Appliance Repair in Mendota, CA

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Mendota, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

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Latest News in Mendota, CA

Assistant principal at Mendota High to become principal in 2023

“This community is my home, I’m very proud of it. I hope they’ll know I’ll be here to do whatever I can do to help their kids be successful.”Joe Masini, the assistant principal for the last 16 years, soon will be taking on the role of principal at Mendota High School beginning in the 2023 school year.Masini has been with Mendota High School for all 29 years of his professional career. He g...

“This community is my home, I’m very proud of it. I hope they’ll know I’ll be here to do whatever I can do to help their kids be successful.”

Joe Masini, the assistant principal for the last 16 years, soon will be taking on the role of principal at Mendota High School beginning in the 2023 school year.

Masini has been with Mendota High School for all 29 years of his professional career. He graduated from Western Illinois University with a degree in industrial education and a minor in history. In 1994, he was hired at Mendota to teach industrial arts classes including drafting, electronics, woods and metals. The following year he began teaching history. During his 12 years as a teacher, he also coached football, baseball and boys and girls basketball.

In 2003, the principal of Mendota at the time suggested Masini get his masters degree and he went back to Western and got a masters in educational administration and leadership. In 2006 there was an opening for assistant principal, and Masini’s been in that role ever since.

Masini said he’s never had any specific ambitions to become a principal and wouldn’t have considered the role anywhere but Mendota. But, with the principal position open, it was a natural transition because Principal Denise Aughenbaugh is leaving to take on the role of superintendent when Jeff Prusator, the current superintendent, retires.

Now, Masini is looking forward to taking on the new role and all it’s responsibilities to close out his career. The role requires less focus on attendance and disciplinary procedures and more work with the staff and day-to-day operations of running the school. Masini said he wants to continue to create a fun work environment while getting things done.

“I want [the teachers and staff] to look forward to coming to work everyday and I hope I can create an environment in which they’ll be able to do that,” Masini said.

Masini’s main focus will be student driven, always doing what’s best for children. Over the years, Masini said he’s learned from Aughenbaugh and Prusator that every decision made has to have the consideration of how it’ll affect the students.

Aughenbaugh said Masini has a strong work ethic, is respected by the staff and always puts students first.

“It’s important we recognize that someone where he is in his career is taking on new challenges,” Aughenbaugh said. “It says a lot about his character that he’s willing to learn new things this late in his career for the betterment of the school and its students.”

The goal is for Masini’s transition to principal be as smooth as possible. He will use the next 10 months to work with Aughenbaugh and learn as much about the role as he can.

Masini’s two children also went through the Mendota school system. Masini’s wife is an English teacher at the high school and also has worked at Mendota her entire professional career. The two met in undergraduate school at Western.

Masini said both he and his wife have had opportunities they could’ve pursued elsewhere throughout the years. For example, after he earned his masters, Masini said his hometown of Rock Falls offered him a job almost the same day as Mendota. But, he decided to stay, because both his wife and kids were involved in the district and the whole family loves the community.

“This community is my home, I’m very proud of it,” Masini said. “I hope they’ll know I’ll be here to do whatever I can do to help their kids be successful.”

Masini will be principal effective July 1, 2023.

California’s drought has caused entire towns to sink nearly a foot in just one year. This map shows where

The ground is sinking in parts of California as the continued drought strains reservoirs, increasing reliance on the state’s already precarious groundwater reserves depleted by years of well-pumping.In just one year, from October 2020 to September 2021, satellite-based estimates showed entire towns in the Central Valley, including in Kings and Tulare counties, sinking by nearly a foot. The maximum loss recorded during that time was 1.1 feet on the northw...

The ground is sinking in parts of California as the continued drought strains reservoirs, increasing reliance on the state’s already precarious groundwater reserves depleted by years of well-pumping.

In just one year, from October 2020 to September 2021, satellite-based estimates showed entire towns in the Central Valley, including in Kings and Tulare counties, sinking by nearly a foot. The maximum loss recorded during that time was 1.1 feet on the northwestern edge of Tulare County.

“It’s a latent issue that’s been building over a long time, and we’re kind of seeing a lot of fallout from that,” said Andrew Ayres, an environmental resources and economics researcher at the Public Policy Institute of California, a nonpartisan think tank.

Land subsidence threatens infrastructure, including roads and canals, he said. Damage from it led to a $3.3 million repair project at the Delta Mendota canal in San Joaquin Valley, which delivers water to 1.2 million acres of farmland and 2 million people in the region. The repair project, the funding for which was announced in April, is part of a larger effort by the state water department to address deficiencies in California’s water conveyance systems.

“As we pump groundwater out of the aquifer, the water exists in these spaces between various layers and pieces of rock,” Ayres said. “If you pump out enough water, those places will get compressed and this leads to a loss in long-term storage.”

Even if an aquifer is recharged with rain or by other means, it won’t be able to hold as much water as it used to, Ayres added. As aquifer levels drop, the process of pulling water from them becomes more difficult and costly.

“It might be impossible to access any remaining groundwater supplies,” Ayres added.

The problem existed long before major infrastructure and sustainability requirements were put in place. The U.S. Geological Survey says that between the 1920s and 1970s, significant land subsidence occurred in about half of the San Joaquin Valley, or about 5,200 square miles, with some areas subsiding by as much as 28 feet.

The continued depletion of groundwater reserves, especially in drought years, is worrisome because of groundwater’s critical role as a buffer when there’s little rain or snowpack to replenish the state’s many surface water resources, like reservoirs.

“In drought years, (groundwater) can make up to 60% of the state’s water supply,” said Steven Springhorn, a supervising engineering geologist for the water department. That compares with about 40% in non-drought years.

When major surface water sources, such as the State Water Project, can’t deliver enough water during drought, local agencies must find alternative sources, like pumping it from the ground or purchasing it. The State Water Project is a massive system of dams and canals (similar to the Central Valley Project). It delivers water to about 27 million people, including farmers and city dwellers.

The State Water Project announced it expects to provide just 5% of the water requested by contractors in the coming year.

“This year, we don’t have any surface water to provide to our growers,” said Kristin Sicke, general manager of the Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, which provides irrigation water to farmers in western Yolo County, as well as delivering water to dozens of smaller municipal and industrial customers.

But the groundwater situation is also dire. Sicke said the district is anticipating record-low groundwater levels this year — beyond the historical low point set during the 1976-77 drought, she said.

Many wells, not just in western Yolo County but across the state, are reporting similarly grim groundwater levels. As of early May, more than 60% of wells in California that reported data within the past year indicated below- normal levels of water, data shows.

“This is a problem, especially for rural communities that tend not to have very deep wells,” said Ayres, of the policy research group. “It’s also a problem for ag users who, you know, maybe drilled a well 15 years ago when groundwater tables were a lot higher than they are today.”

There was heavier reliance on pumping in the past before key sustainability measures, such as the state’s Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2015, created tighter regulations around groundwater, he said. Much of the most persistent overdraft happened then, and the long-term consequences will continue to play out.

In recent years, many farmers have been choosing to fallow ground without planting instead of resorting to pumping from wells, he said. “In part, that’s because they kind of see the writing on the wall and are acting to control the negative impacts on the groundwater aquifer. In other cases, it’s because groundwater sustainability agencies have already adopted a constraint on how much groundwater people can pump, so they don’t have an option.”

Without water, crops can’t grow, said Ryan Jacobsen, CEO of the Fresno County Farm Bureau. The uncertainty of future conditions will make securing water supply more challenging. “Not knowing if this is year three of three or year three of 10 makes it more difficult for preparation purposes.”

Farmers, too, are seeking sustainable solutions, including investing in sophisticated technology for efficiency. “There’s definitely been a very large push to utilize every drop possible.”

The scarcity of water underscores the importance of monitoring groundwater, said Springhorn of the water department. Rigorous monitoring helps inform drought response and advanced planning as water agencies and agricultural communities navigate drought. Among the efforts to protect groundwater reserves include improved monitoring of groundwater systems, Springhorn said.

Sicke, the water manager in Yolo County, said her agency may need to reconsider its revenue structure, which currently relies more on surface water availability, should these prolonged drought conditions turn out to be the “new normal” for the state.

But for now, Sicke said she remains hopeful for a natural recovery. “We have seen the recovery historically when rain has come. We’re trying not to forget. Right now, it’s hard.”

Interior sets $210m for Western drought resilience

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding includes $137 million for storage and conveyance projects in California's Central Valley.The U.S..Interior Department has announced $210 million in funding from the recently enacted infrastructure bill for Western water storage and conveyance, including $137 million for projects in California's Central Valley.The projects are expected to develop over 1.7 million acre-feet of additional water storage capacity, enough water to support 6.8 million people for a year, the agency noted in a ...

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding includes $137 million for storage and conveyance projects in California's Central Valley.

The U.S..Interior Department has announced $210 million in funding from the recently enacted infrastructure bill for Western water storage and conveyance, including $137 million for projects in California's Central Valley.

The projects are expected to develop over 1.7 million acre-feet of additional water storage capacity, enough water to support 6.8 million people for a year, the agency noted in a release. The funding will also invest in two feasibility studies that could advance water storage capacity further once completed.

“In the wake of severe drought across the West, the Department is putting funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to work to expand access to clean, reliable water and mitigate the impacts of this crisis,” Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said. “Water is essential to every community – for feeding families, growing crops, powering agricultural businesses, and sustaining wildlife and our environment. Through the investments we are announcing today, we will advance water storage and conveyance supporting local water management agencies, farmers, families and wildlife.”

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law allocates $8.3 billion for Bureau of Reclamation water infrastructure projects over the next five years to advance drought resilience and expand access to clean water for families, farmers, and wildlife.

The funding will repair aging water delivery systems, secure dams, and complete rural water projects, and protect aquatic ecosystems, according to Interior. The money announced Oct. 17 is part of the $1.05 billion in Water Storage, Groundwater Storage and Conveyance Projects provided by the legislation.

“Our investment in these projects will increase water storage capacity and lay conveyance pipeline to deliver reliable and safe drinking water and build resiliency for communities most impacted by drought," Reclamation Commissioner Camille Calimlim Touton said.

Western projects

The selected projects are:

Verde River Sediment Mitigation Study: $5 million to provide the federal cost share for conducting the Verde River Sedimentation feasibility study, which would identify alternatives to restore at least 46,000 acre-feet of water storage lost in Arizona due to accumulation of sediment at Horseshoe Reservoir. It would also determine a plan for future management of sediment at Horseshoe and Bartlett Reservoirs and investigate potential operational flexibilities created with increased storage capacity to assist in mitigating impacts of drought and climate change on water availability. An appraisal study was completed in 2021.

B.F. Sisk Dam Raise and Reservoir Expansion Project: $25 million to the San Luis and Delta-Mendota Authority, to pursue the B.F. Sisk Dam Raise and Reservoir Expansion Project in California. The project is associated with the B.F. Sisk Safety of Dams Modification Project. Once complete, the project will develop approximately 130,000 acre-feet of additional storage.

Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Phase II: $82 million to efficiently integrate approximately 115,000 acre-feet of additional storage through new conveyance facilities with existing facilities to allow Delta water supplies to be safely diverted, stored and delivered to beneficiaries.

North of Delta Off Stream Storage (Sites Reservoir Project): $30 million to pursue off stream storage capable for up to 1.5 million acre-feet of water in the Sacramento River system located in the Coast range mountains west of Maxwell, Calif. The reservoir would utilize new and existing facilities to move water into and out of the reservoir, with ultimate release to the Sacramento River system via existing canals, a new pipeline near Dunnigan, Calif., and the Colusa Basin Drain.

Arkansas Valley Conduit: $60 million to continue the facilitation of supplying a safe, long-term water supply to an estimated 50,000 people in 40 rural communities along the Arkansas River in Colorado. Once complete the project will replace current groundwater sources contaminated with radionuclides and help communities comply with Environmental Protection Act drinking water regulations through more than 230 miles of pipelines designed to deliver up to about 7,500 acre-feet per year from Pueblo Reservoir.

Dry Redwater Regional Water System Feasibility Study: $3 million to provide the authorized federal cost-share for finishing the Dry Redwater Regional Water System Feasibility Study in Montana.

Cle Elum Pool Raise: $5 million to increase the Washington reservoir’s capacity an additional 14,600 acre-feet to be managed for instream flows for fish. Additional efforts include shoreline protection that will provide mitigation for the pool raise.

Colorado River

The department also recently announced new steps for drought mitigation in the Colorado River Basin supported by the Inflation Reduction Act, releasing a request for proposals for water system conservation measures as part of the newly created Lower Colorado River Basin System Conservation and Efficiency Program.

The bill provides $4 billion in funding for water management and conservation in the Colorado River Basin, including at least $500 million for projects in the Upper Basin states that will result in water conservation throughout the system.

Rep. Jim Costa, D-Calif., said the expenditures in California are "desperately needed" as farmers cope with impacts from the drought.

"These projects will make a difference by developing additional water storage and expanding access to water for families, farmers, and the environment," Costa said in a statement emailed to media. "This investment, along with the ongoing Friant Kern-Canal construction already underway, shows that we can and will improve our water system to better sustain future droughts due to climate change."

Sources: U.S. Department of the Interior, office of Rep. Jim Costa

Twin Cities chef feeds Strip Club nostalgia at Mendota pop-up

Chef JD Fratzke is stoking a little restaurant nostalgia with a limited-time menu at the Mudd Room, a speakeasy bar within a restaurant in Mendota.A selection of dishes that hark back to the ...

Chef JD Fratzke is stoking a little restaurant nostalgia with a limited-time menu at the Mudd Room, a speakeasy bar within a restaurant in Mendota.

A selection of dishes that hark back to the Strip Club Meat & Fish, Fratzke's lamented St. Paul restaurant that closed in 2017, will be served from June 2 through July 2. Fans of the seminal Dayton's Bluff spot will undoubtedly remember the beans and toast, cannellini beans on toasted focaccia with fried sage, parsley leaves and a little lemon olive oil ($7); or the crispy, pickled and fried giardiniera ($8). Other returning dishes include duck tataki, spiced seared duck breast dressed with red chile and ginger ponzu and finished with fresh radish sprouts and orange zest ($13). Fratzke will create a handful of other dishes and cocktails, which will complement the Mudd Room's regular menu.

"You know I'm not normally one for nostalgia," said Fratzke. "I had a whole other menu in mind, but when I walked into the Mudd Room, the stone walls — even the color scheme, I said, 'I know this. I know how to do this.' " He said the room demanded a little "Strip Club love," a restaurant that also featured stone walls.

The Mudd Room (1352 Hwy. 13, Mendota) is run by chefs and restaurateurs Tyge Nelson and Steve Hesse. The duo is currently bringing in chef friends — upcoming turns will include Tim McKee, Lenny Russo, JD Sutherland and Sameh Wadi — to run limited-time menus to augment those already served at the bar.

Erik Anderson, the nationally lauded chef, has received all kinds of recognition for his work at San Francisco's Coi, Nashville's the Catbird Seat, Barndiva in California's Sonoma County and more. But before the Michelin stars, Anderson rose to prominence in Minneapolis running the kitchens at Sea Change and Grand Cafe with Jamie Malone.

Now he's coming back to town to throw an exclusive drink and dining party with the team at Mr. Paul's Balloon Emporium, the whimsical cocktail experience overseen by legendary drink shaker Nick Kosevich, on June 17 and 18, with seatings at 5:30 and 8 p.m. Cost is $250 and includes a 10-course food and beverage pairing, tax and gratuity. Get tickets online at mrpaulssupperclub.com.

If that kind of fun is too rich, there's also a new weekend brunch service at Mr. Paul's Supperclub, where chef Tommy Begnaud will bring his bayou-influenced cuisine to the omelet set.

Renovations of the former Crowne Plaza in downtown Minneapolis will include Star Bar & Bistro by restaurateur Kim Bartmann.

The restaurant is expected to open by year's end inside the new boutique hotel Hotel Indigo by IGH (618 2nd Av. S., Mpls.). It will be an all-day American eatery with French influences and a focus on local purveyors, serving breakfast through dinner.

Bartmann's restaurant group is known for opening funky, neighborhood-specific restaurants such as Tiny Diner, Pat's Tap, Barbette, Book Club, Red Stag Supperclub, Gigi's and the Bread & Pickle concession stand by Lake Harriet.

Burnsville Center could see an influx of new activity with a massive new Asian market and international food hall.

The aging retail center had announced in March its intention to lease the ground-level space occupied by Gordmans department store to the national Asian grocer Enson Market.

But additional plans are now in the works to add a slew of both national and local food options, pulling flavors from China, Japan, Vietnam, Korea and Brazil. On tap is another location for Bullvino's, the Brazilian steakhouse in Lowertown St. Paul, which would offer indoor and outdoor full-service dining; Mango Mango, with blended fruit drinks and desserts; Pho2, which serves Vietnamese food; Chatime, a Taiwanese teahouse chain; Tours Les Jours, a French-South Korean bakery; another Bonchon Korean fried chicken outlet; and local bánh mì sensation Lu's Sandwiches.

The proposed project would take over 60,000 square feet of mall space.

Correction: A previous version of this story had the incorrect city for the Mudd Room. It is located in Mendota.

Former Water District General Manager Indicted for $25 Million Water Theft and Tax Violations

FRESNO, Calif. — A federal grand jury returned a five-count indictment today against Dennis Falaschi, 75, of Aptos, California, charging him with conspiracy, theft of government property, and filing false tax returns, U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert announced.According to court documents, Falaschi was the general manager for a public water district in Fresno and Merced Counties near the communities of Dos Palos, Firebaugh, and Los Banos. He exploited a leak in the Delta-Mendota Canal and engineered a way to steal over $25 milli...

FRESNO, Calif. — A federal grand jury returned a five-count indictment today against Dennis Falaschi, 75, of Aptos, California, charging him with conspiracy, theft of government property, and filing false tax returns, U.S. Attorney Phillip A. Talbert announced.

According to court documents, Falaschi was the general manager for a public water district in Fresno and Merced Counties near the communities of Dos Palos, Firebaugh, and Los Banos. He exploited a leak in the Delta-Mendota Canal and engineered a way to steal over $25 million in federally owned water.

According to court documents, in 1992, Falaschi was informed that an old, abandoned drain turnout near milepost markers 94.57 and 94.58 on the Delta-Mendota Canal was leaking water from the Delta-Mendota Canal into a parallel canal that the water district controlled. The drain was connected to a standpipe on the bank of the Delta-Mendota Canal that used a gate and valve to redirect water from the Delta-Mendota Canal into the water district’s canal. The gate had been cemented closed years earlier. The cement had since cracked and water was coming through it.

Thereafter, Falaschi instructed an employee to install a new gate inside the standpipe so that the site could be opened and closed on demand. He later instructed the employee to install a lid with a lock on top of the standpipe and an approximate two-foot elbow pipe off the valve of the standpipe that angled down 90 degrees into the water district’s canal. The lid concealed the theft because it prevented people from seeing that the gate inside the standpipe was functional. The elbow pipe further concealed and expedited the theft because it enclosed the water flow from the Delta-Mendota Canal into the water district’s canal and was installed in such a way that it was generally submerged under the water.

Falaschi subsequently instructed employees to use the site to steal federal water from the Delta-Mendota Canal on multiple occasions until the site was discovered in April 2015. He used the proceeds of the theft to pay himself and others exorbitant salaries, fringe benefits, and personal expense reimbursements.

Additionally, Falaschi is charged with filing false tax returns in 2015 through 2017. According to court records, he failed to report over $900,000 in income to the Internal Revenue Service that he received from private water sales.

The case is the product of an investigation by the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Office of Inspector General, the IRS-Criminal Investigation, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph Barton is prosecuting the case.

If convicted of theft of government property, Falaschi faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a fine up to $250,000. If convicted of conspiracy, he faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a fine up to $250,000. If convicted of the tax charges, he faces a maximum penalty of three years in prison and a fine up to $250,000. Any sentence, however, would be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables. The charges are only allegations; the defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

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