Appliance Repair in Kerman, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Kerman, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Kerman, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Kerman, CA

Central Section girls volleyball, tennis playoff brackets unveiled

The Arroyo Grande, Nipomo and Righetti girls volleyball teams all drew first-round home matches for the CIF Central Section Playoffs.The No. 5 Arroyo Grande girls tennis team also drew a first-round home match, against No. 12 Bakersfield Stockdale Tuesday. The No. 8 Santa Ynez tennis squad is also at home in the first round of Division 1 Tuesday, against No. 9 Clovis.Tennis playoff matches at courts that have lights are designated to start at 4 p.m. each round. Matches at courts with no lights are to start no later than 3 p.m. ...

The Arroyo Grande, Nipomo and Righetti girls volleyball teams all drew first-round home matches for the CIF Central Section Playoffs.

The No. 5 Arroyo Grande girls tennis team also drew a first-round home match, against No. 12 Bakersfield Stockdale Tuesday. The No. 8 Santa Ynez tennis squad is also at home in the first round of Division 1 Tuesday, against No. 9 Clovis.

Tennis playoff matches at courts that have lights are designated to start at 4 p.m. each round. Matches at courts with no lights are to start no later than 3 p.m. each round.

No. 2 Arroyo Grande will host No. 15 Bakersfield Frontier in a first-round Division 1 volleyball match Tuesday night. No. 6 Nipomo will host No. 11 Madera South, and No. 7 Santa Ynez will host No. 10 Reedley in Division 3. No. 7 Righetti will host No. 10 Tulare Western in Division 4.

Volleyball playoff matches are slated for a 6 p.m. start each round. Tennis and volleyball playoff matches will be at the site of the highest-seeded team each time.

Three area teams drew road assignments. In Division 3 tennis, No. 10 Lompoc will play at No. 7 Paso Robles, and No. 12 Nipomo will play at No. 5 Coalinga.

Paso Robles edged Lompoc 5-4 in a non-league match in Lompoc's opener. The Braves went on to go 14-0 in Ocean League matches and win the league championship.

No. 13 St. Joseph will play at No. 4 Hanford Sierra Pacific in a first-round Division 3 volleyball match.

Among northern San Luis Obispo County teams, No. 5 San Luis Obispo will play at No. 4 Clovis West in a first-round Division 1 volleyball match.

In Division 2, No. 9 Paso Robles will play at No. 8 Fresno Central, and No. 12 Templeton will play at No. 5 Fresno San Joaquin Memorial.

In Division 3, No. 14 Mission Prep will play at No. 3 Porterville, No. 13 Atascadero will play at No. 4 Hanford in Division 4 and No. 16 Morro Bay will play at top seed McFarland in Division 5.

No. 3 San Luis Obispo, the Mountain League champion, drew a first-round bye in Division 1 tennis. No. 2 Templeton drew a first-round bye in Division 2. In Division 4, No. 11 Morro Bay will play at No. 6 Orosi.

Top tennis playoff seeds include Bakersfield Garces in Division 1, Visalia Central Valley Christian in Division 2, Kerman in Division 3, Corcoran in Division 4 and Chowchilla in Division 5. No San Luis Obispo County or northern Santa Barbara County teams are in the Division 5 tennis playoffs.

Top volleyball playoff seeds include Clovis East in Division 1, Clovis Buchanan in Division 2, Kingsburg in Division 3, Mammoth in Division 4 and McFarland in Division 5.

Kenny Cress is a sports reporter for the Santa Maria Times, covering local sports in northern Santa Barbara County. You can send information or story ideas to him by emailing it to KCress@SantaMariaTimes.com.

Finance Director Forward this Job

The Position Under direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, manages and directs centralized accounting and financial administration programs; provides administrative direction and oversight for purchasing, information technology, risk management, grants, budget and fiscal analysis; may serve as City Controller and City Treasurer.This is an at-will, management (FLSA exempt) position that reports directly to the City Manager and is an essential member of the Executive Management Team. The Director will supervise...

The Position Under direction of the City Manager, plans, organizes, manages and directs centralized accounting and financial administration programs; provides administrative direction and oversight for purchasing, information technology, risk management, grants, budget and fiscal analysis; may serve as City Controller and City Treasurer.

This is an at-will, management (FLSA exempt) position that reports directly to the City Manager and is an essential member of the Executive Management Team. The Director will supervise and lead the Department and be responsible for the implementation of City and Departmental goals and objectives, policies and priorities.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities · Direct the general accounting activities of the municipality including the maintenance of general ledgers and related subsidiary records. · Prepare financial reports reflecting the financial status of the Administration, Public Works, Community Services, Finance, Police and Community Development departments of the municipality including housing, grants, public utilities, and others as appropriate. · Develop and maintain internal accounting controls. · Plan, develop, implement and administer the cash management and investment program. · Administer the City’s insurance program and centralized purchasing. · Prepare the annual draft and final operating and capital improvement budgets. · Forecast City revenues, expenditures and year-end balances. · Coordinate and conduct municipal bond sales. · Respond to requests for information, reports or action from the City Manager, City Council, Department Heads and citizens regarding fiscal matters. · Oversee coordinate the Information Technology functions of the City. · Prepare special financial reports, studies and analysis.

Minimum Qualifications Education — Equivalent to a Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university with major course work in finance, accounting, business administration, economics or closely related field. Experience — Seven years’ progressively responsible administrative and management experience in accounting and financial work. In place of the above requirements, any combination of relevant education and experience which demonstrates the knowledge, skill and ability to perform the essential functions of the job will be considered. License/Certificate — Membership in GFOA or CSMFO desired, CA CPA License and Notary Public License preferred and desired. Possession of a valid California Class C Drivers License is required.

Compensation and Benefits Salary—DOQ. The City offers a comprehensive and competitive benefit package.

The Process Applications can be obtained on the City’s website at www.cityofkerman.net. Please contact Akayla Cheema, Human Resource Specialist with any questions, (559) 846-9851 or acheema@cityofkerman.org

To be considered for this career opportunity, please submit a City of Kerman employment application, and resume to: City of Kerman, Finance Director Recruitment Attn: Akayla Cheema 850 S. Madera Avenue Kerman, CA 93630 Or acheema@cityofkerman.org

Filing deadline: Friday, December 2, 2022 at 4 PM

Applicants will be competitively screened based on the minimum qualifications. After review of the application materials, the most qualified candidates will be invited to participate in the examination process, which will consist of oral interviews.

Cow manure at this Kerman dairy can moo-ve cars

KERMAN, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – Kerman-based farm “Bar 20” has won an award for “Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability” for its efforts to reduce emissions – including capturing methane from their 7,000 cows and converting it into renewable electricity.Every year the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards recognizes dairy farms, businesses, and collaborative partnerships that are committed to healthy products, healthy communitie...

KERMAN, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – Kerman-based farm “Bar 20” has won an award for “Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability” for its efforts to reduce emissions – including capturing methane from their 7,000 cows and converting it into renewable electricity.

Every year the U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards recognizes dairy farms, businesses, and collaborative partnerships that are committed to healthy products, healthy communities, and a healthy planet.

The methane captured at “Bar 20” is converted using what’s called a dairy digestor – described as basically a big pond.

“Ours holds 25,000,000 gallons of dairy waste, which is manure and liquids. (…) Dual lining protects it from going into the groundwater and then it’s covered so that the gasses cannot escape into the atmosphere,” explained farm operator Steve Shehadey.

Their other green investments include changing their bulbs to LEDs in their barns, reducing the demand for electricity by 75%, and two solar array installations. But their biggest addition to reducing their carbon footprint is their dairy digestor.

This first-of-its-kind, next-generation, climate-smart digestor can capture more than 25,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions annually. The electricity generated from the methane is created without combustion and its smog and asthma-producing pollution. Also, it has the ability to do something that solar energy can’t.

“They can produce power 24 hours a day. Solar is good when the sun is out but when it’s cloudy or rainy you don’t get energy. These types of projects will produce four times the power that solar will because it runs twenty-four hours a day”, said Shehadey.

In this process of creating this renewable energy, nothing is wasted.

“You take that waste which is kind of a liability and we turn it into power. Then we use that liquid after it goes through the digestor to fertilize the crops. We turn a negative which is dairy waste into power and organic fertilizer. Everything gets recycled”, continued Shehadey.

Bar 20 produces enough energy that it participates in the “Low Carbon Fuel Standard Program”. Partnering with BMW North America, they send the combustion-free electricity via the utility grid to power electric vehicles. The result in carbon emission reduction is equivalent to providing clean power to over 17,000 electric cars per year.

“If you’re going to be in the dairy business we thought let’s invest in the future. We live here, this is where we’ve raised our families. Let’s do something that will help us survive these tough times”, said Shehadey.

Kerman community rallying around former Fresno State football player battling ALS

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- One of ten siblings growing up in Kerman, Efrain Guizar found his purpose on the football field."I was a young boy, got to watch a game on the berm before they built the stadium, my older brother took me there," he said. "That's what I want to do, I want to be a Bulldog."After playing for the Kerman Lions, Guizar started coaching Pop Warner. When Pat Hill was hired to be the head coach in 1997, his brother convinced him to try out. It had been three years since he last put on the pad...

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- One of ten siblings growing up in Kerman, Efrain Guizar found his purpose on the football field.

"I was a young boy, got to watch a game on the berm before they built the stadium, my older brother took me there," he said. "That's what I want to do, I want to be a Bulldog."

After playing for the Kerman Lions, Guizar started coaching Pop Warner. When Pat Hill was hired to be the head coach in 1997, his brother convinced him to try out. It had been three years since he last put on the pads.

"I stayed the course, but being the smallest, slowest, weakest guy on the team, literally bottom of the depth chart, persevered and worked hard got me to where I am today, thanks to that," Guizar said.

Once he made the team, his top goal was to make special teams so he could travel.

"You don't fall asleep in a meeting with Coach Baxter," Guizar said. "You better know your routine, all sayings of special teams that are out there. If you fall asleep, you have to stand on a chair during the meeting."

At the start of the '97 season, his number was finally called, subbing in at safety for an injured Cory Hall.

"Coach Coyle does a big packet of the scouting report and I would sit in the hotel and study it," Guizar said. "I made sure if I got the opportunity to get on the field, I better not make a mistake."

Over two seasons, the walk-on would play 21 games, coming away with eight interceptions -- two of which were returned for a touchdown.

Guizar says it's special seeing his former coaches return to the Bulldog sidelines.

"It actually hits home because they were there when I was there," he said. "They gave me an opportunity, they gave me a chance."

On the field, Guizar battled for the Bulldogs. Today, he's battling something new.

After carpal tunnel surgery in both arms, the pain and shaking in his hand returned. After several tests at Stanford Medical Center, he was diagnosed with ALS in October of last year.

"Wake up every day and take it one day at a time, don't cry in front of my kids," he said. "The only time I did was on the 29th when I had to tell them. I do all the tears and crying on my own when I need to and with my wife."

Ten days a month, Efrain takes an infusion to slow the progression of the disease.

"The first time we started the infusion at home, I was a little stressed out because I wasn't familiar with the process," he sai. "But now, I'm very familiar -- I can do it in my sleep."

There's currently no cure for the disease. When the Kerman community learned of his diagnosis, they came together to help the family.

"The community refused to not want to help us," Guizar said. "My coworker, he was an assistant coach when I played at Kerman. He got people to cover a year of lawn service, housekeeping and pool service. An Anonymous donor covered the cost of flooring to be installed. Doctors told me I couldn't have any transition pieces -- get rid of tile, carpet, get rid of everything."

Guizar says the Kerman community made a big impact on his life and he wants to give back in the best way he knows how -- coaching football.

"Everybody loves him, what's not to love," says Mandy Guizar. "He's amazing. He's such a role model, he's had former players come over on prom night so he can tie their ties. I open the door and there's a kid going, 'Hey, is Coach Guizar here so he can tie our ties?'"

Later start times present new challenges for school leaders

Do you count on EdSource’s education coverage? If so, please make your donation today to keep us going without a paywall or ads.As school bells across the state ring at a different time than usual this year for middle and high school students due to a new law mandating later start times, administrators have had to tackle some new challenges, including navigating student and parent needs....

Do you count on EdSource’s education coverage? If so, please make your donation today to keep us going without a paywall or ads.

As school bells across the state ring at a different time than usual this year for middle and high school students due to a new law mandating later start times, administrators have had to tackle some new challenges, including navigating student and parent needs.

Senate Bill 328 requires high schools to begin no earlier than 8:30 a.m. and middle schools no earlier than 8 a.m.

Although the change will kick in at most districts as school begins in the coming days, a few were early implementers, giving them a year or two to fine-tune bus and bell schedules and get feedback from parents.

At Kerman Unified in Fresno County, the 5,230-student district is going into its third year on the new schedule. Superintendent Robert Frausto said he’s addressed the two big issues: transportation and before- and after-school supervision.

All Kerman Unified schools used to begin at 8 a.m., but after social distancing was required on buses during the pandemic, they switched to a tiered system where drivers make two trips: one to pick up and drop off elementary students, and a second for older students. That limited the number of students on the bus at a given time.

Because the start times needed to be staggered for the new system, Frausto said he “might as well bite the bullet” and get in line with the coming law. It was signed in 2019, giving schools three years to make the change.

Frausto said he actually finds the new bus system more cost-effective. The more tiers, the fewer drivers are needed, he said.

“In our case, we’ve saved probably three to four drivers,” he said. “So, we’re saving a couple hundred thousand dollars.”

San Francisco Unified School District changed its start times last year, according to spokesperson Laura Dudnick, and the district also saw savings in the transportation department.

“SFUSD saves about $3 million each year in transportation costs, which can instead be spent on directly supporting students,” she said. “Since start times are spaced out by 50 minutes (7:50, 8:40, and 9:30), each bus can be used to transport students to three different schools.”

Before the pandemic, the district’s K-12 schools all began at different times, ranging from 7:40 to 9:40 a.m.

“This was unusual for school districts and presented logistical challenges for families and school communities,” Dudnick said.

Parents in Kerman also voiced concern about younger students needing supervision, Frausto said. It was a problem that high schoolers were dismissed later than their younger siblings, and the buses dropped the youngest students off first, leaving them unsupervised until their siblings got home an hour later.

“We resolved that by putting (students) in after-school programs, and even expanding our after-school programs,” Frausto said.

The district is using grant funding along with their district funding “to make sure we don’t have any parents on the waiting list,” he said. “I don’t want that to be an issue.”

For parents who need to drop off students early to get to work, they added hours for instructional aides to help with morning supervision.

Manteca Unified in Stanislaus County will enter its second year on the new schedule. It was a highly unpopular law in the community, according to Victoria Brunn, Manteca Unified’s chief business and information officer.

“A change in schedule that drastically affects us internally and externally,” she said. “Bell schedules are how we run as a system, and when you alter those significantly, it changes the entire operation for students, for families and for staff.”

Manteca Unified has an enrollment of over 23,000 students.

“What we heard the most from our students is their inability to get part-time work that many of our kiddos need,” she said. “Many of our students have part-time jobs … but who can start a part-time job when you’re getting out of school so late?”

Both Brunn and Frausto said they’ve been able to tweak the start times while still staying within the state’s mandated instructional time.

Manteca Unified high schools were getting out at 4 p.m. last year. One of the biggest lessons the district learned was, “wherever we can squeeze out five minutes, squeeze it out, right?” Brunn said. “Wherever we can cut the school day so that we can get our students to part-time work or to community internships or to their extracurriculars or their co-curriculars, we need to try and do that.”

They managed to shave off half an hour for this year, she said.

“We heard our students last year and our families, and had many conversations with our teachers, (the) union, our leadership team and looking at the mandatory minutes required,” she said. “All those factors come into play, and it’s not easy. It took us an entire year to find that half hour.”

Frausto said his district was playing with the times the last two years and found bus drivers were able to finish their routes earlier than anticipated.

So this year high schools were adjusted 10 minutes back to begin at 8:30 a.m. and elementary schools went 10 minutes forward to 8 a.m.

“Ten minutes believe it or not,” he said, meant a lot to parents and staff trying to get to sports and after-school activities.

As for the cost of the new law, Brunn said the district will now have to get lighting installed in its softball and baseball fields.

“There is less daylight for practices,” she said, adding that electricity is the “second costliest line item in schools.”

When SB 328 went into effect this July, it made California the first state in the U.S. to mandate later start times for teens, amid evidence that their natural sleep-wake cycle is different from children and adults, making it difficult for them to get a good night’s sleep if school starts too early. There are now similar bills in New York and New Jersey.

There is an exemption for rural schools, which some, such as Oakdale Unified in Stanislaus County, have taken.

“There is no schedule that corresponds exactly (to parents’ needs), and we really do need to acknowledge that our teens are suffering and sleep deprivation is making things harder for them,” said Lisa L. Lewis, the authorwho helped spark the law by writing an op-ed that got the attention of Sen. Anthony Portantino, who authored SB 328.

“I feel like something that’s incredibly important to highlight is mental health and the fact that sleep deprivation absolutely exacerbates depression, anxiety (and) suicidality,” she said.

Lewis pointed out several studies that found later start times do help teens sleep more. Only 22% of teens get at least eight hours of sleep, according to the 2019 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends teens sleep eight to 10 hours, and in 2014 it recommended school not start before 8:30 a.m.

But Frausto and Brunn have opposing views on whether the law is helping their students. Brunn didn’t think data comparing tardiness in schools from year to year would be very useful.

“That’s a really tough question to answer because of the pandemic,” she said. “Unfortunately, this is coming in at the same time as other variables, so I don’t know that you can isolate it.”

But both offered their own view on the law.

“The impact of this bill was so students were able to get more quality sleep,” Brunn said. “We’re not necessarily seeing that from our student population, that they’re going to bed early.”

As for parent input, “our qualitative data, specifically, is that our parents were not happy with the change, across the board.”

Frausto said he used to be a principal at the Merced City School District, where start times would sometimes “flip flop” from one year to the next.

“What I saw as a principal, and I would say my secondary principals (in Kerman) would agree with this, is that we had a lot (fewer) tardies with the late start time for secondary versus if it were early,” he said.

“When we had an early start time for secondary, oh my God, the line for late students was out the door. And then when we had a late time for secondary, there were a lot (fewer) tardies.”

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