Appliance Repair in Newman, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Newman, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Newman, CA

Alumna Katherine S. Newman appointed as provost of the University of California system

The University of California Board of Regents today (Oct. 18) approved Katherine S. Newman, a nationally renowned academic leader and scholar, as UC Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.Newman is currently the System Chancellor for Academic Programs and the Senior Vice President for Economic Development in the Office of the President of the University of Massachusetts. She also holds the Torrey Little Chair of Sociology at UMass Amherst where she previously served as Provost.Effective Jan. ...

The University of California Board of Regents today (Oct. 18) approved Katherine S. Newman, a nationally renowned academic leader and scholar, as UC Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs.

Newman is currently the System Chancellor for Academic Programs and the Senior Vice President for Economic Development in the Office of the President of the University of Massachusetts. She also holds the Torrey Little Chair of Sociology at UMass Amherst where she previously served as Provost.

Effective Jan. 9, 2023, Newman will serve as the University of California’s chief academic officer and help lead the University’s efforts to advance academic opportunity and inclusive excellence across the 10-campus system. She replaces veteran professor and administrator Michael T. Brown, who is stepping down at the end of 2022 after serving five years in the role.

University of California President Michael V. Drake, M.D., selected Newman following an extensive nationwide search that included consultation with a UC-wide advisory committee with representation from faculty, students, staff and senior leaders.

“I’m deeply grateful to Provost Brown for the many significant contributions he has made to the University over these past five years. With his leadership on the 2030 goals, UC has charted a bold path for the years ahead,” President Drake said. “Dr. Newman is an excellent choice for helping us realize the vision of those goals. She is a talented academic leader who cares deeply about public higher education and the vital role it plays in helping communities thrive. I look forward to working with her to advance our shared academic priorities, including the important work underway to close equity gaps across the University of California and to diversify our professoriate.”

A California native, Newman has deep UC roots. She earned a B.A. degree in Philosophy and Sociology from UC San Diego, then went on to earn a Ph.D. in Anthropology at UC Berkeley. She began her teaching career at Berkeley Law in the then newly-formed Ph.D. program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy.

She has since held numerous academic leadership positions, while continuing to teach and publish scholarly works in her field.

“It is the honor of a lifetime to return to the University of California, my alma mater twice over as an undergraduate and a graduate student. I lost count at 9 in totaling up the number of people, across three generations of my family, who have completed their degrees within the UC system. Its excellence in all spheres — from its remarkable faculty to its extraordinary students — is recognized the world over. I am excited to join President Drake and thank the Regents for this welcome.”

Susan Cochran, Chair of the Academic Senate, said that she believes Newman is the right person for the position.

“I’m pleased that UC will have someone of Dr. Newman’s caliber in the role of Provost during such a critical time for California and its leading research university,” Cochran said. “Provost Michael Brown has done so much to advance student opportunity and equity at the University of California, and I’m confident that Dr. Newman will be equally passionate about continuing that important work.”

Richard Leib, Chair of the Board of Regents, also praised Newman’s selection, noting that she has a long track record of success both as a scholar and an academic administrator.

“Dr. Newman has devoted her professional life to academia because she understands its significant value,” Leib said. “Higher education is transformative for individuals and for our communities as a whole. Dr. Newman recognizes that and is committed to helping more students come to UC and thrive. I look forward to working with her to lead UC’s efforts in innovation and entrepreneurship as I know that she is the right person to truly make strides in this area. She will help us in advancing the important work of the University of California.”

Among her many accomplishments, Newman worked as the James Knapp Dean of the Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins, the Director of the Institute of International and Regional Studies at Princeton, and was the founding Dean of Social Science at the Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study at Harvard. She was the Forbes Class of 1941 Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton and the director of Harvard’s Multidisciplinary Program on Inequality and Social Policy, where she served as the Malcolm Weiner Professor of Urban Studies in the Kennedy School of Government.

“Katherine has served the University of Massachusetts at both the campus and system levels with distinction in many different leadership capacities, always focused on leveraging the power of public higher education to drive the upward socio-economic trajectory of individuals and communities,” UMass President Marty Meehan said of Newman’s tenure. “We wish Katherine all the best with her new adventure.”

An elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Newman is also the author of 15 books on topics ranging from a sociological study of the working poor in America’s urban centers to middle-class economic insecurity under the brunt of recession.

Her forthcoming book, “Moving the Needle: What Tight Labor Markets Do for the Poor” (co-authored with Elisabeth Jacobs at the Urban Institute), will be published by the University of California Press in April 2023.

The Regents’ item on her appointment may be accessed here.

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San Francisco High School football: Lincoln wins 10th straight Bell Game over Washington

SAN FRANCISCO — There might not be a more scenic high school football vantage point in America.Washington High School Stadium, overlooking San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge, is breathtaking from about every angle.On Friday, in the 77th Big Bell Game, the host Eagles were hoping to end a nine-year drought against arch-rival Lincoln. With a surprising 7-1 overall record and 4-0 in Academic Athletic Association play coming in, Washington’s hopes didn’t appear fleeting.But after a familiar 49-...

SAN FRANCISCO — There might not be a more scenic high school football vantage point in America.

Washington High School Stadium, overlooking San Francisco’s iconic Golden Gate Bridge, is breathtaking from about every angle.

On Friday, in the 77th Big Bell Game, the host Eagles were hoping to end a nine-year drought against arch-rival Lincoln. With a surprising 7-1 overall record and 4-0 in Academic Athletic Association play coming in, Washington’s hopes didn’t appear fleeting.

But after a familiar 49-0 Mustangs’ hammering, Lincoln coach Phil Ferrigno had to catch his breath. Even he wasn’t expecting such a dominating, lopsided win.

The Mustangs improved to 6-3 and all but clinched another AAA regular-season title at 5-0.

According to reports from The San Francisco Standard, Lincoln’s defense forced six turnovers and turned them into 30 points, including pick 6s from Jamelle Newman and Jaylen Lopez, who also returned a fumble for a score.

Newman scored two touchdowns on offense, including a 52-yard TD jaunt to start the scoring.

“I gotta admit, I didn’t see this one coming like this,” said Ferrigno, who has led the Mustangs to eight section and two state titles since 2005. “I was really impressed with our defense and intensity.

“Our line played great. I’m so proud of those guys. We played efficiently. You never know in a big game like this how kids will perform. We were way more focused than I imagined.”

The story coming into the game was Washington, which hasn’t had a winning season since 2011. A dominant program the previous two decades, the Eagles fell on hard times, winning just 16 times against 73 losses from 2012 through 2021.

But fourth-year head coach Mike Ramos, who was the starting center on the 1999 San Francisco Section Washington team, had the Eagle completely turned around until Friday.

The Eagles came in having outscored opponents 314-85 with three shutouts, including last week’s 22-0 thumping of defending state 7-A champion Balboa.

Washington opened with a 49-14 romp over Ygnacio Valley-Concord and followed with lopsided wins over Cenair (41-0), Galileo (44-8) and Burton (64-0). The team’s only previous defeat was 23-22 to Irvington-Fremont.

“It’s really all about the players,” Ramos said on Wednesday. “They bought into what we’re trying to do. They’ve done everything we’ve asked.”

But playing without starting quarterback James Mertz (knee injury) the Eagles unraveled early. After Newman’s touchdown, a punt snap wasn’t handled, Latu Manumua fell on it for a TD, making it 14-0.

Lincoln got a big lift from its top player Ricky Underwood, making his first appearance since breaking a collarbone in the team’s opener. Underwood had a couple long runs and played a little defense.

“He got a little run in and it was great for us,” Ferrigno said.

A Vincent Huang pressure forced a fumble in the end zone and Lopez recovered, making it 21-0. By halftime it was 35-0 after a Newman pick 6. Following Lopez’ second defensive touchdown, Renay Taylor added a touchdown run in the fourth quarter for the final tally.

“This was a good one,” Ferrigno said. “We’ll take it. Still a long way to go.”

Lincoln extended its lead in the series to 41-35-1. The Mustangs plays at Burton next week, while Washington hosts Mission. The Eagles have already clinched a home playoff game.

Look for more stunning photos from Eric Taylor later

QB relationship proving pivotal to Ticats success

OTTAWA — All three of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats quarterbacks made their way into the team’s season finale against the Ottawa REDBLACKS in the nation’s capital on Saturday night.Matt Shiltz made the start and threw for 144 yards. Dane Evans backed him up with seven completions for 117 yards and Jamie Newman executed a pair of quarterback sneaks for two touchdowns in their 23-16 victory.Shiltz pointed out in a post-game interview with TSN just important the relationship between himself and Evans is to the team&rsq...

OTTAWA — All three of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats quarterbacks made their way into the team’s season finale against the Ottawa REDBLACKS in the nation’s capital on Saturday night.

Matt Shiltz made the start and threw for 144 yards. Dane Evans backed him up with seven completions for 117 yards and Jamie Newman executed a pair of quarterback sneaks for two touchdowns in their 23-16 victory.

Shiltz pointed out in a post-game interview with TSN just important the relationship between himself and Evans is to the team’s success.

“I think it’s great for the team,” Shiltz said. “Dane’s a great guy and our relationship has been awesome. We always talk about staying ready. In the CFL it takes two quarterbacks. It really comes back to everyone being ready, it doesn’t really matter what position it is.”

Now, their attention turns to the Eastern Semi-Final next Sunday in Montreal.

“It’s going to be great,” Shiltz said. “We know who we’re facing and it’s a big game, it’s the playoffs. We’re going to get ready this week.”

RELATED » Box Score: Tiger-Cats, REDBLACKS by the numbers » Through the Lens: Hamilton at Ottawa » Watch: Impressive drive and TD extends Hamilton’s lead » Ticats defeat REDBLACKS on the road to finish out regular season

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Ticats head coach Orlando Steinauer was pleased with the way his team performed given it would have been easy to look ahead to their tilt with the Alouettes.

“We looked different out there but I was proud of the way we persevered and played hard,” Steinauer told the Ticats Audio Network. “Everything is a learning experience. Everybody prepared really hard and everyone contributed to this win.

The Ticats now prepare to head to Montreal for the Eastern Semi-Final. The winner of that game will then head to Toronto for the Eastern Final on Nov. 13.

Hamilton defeated Toronto in the 2021 Eastern Final before dropping the Grey Cup at home to the Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

Mark Zuckerberg will testify in the FTC’s antitrust case against Meta

The Federal Trade Commission will call on Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg to testify in its upcoming case against the company. The FTC sued the social media giant in July in an attempt to block it from ...

The Federal Trade Commission will call on Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg to testify in its upcoming case against the company. The FTC sued the social media giant in July in an attempt to block it from buying Within Unlimited, the creator of the popular VR workout app Supernatural.

Reuters reports that the agency listed 18 witnesses, including Zuckerberg and Meta CTO Andrew Bosworth, in a court document filed with California’s Northern District Court on Friday. In addition to answering questions about the potential acquisition, the FTC plans to ask Zuckerberg about Meta’s VR strategy and how the company intends to support third-party developers, according to court documents seen by Reuters.

In July, the FTC accused the company and Zuckerberg of attempting to “illegally acquire” Within. “Instead of competing on the merits, Meta is trying to buy its way to the top,” John Newman, deputy director of the FTC’s Bureau of Competition, said at the time.

Meta has dismissed the FTC’s lawsuit, claiming it is based on “idealogy and speculation, not evidence.” The case could be another costly setback for a company struggling to convince the public and Wall Street of its vision for the future. Earlier this week, Meta disclosed in its latest earnings report that its Reality Labs VR and AR division is losing more money than ever. In Q3 2022, the unit lost $3.7 billion. That’s a trend David Wehner, the company’s outgoing chief financial officer, told investors would continue through 2023.

Record low voter turnout draws concern in London, Ont.

It appears the vast majority of Londoners could not be bothered to vote in Monday’s municipal election after the city recorded a new low for voter turnout.Initial estimates from the City of London’s website pegs voter turnout at roughly 25 p...

It appears the vast majority of Londoners could not be bothered to vote in Monday’s municipal election after the city recorded a new low for voter turnout.

Initial estimates from the City of London’s website pegs voter turnout at roughly 25 per cent. The last municipal election, in 2018, drew a voter turnout of 39 per cent, while 2014 drew 43 per cent.

Beyond who won and who lost, for Jacquie Newman, a political scientist at King’s University College, voter turnout is the real story of London’s 2022 election.

“It would appear that a lot of Londoners didn’t feel that they had a particular stake in this campaign and showed that by not showing up at the polls,” Newman said.

Newman says this year’s campaign lacked a galvanizing issue to get voters to the polls, such as bus rapid transit in 2018 and concerns about the Fontana 8, a voting bloc centred around former Mayor Joe Fontana, in the election prior.

“Unfortunately, homelessness and housing affordability didn’t really provide that, and it didn’t help also that the candidates didn’t really frame themselves as being widely divergent on those issues,” Newman said.

“It really does end up being people looking at this and going kind of, ‘meh.'”

Mayor-elect Josh Morgan says he expected to see a lower voter turnout than previous elections after similar showings during recent provincial and federal races, adding that “municipal’s always the lowest of the three.”

Morgan says the low turnout leaves him and his council colleagues with “important work to do.”

“To reach out to Londoners across the city, to involve them in the decision-making of our council, to ensure that we do a lot of outreach when we bring forward major new policies and initiatives to align those with the priorities of Londoners,” Morgan added.

“The people who participated in the election are the ones who did, but all Londoners deserve a voice and a say at this next city council.”

Early numbers from the Association of Municipalities of Ontario show 36 per cent turnout across the 301 of 444 municipalities that held local elections Monday.

Voter turnout in Ontario’s 2018 municipal elections was 38.3 per cent provincially, the lowest among municipal election turnouts recorded since 1982.

— with files from The Canadian Press

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