Appliance Repair in Kingsburg, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Kingsburg, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Kingsburg, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Kingsburg, CA

Kingsburg Company Beckons Fruit Snack Buyers With ‘Hello, I’m Ugly’

With the passing of Senate Bill 1383, cities, residents, and big store retailers in California are brainstorming how to stop edible food from going to landfills.However, there are Valley organizations that have been coming up with innovative ways to reduce food waste for years.Among them: ...

With the passing of Senate Bill 1383, cities, residents, and big store retailers in California are brainstorming how to stop edible food from going to landfills.

However, there are Valley organizations that have been coming up with innovative ways to reduce food waste for years.

Among them: The Ugly Company in Kingsburg and the Central California Food Bank.

In addition, researchers from the University of California, Davis are part of a national project focused on solving the food waste challenge posed by farms.

“SB 1383 is really a transformative piece of legislation because it’s pushing such an incredible amount of (landfill) diversion away,” said Edward Spang, an associate professor of food and science and technology at UC Davis.

Eight years ago, Ben Moore, a fourth-generation farmer and founder of The Ugly Company, saw firsthand how much edible fruit was being wasted. His response? Reduce the waste with dried fruit snacks marketed with the motto, “Hello, I’m Ugly.”

After serving in the U.S. Army, he returned to Kingsburg to work on his family farm, and then slowly gravitated toward trucking. One of his duties was hauling so-called “ugly” fruit to disposal sites such as landfills, unplanted fields, dairies, and compost yards.

“I was driving a truck and helping haul some of those loads,” Moore said. “I started adding it up and we ourselves were dumping about eight million pounds of fruit a year,” said Moore.

Moore responded by pitching his ideas to farmers on how they could turn a lot of imperfect fruit into sustainable snacks.

Over the last four years, Moore has built up The Ugly Company and brand by partnering with at least 40 farms.

“There’s a point where if the farmer can’t sell the fruit, the packing sheds are not going to pack the fruit because it’s not going to be profitable,” said Moore. “At that point, the packing shed is either going to divert the fruit to be dumped out in a coal truck or something of that nature.”

Moore’s company steps in by drying and packaging the discards into 100% upcycled dried fruit.

In the first year, The Ugly Company produced more than 50,000 pounds of packaged peaches, white nectarines, kiwis, and apricots. Moore estimates that in 2022 the company will market more than 2 million pounds of packaged edibles.

According to Feeding America, 108 billion pounds of food is wasted in the United States annually.

“My ultimate long-term goal —the point of this company — is that no fruit is thrown out at farms, period,” said Moore. “There’s a lot of other great things people are doing as well. I think it takes a full community —a full amount of effort from businesses, consumers, retailers, and even the politicians — to really make that happen. It’s very achievable.”

You can find The Ugly Company’s dried fruit packages at REI and Whole Foods, or order packages online here.

Watch: How Local Imperfect Produce Winds on People’s Plates

Jacqueline Pack of the Central California Food Bank says the nonprofit has been working with retailers to recover edible for the last 10 years. (GV Wire/Albert Baker)

Jacqueline Pack, director of food acquisitions for the Central California Food Bank, says they have been receiving food from farms and grocers that otherwise would have gone to the landfill for the last 10 years.

“So one thing that we’re really lucky with is, national retailers have been donating for at least the past 10 years, if not longer,” said Pack. “So this (SB 1383) just allows them to donate a little bit more and then also get stores that may not have known that this was something that they could do.”

About 50% of what the food bank receives is produce that, in turn, is given to families in need, said Pack.

Pack says they have had an ongoing partnership with Fresno County but will looking to revisit their partnerships to better meet SB 1383’s goals.

To donate produce and other edible food, visit the Central California Food Bank , 4010 E Amendola Dr. Fresno, or donate online here.

Spang, the UC Davis assistant professor, is part of a $15 million, five-year research project sponsored by the U.S. National Science Foundation and American University to help figure out how to reduce food waste across the country.

“So we’re doing a bit of research upstream in the food supply chain, looking at losses on the farm and opportunities to recover surplus or cosmetically imperfect produce that sometimes doesn’t make it into the marketplace,” said Spang.

Spang says that food waste can be attributed to many factors.

“So, there’s a lot of different pieces to the puzzle on the farm, and we’re trying to understand those reasons,” he said. “And then we’re looking at what’s available, what might be some solution to either recover that food for donation or find a secondary market. What I mean by that is, actually selling grapes that might be a little too small for a bit of a discount and just saying, these are cosmetically imperfect, but they’re still perfectly edible.”

To help achieve California’s larger 2030 climate change goals, SB 1383 requires about 540 jurisdictions to provide organic waste collection services to residents and businesses.

And, while most households will now be pushed into practicing sustainable food waste practices by making sure food scraps are thrown out in the green bin, SB 1383 goes a step further.

The law also requires cities and counties to set up recovery programs by partnering with grocery chains, stores, schools, and federal and state agencies.

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New property tax complicating N.S. seasonal residents' retirement plans

Some people who live in Nova Scotia seasonally say they're considering selling their homes in the province because of a new property tax.The non-resident property tax was included in the Progressive Conservatives' ...

Some people who live in Nova Scotia seasonally say they're considering selling their homes in the province because of a new property tax.

The non-resident property tax was included in the Progressive Conservatives' provincial budget released last week. It charges $2 per $100 of assessed value to "non-resident" homeowners — those who principally live elsewhere — and it took effect Friday.

The tax has been billed as a measure to improve housing availability in Nova Scotia, and the PCs expect it to generate about $65.5 million in revenue to help fund programs to respond to the pressing needs of the province's growing population, including health care and education.

Vivian Lyons, who is from Virginia, expects her property tax bill to triple this year, totalling an estimated $27,000. She and her husband own a house in Kingsburg, located on Nova Scotia's South Shore, where they live for about six months every year.

Lyons called the new tax confiscatory and said she's doubtful it will solve the problem it was created to fix. She said about half of her neighbours in Kingsburg are seasonal residents.

"Real estate is simply a game of supply and demand and the supply in Nova Scotia simply is not meeting the demand," said Lyons, who was a realtor for 30 years. "Taxing people in rural areas is not going to encourage construction in urban areas."

The provincial government said there are about 27,000 properties owned by non-residents in the province.

A spokesperson for the Finance Department said there is housing scarcity across Nova Scotia and non-resident-owned residential properties are found across the province.

Bob Camozzi, who owns a home in Cape George in Antigonish County, said uncapped property assessments, which effectively result in a premium on property for non-residents, already work well to balance the market in rural areas.

"People are never going to be happy with a surcharge or a tax," said Camozzi, who lives in Oshawa, Ont., but typically spends May to October in Nova Scotia. "But we pay them because we know they're needed for local services that benefit our neighbors and our friends."

Top stars, best performances last week in Northern California high school baseball & softball (March 28 - April 3)

Last week featured some of the most unbelievable individual performances yet this season in baseball and softball.Even with some of the state gone for spring break, last week produced some of the craziest stat lines so far from the 2022 California high school baseball/softball season. That included some no-hitters, some multi-home run games, and everything in between. Here's a quick look at the top baseball and softball performance last week (March 28 - April 3) across Northern California.Note: Entries are based on informat...

Last week featured some of the most unbelievable individual performances yet this season in baseball and softball.

Even with some of the state gone for spring break, last week produced some of the craziest stat lines so far from the 2022 California high school baseball/softball season. That included some no-hitters, some multi-home run games, and everything in between. Here's a quick look at the top baseball and softball performance last week (March 28 - April 3) across Northern California.

Note: Entries are based on information provided by coaches, statisticians, media members and high school basketball fans. Don’t see any details for your team’s game? Email some stats to lance@scorebooklive.com. All spring sports – not just baseball and softball – are eligible!

SOFTBALL:

Riley Wickum, Sutter:

Wickum led the Huskies to a 3-0 week by pitching a no-hitter and another complete game victory with zero earned runs, and batting 8-11 with three doubles and four RBIs.

Cassiti Baroni, Fort Bragg:

Baroni tossed a perfect game and another complete game shutout playing in two of the Timberwolves' three games last week, and also hit 5-6 with a home run and four RBIs.

Taylor Rodriguez, Livermore:

Rodriguez threw complete game shutouts in both of Livermore's games last week, and hit 5-6 with two walks and a home run.

Kailani Tatro, Pinole Valley:

Tatro threw a no-hitter and another complete game shutout last week for the 2-0 Spartans.

Lexi Baumgartner, Quincy:

Baumgartner went 10-13 with two home runs, two triples, three doubles, and 14 RBIs for the 2-1 Trojans.

Samantha Rey, Notre Dame (Salinas):

Rey helped lead the Spirits to a 4-2 week batting 15-22 with three homers and eight RBIs.

Ariel Nava, St. Mary's (Stockton):

Nava threw back-to-back no-hitters plus another complete game shutout and went 3-1 in the circle to help lead the Rams to a 4-1 week. She also batted 7-16 and scored seven runs.

Anna Bean, Los Gatos:

Bean helped the Wildcats go 4-1 by pitching 21.2 innings with just one earned run allowed and 27 K's. She also drove in six runs at the dish.

Mia Traylor, Central:

Traylor threw a no-hitter and six-inning shutout to defeat Kingsburg 11-0.

Mallory O'Keefe, Petaluma:

O'Keefe batted 7-8 with a home run, a triple, three doubles, four runs, and four RBIs to lead the Trojans to a 2-0 week.

Faith Martinez, Cupertino:

Martinez went 7-7 with two home runs and nine RBIs in just two games, both blowout wins.

Tori Stinson, Central Catholic:

Stinson threw a no-hitter and batted 2-4 with four RBIs in a rout of Weston Ranch.

Emma Jackson, Salesian College Prep:

Jackson went 9-12 at bat with two homers, six RBIs, and eight runs scored to help lead the Pride to a 3-0 week.

Kylie Liu, Gunn:

Liu hit 7-10 with two homers, two doubles, and nine RBIs to lead the Titans to a 2-1 week.

Amanda Deng, Mission San Jose:

Deng hit 7-9 with five extra-base hits, seven RBIs, and six runs scored as the Warriors went 2-1.

BASEBALL:

Evan Bihlman, Woodland Christian:

Bihlman pitched a perfect game with 11 strikeouts against Foresthill and even went 2-3 with a long ball and three RBIs.

Adam Delgado, Kerman:

Delgado went 6-9 with 10 RBIs in just two games, both wins for the Lions. He drove in seven runs with three doubles and a single on Friday alone against Sierra.

Will Gagnon, Reedley:

Gagnon threw a one-hitter and complete game shutout in an 11-0 win against McLane, striking out a whopping 17 of 20 batters he faced.

Trey Morris, Washington Union:

Morris threw a one-hitter and fanned 10 for a complete game shutout and win against Firebaugh.

Connor Babler, Sutter:

Babler drove in 10 runs last week for the 2-1 Huskies, and hit two home runs in one win against Casa Roble.

Luke Kalfsbeek, Colusa:

Kalfsbeek helped lead the RedHawks to a two-game sweep of Winters, going 4-7 at the plate and throwing six innings with 10 K's and just one run allowed for a win.

Sutter Moss, Lassen:

Moss led the Grizzlies to a 3-0 week hitting 6-10 with three triples, a home run, two walks, 10 RBIs, and five runs scored.

Henry Bolte, Palo Alto:

Bolte helped lead the Vikings to a 3-0 week batting 7-10 with nine RBIs and six runs scored. He hit two homers in one game against Santa Clara and had six RBIs in that one alone.

Ernesto Hernandez, San Jose:

Hernandez led the Bulldogs to a 3-0 week by going 6-9 with four walks, stealing a whopping eight bases, and coming around to score seven times.

Sean Chen, Westmont:

Westmont led the Warriors to a pair of blowout wins against Del Mar, throwing a complete game shutout in one of them and batting a total of 4-7 with five RBIs and four runs scored.

Jackson Giacone, Eureka:

Giacone went 4-5 with two homers, seven walks, seven RBIs, and six runs to lead the Loggers to a three-game sweep of McKinleyville.

Tyler Davis, Vista Del Lago:

Davis helped lead the Eagles to a three-game sweep of El Camino hitting 6-9 with five runs scored and throwing a five-inning shutout.

Virgil Blake, Shasta:

Blake went 6-11 with seven runs scored and pitched 5.1 scoreless innings to help lead the Wolves to a 3-0 record.

Miles Lu, Leigh:

Lu threw a complete game shutout with only two hits and no walks allowed to defeat Ann Sobrato 1-0.

Holden Hirschkorn, Kingsburg:

Hirschkorn led the Vikings to a 2-1 week batting 6-9 with three doubles, a triple, and five RBIs.

Jarren Advincula, Archbishop Mitty:

Advincula went 5-7 with seven RBIs and a homer for the 2-1 Monarchs.

Logan Mooneyham, Stone Ridge Christian:

Mooneyham scored two runs and pitched four scoreless innings in a 6-1 win against Elliot Christian, and went 3-3 with two homers, a double, and five RBIs in the Knights' other game, a loss to BHCPA.

Benny Maxinoski, Ponderosa:

Maxinoski threw a complete game shutout that took eight innings in a 1-0 victory against Nevada Union.

Former exchange student from Ukraine seeking asylum will wait out process in Kingsburg

A former high school exchange student from Ukraine who spent a year in Kingsburg is returning to the Valley Wednesday night.It took six days but Nick Zinchenko finally got the green light from U.S. Immigration to return to Kingsburg and seek political asylum.Zinchenko was an exchange student at Kingsburg High from 2015 to 2016. It's a bond created seven years ago that Chad Thompson says still exists today."He is my son, he is our son, he's my son's brother. We've been tight ever since he came here in 2015."...

A former high school exchange student from Ukraine who spent a year in Kingsburg is returning to the Valley Wednesday night.

It took six days but Nick Zinchenko finally got the green light from U.S. Immigration to return to Kingsburg and seek political asylum.

Zinchenko was an exchange student at Kingsburg High from 2015 to 2016. It's a bond created seven years ago that Chad Thompson says still exists today.

"He is my son, he is our son, he's my son's brother. We've been tight ever since he came here in 2015."

After high school Zinchenko decided to become a sailor. Last Friday the boat he was working on pulled into port in Houston.

Zinchenko was told by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that he had to return to Ukraine immediately. He alerted the Thompson Family and Chad was waiting for him in Houston.

"I was able to see Nick for ten minutes. Give him a hug. That's when Nick claimed asylum and they basically took him into custody, handcuffed him and took him off to some office."

Thompson hired a Texas attorney and waited for days in his hotel room. He decided to come back to Kingsburg on Tuesday.

"As soon as I hung up the phone with the attorney Nick called from his own cell phone saying Dad I'm out."

His attorney warned Thompson the asylum process can take up to two years. Zinchenko's parents and youngest sister are stuck in Kiev Ukraine but they support his decision to seek asylum.

"They're very grateful to me, my wife and family for everything we've don't for Nick."

During our interview Nick called to say he was heading to the Houston airport.

"You don't have to thank me buddy we love you."

While Zinchenko goes through the asylum process he'll be back with his Kingsburg family, making new memories.

His place lands Wednesday night at the Fresno airport just before midnight.

The Thompson Family has set up a gofundme account to help pay legal fees and travel expenses.

Here's the link: https://www.gofundme.com/f/help-nick-stay-in-the-us-and-safe?member=17702681&sharetype=teams&utm_campaign=p_na+share-

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