, I accumulated this huge debt that at the time I was in school, I didn’t worry about.”

Unlike many of his peers who opted to attend a four-year state school like Fresno State, Lozano attended a private college for graphic design that promised students the opportunity to finish a degree in two years instead of four.

However, Lozano is now stuck paying double what many low-income students at Fresno State pay in student loan debt. After 10 years of making more than the minimum monthly payments and the two-year repayment pause, Lozano still owes about $30,000.

“It’s already been over a decade and I’ve already paid out maybe a little over half of it and it’s still in the double digits,” said Lozano, who works as a marketing specialist. “It’s the interest that just keeps making me feel like it’s going to keep taking longer and longer.”

According to a recent report from the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, increased savings rates and government stimulus allowed millions of people to pay down debts from credit cards, student loans, and other borrowing.

"When they put out like a temporary freeze on it, they were saying you could pay it off little by little and at first I kind of was," said Lozano. "But then I was thinking, like, you know, let me focus on the other things like I was able to improve my credit and I was able to get an actual car from the dealer."

Lozano began to dream about what he could buy with his extra income including owning his own house — a thought that never crossed his mind before the pandemic.

According to an Urban Institute analysis of credit bureau data, there was an increase in first-time homebuying among student loan borrowers during the payment moratorium — especially for those age 26 and older.

In fact, Lozano and his partner said they went house hunting, but an improved credit score was not enough to compete in Fresno's competitive housing market.

"I wasn't approved for much because they saw how much money I owed," said Lozano. "I spoke to many real estate agents and you know, it was just unfortunate because it's like what we had to offer to pay for a home wasn't enough compared to probably someone else that's already well-established."

A California Policy Lab report shows the average credit score among affected borrowers rose from 640 to 668 over the 24 months from January 2020 to December 2021.

The California Policy Lab estimates that more than 7.8 million borrowers, including about 500,000 Californians, owing $277 billion in student debt, may struggle with repayment of their student loans when the pause ends.

For Lozano, this grace period has helped him achieve goals that he never thought possible. But with student loan debt coming back at some point, he says he will end up having to dip into his savings and possibly add a part-time seasonal job to his busy schedule.

"So now that credit cards are paid off and being able to put money aside for an emergency, it's almost like I'm going to start dipping into that fund," said Lozano. "Once this school debt comes back it's almost like... worst-case scenario, I get a seasonal job."

Ninety Democratic lawmakers pleaded in a letter to Biden to extend the pause on federally-held student loan payments until at least the end of the year and to provide meaningful student debt cancellation.

According to the Education Department, more than 43 million Americans owe a combined $1.6 trillion in student debt held by the federal government. At least 7 million of those borrowers have defaulted on their loans because they were already 270 days late on payments before the pause began.

Staying in these famous SoCal beach cottages isn’t impossible. Here are some tricks

Abject failure is the typical result when I attempt to book a stay at the Crystal Cove Beach Cottages.Still, the challenge hasn’t deterred me from trying. Over the last couple of years, I’ve been able to stay at seven different cottages thanks to a combination of perseverance, flexibility and a sprinkling of luck. And it has been magical.The rustic 1920s- to 1940s-era bungalow rentals are tucked above a stretch of unspoiled beach between Newport Beach and Laguna Beach. The cottages — some with new or worn pain...

Abject failure is the typical result when I attempt to book a stay at the Crystal Cove Beach Cottages.

Still, the challenge hasn’t deterred me from trying. Over the last couple of years, I’ve been able to stay at seven different cottages thanks to a combination of perseverance, flexibility and a sprinkling of luck. And it has been magical.

The rustic 1920s- to 1940s-era bungalow rentals are tucked above a stretch of unspoiled beach between Newport Beach and Laguna Beach. The cottages — some with new or worn paint, others dressed in naked wood shingles, and a few cordoned off with white picket fences — are part of a funky village that’s something of a near 100-year time warp at Crystal Cove State Beach, a slice of untouched coastline.

Crystal Cove State Park has been a special place for me and my family of three, long before I figured out how to snag a cottage. It’s marked some of the most important moments in my life.

Just days before I gave birth to my daughter Cora in 2015, my husband snapped a photo of my very pregnant silhouette. Every year since then, at the same time, date and spot, he has taken the same photo of me — with Cora now on the outside. It’s become something of a tradition.

The park marked a milestone for me as a new mother when it became Cora’s first outing. She was only 2 weeks old and until that time, I was terrified to take her outside of the house.

It’s where we forged magical friendships with an impromptu slumber party at the Shell Shack (Cottage #2). On a whim, I drove to the Crystal Cove Beach Cottage office and got to the reception right before 11 a.m., asking if they had a same-day cancellation. They did. Excitedly, I called my friends Ingrid and Anh, inviting them and their daughters to stay with us for that night. We piled into a large room. The girls were tickled by the Murphy beds and retro kitchen.

Then in March 2020, it was my family’s last hurrah before the early dark days of the pandemic set upon us. At the time, my friend Anh and I basked in the sunny living room of the South Beach Suite (Cottage #16). We gazed out the panoramic windows facing sandy South Beach. We watched our daughters dance along the shore. We wondered out loud whether our lives would change with the novel coronavirus, and for how long.

Before this, I had tried for years to score a cottage on the state website without success. At one point I gave up on it, thinking it was a lost cause. But then I heard from a friend that I might have some luck checking for cancellations from time to time — either online or in-person. It’s a crapshoot but, ever since I started trying, I’ve had luck on several occasions.

After the COVID-19 pandemic came to California, the private rooms in cottages 38, 39 and 29 were converted into full-size cottages for rent. In all, 17 cottages are available for public rental. Nightly prices range from $204 for a two- to three-person cottage up to $288 for a cottage that accommodates six to nine people — a steal, considering beachfront lodging nearby can easily cost $500 a night.

To be clear, this isn’t a fancy beach resort. Quite the opposite. The rooms are rustic, even worn. There’s no room service. If you want your bed made, do it yourself. The kitchens are minimal. Some cottages have nearly full kitchens, others just a minifridge. But the charm and history more than make up for it.

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Crystal Cove began as a small portion of the grand holdings of rancher James Irvine, who acquired a large chunk of Orange County in the late 1800s. Ranch workers were the first to camp at the cove. The 1918 movie “Treasure Island” was filmed at Crystal Cove. Filmmakers re-creating the South Seas left behind palm leaves and thatched shacks.

After the Pacific Coast Highway was completed in 1926, people started taking over the moviemaking remnants or building their own house out of whatever they could find — including lumber from shipwrecks — and a seaside colony was born.

Now the 46 cottages are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and 29 of them have been restored. The restoration of the final 17 cottages on North Beach is underway, along with a 650-foot-long boardwalk.

I’ll always remember our first stay in 2018. I indulged by just sitting on a beach chair on the sand and watching Cora, then a toddler, dance on the shore, chasing the seagulls, which she couldn’t quite pronounce.

“Hey sea souls. Come here sea souls,” she yelled out between bursts of laughter.

The best part was we could just walk up to our room when she petered out and I could promise we could return shortly. No having to deal with sandy little feet before getting back in the car. No having to deal with a cranky kiddo on the car ride home to Santa Ana. She could just nap in our room.

Maybe it was the somewhat quirky and historical beach decor? Or perhaps it was the fact that all I had to do was walk a few steps and I was on the sand? Or that the waves crashing on the sand lulled me to sleep that night? All I know, is that I’ve been hooked on scoring a cottage ever since.

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