Appliance Repair in Oakdale, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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Schedule your service call

We work with your busy schedule to get you the service you need.

Technician Diagnoses
Technician Diagnoses

Your factory-trained technician will travel to your location and diagnose your appliance problem.

Quote & Repair
Quote & Repair

We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Oakdale, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Oakdale, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
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  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Oakdale, CA

California Sends 14.3 Million COVID-19 Tests To Schools

Over the past month, with roughly 7.2 million students and staff heading into and returning from spring break, the state has distributed more than 14.3 million COVID-19 at-home tests to schools for students and staff. In partnership with local county offices of education, the state has allocated tests based on the total number of students and staff – in both public and private schools – in each county.A critical part of Governor Newsom’s SMARTER Plan, the state has maintained the operational readiness and resource st...

Over the past month, with roughly 7.2 million students and staff heading into and returning from spring break, the state has distributed more than 14.3 million COVID-19 at-home tests to schools for students and staff. In partnership with local county offices of education, the state has allocated tests based on the total number of students and staff – in both public and private schools – in each county.

A critical part of Governor Newsom’s SMARTER Plan, the state has maintained the operational readiness and resource stockpiles to quickly distribute tests to help minimize the spread of COVID-19.

“California is focused on keeping schools open and students safe, and we’re not letting our guard down,” said Governor Newsom. “We know that COVID-19 is still present in our communities, but the SMARTER Plan is how we keep people safe and continue moving the state forward.”

In addition to these tests, the state has made personal protective equipment (PPE) available for any school that needs it – already having distributed over 40.6 million KN95s, N95s, and surgical masks to schools since the return from winter break. Throughout the pandemic, the state distributed over 1 billion PPE units to schools, including items such as masks, gloves, hand sanitizers, and more.

California has become a national leader in preventing school closures and keeping students in the classroom. As the New York Times highlighted in mid-October, California did “remarkably well limiting outbreaks,” accounting for 1 percent of the nation’s school closures despite educating 12 percent of the nation’s students. By the start of winter break, the state improved that rate to 0.3 percent of the nation’s school closures.

To help facilitate the deployment and administration of these tests, the California Department of Public Health has distributed materials to schools to further highlight this testing program, such as social media images and messaging.

The SMARTER Plan’s core pillars and preparedness metrics focus on lifesaving public health measures and strategies the state has successfully used to slow the spread and protect Californians. Recognizing that each variant brings with it unique characteristics relative to the specific conditions in neighborhoods and communities, the Plan preserves needed flexibility and ensures the state has the resources and capabilities in place to tackle the COVID-19 challenges that lie ahead. The SMARTER Plan maintains the state’s focus on targeted investments and outreach to tackle COVID-19 health disparities in disproportionately impacted communities. The Plan features a new COVID-19 Assessment and Action Unit to monitor data and frontline conditions in real-time. It also builds upon a robust, regionally-based wastewater surveillance and genome sequencing network to have early and rapid insights into the changing nature of the virus and early identification of variants.

Legislation Extends Statewide Eviction Protections

On the final day of Women’s History Month, Acting Governor Eleni Kounalakis signed legislation that extends eviction protections for Californians participating in rental assistance programs, making her the first woman in California’s history to sign a piece of legislation into law.“California’s nation-leading rent relief program has provided much needed relief for more than 220,000 households across the state. Today’s action will provide additional time to thousands more who are in the process of acquirin...

On the final day of Women’s History Month, Acting Governor Eleni Kounalakis signed legislation that extends eviction protections for Californians participating in rental assistance programs, making her the first woman in California’s history to sign a piece of legislation into law.

“California’s nation-leading rent relief program has provided much needed relief for more than 220,000 households across the state. Today’s action will provide additional time to thousands more who are in the process of acquiring emergency relief,” said Acting Governor Kounalakis on March 31. “I am deeply humbled to take this action and to be part of history today as the first woman in state history to sign legislation into law. I remain more determined than ever to ensure that while I may be the first to do so, I will certainly not be the last.”

AB 2179 by Assemblymember Tim Grayson (D-Concord) and Assemblymember Buffy Wicks (D-Oakland) extends eviction protections through June 30 to help ensure housing stability for eligible tenants who apply for assistance from state or local rental assistance programs.

“California is leading the nation’s economic recovery from the pandemic, and we’re committed to ensuring all of our communities can access the supports they need to get back on their feet,” said Governor Gavin Newsom. “Today’s action preserves important protections so that struggling families can keep a roof over their heads as the state works to provide critical assistance to thousands of households across California.”

Acting Governor Kounalakis was joined at the signing ceremony by Senate President pro Tempore Toni G. Atkins, Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon, Assemblymembers Grayson and Wicks, Senator Josh Becker, and Assemblymember Blanca Rubio.

California’s $5.5 billion COVID-19 Rent Relief program is the largest statewide renter assistance program in the country and covers 100 percent of past-due rent payments for qualified low-income Californians. The state program has to date assisted more than 220,000 low-income households, with thousands of additional households assisted by local rent relief programs. Under the state program, tenants can access rental funds directly if their landlord chooses not to participate, and landlords can receive compensation even if their otherwise income-qualified tenants have already vacated a unit. Additional program information is available at the Housing Is Key website.

Acting Governor Kounalakis also signed SB 504 by Senator Josh Becker (D-Menlo Park), which will allow military and overseas voters and voters with disabilities to complete a same day voter registration and cast a ballot. Additionally, it provides the Secretary of State more accurate voter rolls and streamlines the process for the state’s universal vote by mail system by removing a number of unnecessary provisions.

Legislation Seeks Access For Affordable Housing

Against the backdrop of California’s ongoing housing crisis, Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel (D - Woodland Hills) has introduced legislation to create an online database of affordable housing listings.The measure, Assembly Bill (AB) 1961, will speed the state’s policy efforts to improve access to affordable housing and allow low-income residents to broaden their housing search. Sponsored by Housing CA, the bill stems directly from the life experiences of people who currently live in affordable housing, many of whom have exper...

Against the backdrop of California’s ongoing housing crisis, Assemblymember Jesse Gabriel (D - Woodland Hills) has introduced legislation to create an online database of affordable housing listings.

The measure, Assembly Bill (AB) 1961, will speed the state’s policy efforts to improve access to affordable housing and allow low-income residents to broaden their housing search. Sponsored by Housing CA, the bill stems directly from the life experiences of people who currently live in affordable housing, many of whom have experienced great difficulty applying in person and often join upwards of 30 waitlists in their search for affordable housing.

An estimated 11 million families in the U.S. now pay more than half their income on rent, a number that has grown steadily as the supply of affordable housing shrinks. The result, according to advocates, is that some people are forced to choose between paying for rent or other necessities, such as food and medicine.

“Many families across California face significant barriers to finding affordable housing that meet their needs—it is long past time for us to have a simple, practical way to apply for affordable housing,” said Assemblyman. Gabriel. “This bill would make it easier for Californians to access the housing they need, allowing them to apply from a computer or phone.”

By helping low-income applicants and property managers in matching tenants, screening and replying to applications, and keeping updated listings of affordable housing units, AB 1961 would make the process of finding affordable housing exponentially simpler.

“Seniors, people with disabilities, and rural Californians would not have to spend the time and energy to trek across cities to turn in applications,” said Amber-Lee Leslie, Legislative Advocate for Housing CA. “People who speak English as a second language could fill out a translated online form from home instead of missing a day of work to show up in person at an affordable housing development.”

Jessie Grey, a Residents United Network member from San Diego and an Air Force veteran, remembered the process of applying for affordable housing: “It was resource- and time-intensive, and also disheartening,” he said. “Veterans have already been through enough.”

Retired Residents United Network member, Willie Stevens of Oakland, recalls taking three buses to unfamiliar neighborhoods to find affordable senior housing, trying to calculate when a manager might be available. He was couch-surfing at the time, and whenever he changed his address, he’d have to inform each building manager where had applied. An online portal like the one AB 1961 would create would have changed the experience entirely. “One application and I’d find a home,” he said.

AB 1961 is expected to be heard in committee in the coming weeks.

Drought Response Sees Conservation Efforts

Following the driest first three months of a year in the state’s recorded history, Governor Gavin Newsom this week took steps to drive water conservation at the local level, calling on local water suppliers to move to Level 2 of their Water Shortage Contingency Plans. Level 2 would require locally-appropriate actions that will conserve water across all sectors, and directs the State Water Resources Control Board to consider a ban on the watering of decorative grass at businesses and institutions.In an executive order signed rece...

Following the driest first three months of a year in the state’s recorded history, Governor Gavin Newsom this week took steps to drive water conservation at the local level, calling on local water suppliers to move to Level 2 of their Water Shortage Contingency Plans. Level 2 would require locally-appropriate actions that will conserve water across all sectors, and directs the State Water Resources Control Board to consider a ban on the watering of decorative grass at businesses and institutions.

In an executive order signed recently, the Governor ordered the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) to evaluate the adoption of regulations banning irrigation of “non-functional” turf (or grass), such as decorative grass adjacent to large industrial and commercial buildings. The ban would not include residential lawns or grass used for recreation, such as school fields, sports fields and parks. The Department of Water Resources estimates this ban alone will result in potential water savings of several hundred thousand acre-feet. An acre-foot of water serves the needs of approximately three households for a year.

“While we have made historic investments to protect our communities, economy and ecosystems from the worsening drought across the West, it is clear we need to do more,” said Governor Newsom. “I am calling on local water agencies to implement more aggressive water conservation measures, including having the Water Board evaluate a ban on watering ornamental grass on commercial properties, which will drive water use savings at this critical time. Amid climate-driven extremes in weather, we must all continue to do our part and make water conservation a way of life.”

As the drought persists into a third year and conditions worsen amidst dry, hot weather, the order called on the SWRCB to consider requiring urban water suppliers to activate, at a minimum, Level 2 of their customized Water Shortage Contingency Plans. These plans, required by state law, are developed by local water agencies to navigate drought and each plan is customized based on an agency’s unique infrastructure and management. Triggering Level 2 of these plans involves implementing water conservation actions to prepare for a water shortage level of up to 20 percent. For example, in many communities, this would mean reducing the number of days that residents can water outdoors, among other measures.

To further conserve water and strengthen drought resiliency in this critically dry year, the Governor is encouraging suppliers, where appropriate, to consider going above and beyond the Level 2 of their water shortage contingency plans, activating more ambitious measures. Governor Newsom has also ordered state agencies to submit funding proposals to support the state’s short- and long-term drought response, including emergency assistance to communities and households facing drought-related water shortages, facilitating groundwater recharge and wastewater recycling, improvements in water use efficiency, protecting fish and wildlife, and minimizing drought-related economic disruption.

The executive order includes several other provisions that will protect all water users:

· Ensuring Vulnerable Communities Have Drinking Water

· Cuts red tape so communities that need access to emergency hauled or bottled water can get it immediately

· Safeguarding Groundwater Supplies

· Requires local permitting authorities to coordinate with Groundwater Sustainability Agencies to ensure new proposed wells do not compromise existing wells or infrastructure, as 85 percent of public water systems rely heavily on groundwater during drought

· Streamlines permitting for groundwater recharge projects that help to refill aquifers when rains come

· Protecting Vulnerable Fish And Wildlife

· Expedites state agency approvals for necessary actions to protect fish and wildlife where drought conditions threaten their health and survival

· Preventing Illegal Water Diversions

· Directs the Water Board to expand site inspections in order to determine whether illegal diversions are occurring

The Governor’s California Comeback Plan invests $5.2 billion over three years to support the immediate drought response and build water resilience, including funding to secure and expand water supplies; bolster drought contingency planning and multi-benefit land repurposing projects; support drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, with a focus on small and disadvantaged communities; advance Sustainable Groundwater Management Act implementation to improve water supply security and quality; and support wildlife and habitat restoration efforts, among other nature-based solutions.

Earlier this month, Governor Newsom advanced an additional $22.5 million to bolster the state’s drought response. Of this funding, $8.25 million will be used to increase educational and outreach efforts, including through the Save Our Water campaign, which is providing Californians with water-saving tips via social media and other digital advertising.

The Governor’s California Blueprint proposal includes $750 million in additional drought funding, $250 million of which was set aside as a drought reserve to be allocated in the spring, based on conditions and need.

More information on the state’s response to the drought and informational resources available to the public are available at https://drought.ca.gov/.

Affordable Care Act Anniversary Month Lauds Programs, Progress

During March, residents observed the 12th anniversary of the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, the most significant improvement to America’s health care system since the passage of Medicaid and Medicare more than five decades ago. On this anniversary, Covered California celebrated the progress made since passage of this groundbreaking law and is reminding people that they may still be able to sign up for comprehensive coverage during the current special-enrollment period.“California celebrates the 12th anniversary of t...

During March, residents observed the 12th anniversary of the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, the most significant improvement to America’s health care system since the passage of Medicaid and Medicare more than five decades ago. On this anniversary, Covered California celebrated the progress made since passage of this groundbreaking law and is reminding people that they may still be able to sign up for comprehensive coverage during the current special-enrollment period.

“California celebrates the 12th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act with a record enrollment of 1.8 million people, record-low uninsured rates and a tremendous sense of pride that comes from providing affordable coverage and helping save lives during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Jessica Altman, executive director of Covered California. “The door may still be open to you if you need health insurance, because Californians can still sign up for comprehensive coverage through Covered California if they have a change in their life circumstances.”

As a result of California’s leadership to fully leverage the Affordable Care Act, Covered California has provided coverage for over 5 million Californians since first opening its doors in 2014.

Through the federal law’s expansion of Medicaid, millions more have enrolled through California’s Medi-Cal program. Taken together, California’s implementation of the Affordable Care Act has resulted in a drop in the state’s uninsured rate to a record-low 6 percent in 2020. Communities of color have been among the biggest beneficiaries of Affordable Care Act policies in California, with the uninsured rate for Latinos decreasing by 50 percent, and by nearly 66 percent for Black and Asian American/Pacific Islander consumers.

The federal American Rescue Plan built on the Affordable Care Act in significant ways, reducing consumer premiums costs to record lows and expanding eligibility for premium savings to middle-income individuals and families. As Covered California lauds the Affordable Care Act, the exchange also encourages Californians to take advantage of the financial help provided by the American Rescue Plan if they qualify for coverage during this year’s special-enrollment period.

Although Covered California’s open-enrollment period ended on Jan. 31, there are many life changes that allow Californians to enroll right now. The most common qualifying life events are losing health coverage, getting married, having a baby, permanently moving to California or moving within California.

In addition, there are several qualifying life events that are available due to the public health emergency and the American Rescue Plan:

You or a family member have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

You have a household income under 150 percent of the federal poverty level, which is less than $19,320 for an individual and $39,750 for a family of four.

Eligible consumers in this income bracket would qualify for a Silver 94 plan, the best coverage available through Covered California, at no cost.

You paid the penalty because you did not have health insurance.

“Today, two of every three Covered California enrollees can get name-brand coverage for $10 a month or less, thanks to the expanded eligibility and record financial help through the American Rescue Plan,” Altman said. “For millions of people, these American Rescue Plan subsidies are critical to preserving the gains we have made so far and to keeping Californians and Americans covered and cared for well into the future.”

Consumers who sign up during special enrollment will have their coverage begin on the first of the following month.

Consumers can explore their options in a number of different ways, including:

Covered California’s online Shop and Compare Tool will show a consumer if they are eligible for financial help and which plans are available in their area.

Find the nearest certified enroller in your neighborhood by visiting https://www.coveredca.com/support/contact-us/.

Call Covered California at (800) 300-1506 to get information or enroll by phone.

Covered California’s online enrollment portal and certified enrollers will also help people find out whether they are eligible for Medi-Cal. Medi-Cal enrollment is available year-round, and the coverage will begin the day after a person signs up.

Covered California is the state’s health insurance marketplace, where Californians can find affordable, high-quality insurance from top insurance companies. Covered California is the only place where individuals who qualify can get financial assistance on to reduce premium costs. Consumers can then compare health insurance plans and choose the coverage that works best for their health needs and budget. Depending on their income, some consumers may qualify for the low-cost or no-cost Medi-Cal program.

Covered California is an independent part of the state government whose job is to make the health insurance marketplace work for California’s consumers. It is overseen by a five-member board appointed by the governor and the Legislature. For more information about Covered California, visit www.CoveredCA.com.

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