Appliance Repair in Huron, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We work with your busy schedule to get you the service you need.

Technician Diagnoses
Technician Diagnoses

Your factory-trained technician will travel to your location and diagnose your appliance problem.

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Quote & Repair

We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Huron, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Huron, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
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  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Huron, CA

Disabled paddle boarder makes history after crossing Lake Huron

The 28 hour journey across Lake Huron has taken its toll on Mike Shoreman, as Huron County paramedics take a look at the Toronto native’s battered feet, moments after his triumphant arrival on Goderich’s shores.“We had beautiful conditions and weather to wicked waves and winds that blew me off course, to a freezing, pretty scary night,” said Shoreman, who is attempting to paddle board across all five Great Lakes this summer.Shoreman is the first disabled paddle boarder to ever complete the 73 kilometre j...

The 28 hour journey across Lake Huron has taken its toll on Mike Shoreman, as Huron County paramedics take a look at the Toronto native’s battered feet, moments after his triumphant arrival on Goderich’s shores.

“We had beautiful conditions and weather to wicked waves and winds that blew me off course, to a freezing, pretty scary night,” said Shoreman, who is attempting to paddle board across all five Great Lakes this summer.

Shoreman is the first disabled paddle boarder to ever complete the 73 kilometre journey across Lake Huron. He crossed Lake Erie two weeks ago and plans to cross all five Great Lakes by the end of August, becoming the first person to make the attempt since Vicki Keith swam all five Great Lakes in 1988.

“He’s incredible. It’s hard enough to stand up on a paddle board, let alone in the middle of one of the largest lakes in the world, and he crossed it,” said one his coaches and friends, Brandon Evans.

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Shoreman is doing all this all in the name of youth mental health. He suffered a mental breakdown after a sudden onset of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome four years ago.

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome is the same disorder currently currently afflicting Justin Bieber. It left part of Shoreman’s face paralyzed and his speech, hearing and mobility severely compromised.

He owned a paddle board company at the time, and was told he’d never paddle board again.

“When you lose your mobility, you lose your independence. I realized because of my own mental health journey, that I don’t want kids to ever feel that way. I don’t want young people to feel isolated, and scared, and alone, like I felt,” said Shoreman.

He’s working with Jack.org to raise money for youth mental programs in schools with his Great Lakes journey.

Even though he’s hurting right now, Shoreman will do it all again in a couple weeks time.

“The window for Lake Michigan will open June 26th. Lake Superior is in July, and the finale is Lake Ontario in August,” said Shoreman.

Shoreman has raised $50,000 towards his $250,000 goal, and you can learn more about his Great Lakes Crossings on the Jack.org website that is detailing his journey.

Army gets its first Indigenous commander as Lt.-Gen. Jocelyn (Joe) Paul takes over

The Canadian Army has its first Indigenous commander.Lt.-Gen. Jocelyn (Joe) Paul assumed the post on Thursday, taking over from Maj.-Gen. Michel-Henri St-Louis, who has been the acting top soldier since last year.Paul is a respected member of the army who served as one of the country's battle group commanders during the Afghan war. He started his career with the Royal 22e Regiment but most recently served as deputy commander of NATO Allied Joint Forces Command in Naples, Italy.He has for several years been the highest-ra...

The Canadian Army has its first Indigenous commander.

Lt.-Gen. Jocelyn (Joe) Paul assumed the post on Thursday, taking over from Maj.-Gen. Michel-Henri St-Louis, who has been the acting top soldier since last year.

Paul is a respected member of the army who served as one of the country's battle group commanders during the Afghan war. He started his career with the Royal 22e Regiment but most recently served as deputy commander of NATO Allied Joint Forces Command in Naples, Italy.

He has for several years been the highest-ranking Indigenous member of the military. A member of the Huron-Wendat First Nation from the community of Wendake, Que., Paul has spoken often about how his culture and personal history have shaped him as a soldier and individual.

But his promotion to army commander is a milestone.

"If I can be of any help, if I can inspire some young man or young woman who are hesitating to sign up for a military career, and if I can have five, six, 10, 15, 20 more Aboriginal soldiers, I guess I feel I will have done my duty," Paul told reporters following the change of command.

He said he was "deeply grateful" for the opportunity to command the Canadian Army at a critical moment in history, with a war raging in Europe.

"From the Baltic to the Black Sea, our NATO allies recognize the tradition of excellence of the Canadian Armed Forces and of the Canadian Army, and all of this is only made possible by those who wear the uniform," Paul said in the official Department of National Defence statement.

Thursday's command ceremony at the Cartier Square drill hall in Ottawa was filled with personal significance for Paul.

Andrée Levesque Sioui, who is also a Wendat from Paul's home community, performed a canoe song originally composed by one of Paul's ancestors just over 100 years ago.

'Respect, dignity and humility'

Paul said he expects everyone in the army to act with "respect, dignity and humility." He recalled his days leading combat troops in Kandahar where, he said, "gender, race, ethnicity, language and sexual orientation" were never discussed.

"Because we were out there facing adversity, helping and protecting one another," Paul said. "We were focused on the team."

Paul takes command just as the military is going through a major leadership crisis.

The former officer who had been in line to be army commander, retired lieutenant-general Trevor Cadieu, was formally charged on Wednesday with two counts of sexual assault in connection with allegations dating back to the mid-1990s.

It was only the latest in a series of sexual misconduct cases and allegations which have sidelined — or forced the resignations of — as many as 11 senior military leaders.

Northern Tornadoes Project investigating East London for possible Tornado

Cleanup is still underway from Saturday’s massive storm that hit Southwestern Ontario, and not everyone in the region has their power restored.While both London Hydro crews and the City of London, Ont. Forestry department work to clear streets and store power, the Western University Northern Tornadoes Project (NTP) is investigating data from the Derecho which blew through the area.“A Derecho is a widespread, long-lived, fast-moving windstorm, and this one actually snuck up on us a bit,” says Dave Sills, the ex...

Cleanup is still underway from Saturday’s massive storm that hit Southwestern Ontario, and not everyone in the region has their power restored.

While both London Hydro crews and the City of London, Ont. Forestry department work to clear streets and store power, the Western University Northern Tornadoes Project (NTP) is investigating data from the Derecho which blew through the area.

“A Derecho is a widespread, long-lived, fast-moving windstorm, and this one actually snuck up on us a bit,” says Dave Sills, the executive director of the NTP.

“I was all over the computer models the day before because we were thinking there might be a possibility of a tornado in Eastern Ontario into Quebec. There was nothing about the Derecho coming. It basically started in Chicago, blew through Windsor, blew through London, and all the way to Quebec City.”

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The NTP sent teams to Uxbridge and Ottawa because the damage was so intense there compared to the rest of the province. They were expecting probable tornadoes embedded in the leading edge of the Derecho in those cases.

Sills knew there was some damage, so he went out Sunday to investigate.

“What I found was mostly consistent with just the straight-line winds with trees down, and some building damage,” says Sills.

“The one area that has a possibility of being a tornado is along Huron and east of Highbury, but I still have to look at the data. It was basically, as a long narrow path of enhanced damage.”

Sills has just started mapping the data he’s collected and isn’t sure exactly how wide or long the path of destruction was in that area.

“It seems like it's about five kilometres long, less than a kilometre wide, but I think it's even narrower than that,” he says.

“You're starting to get into an embedded tornado kind of category. I also am looking at radar right now to see if there was any rotation associated with the storm as it came through. So we kind of put together all these different clues, especially with these more complicated events to see if everything fits together.”

While making his rounds after the storm, Sills discovered a lot of the trees in the forested areas of the city and the older parts of the city are not the healthiest. In the Old East Village area, he says a number of trees were rotted and just came apart. However, in the Huron St. area, most of them looked like healthy trees that were just snapped.

He is hoping to analyze his data soon, but he’s been very busy with interview requests from the Ottawa-area, and even international media.

“The New York Times wanted an interview today, so this is making news internationally, especially with the number of fatalities,” says Sills.

While the cleanup from the great storm continues, Sills doesn’t expect to see another one of these events in the near future.

“Thankfully they are fairly rare in Canada,” says Sills.

“In the US they get them every couple of years, but in Canada, it’s more like every five or 10 years. The last really memorable one for us is back in the 1990s so it's been a while since people have heard the term Derecho and it's and I guess that's a good thing.”

As of noon Monday, London Hydro was reporting 24 outages remaining across the City of London.

Get Tickets Soon For 2022 Fall Colour Agawa Canyon Train Tour in Ontario

If you are planning to take a trip this fall across Agawa Canyon on a train, then get tickets before they sell out.The extremely popular train tour are already on sale, and the busy October weekend tickets are already on the verge of selling out. The spectacular Agawa Canyon Train Tours explore the Canadian shield...

If you are planning to take a trip this fall across Agawa Canyon on a train, then get tickets before they sell out.

The extremely popular train tour are already on sale, and the busy October weekend tickets are already on the verge of selling out. The spectacular Agawa Canyon Train Tours explore the Canadian shield with its rugged beauty, untouched forests and beautiful rivers.

The train tours this year begin on August 1st and the last trip is on Thanksgiving Monday.

The journey is extremely magical during fall and you can enjoy the myriad colours of the season – from golden yellows to breathtaking hues of red and orange.

The train begins from Sault Ste. Marie and you will be travelling 114 miles north, descending 500 feet over the last 10 miles to reach your destination at Agawa Canyon.

Once the train reaches the stunning Canyon Park, you can spend an hour and a half exploring the park. The Canyon park has well-maintained, fine gravel trails that will lead you to 4 waterfalls and amazing scenery.

The Algoma region has been the inspiration of artists, who have shared the beauty of this place with other people through their art. Between 1918 and 1923, the Group of Seven made stunning artwork here. These included Lawren Harris, A.Y. Jackson, Franz Johnston, J.E.H. MacDonald and Arthur Lismer.

The train tours start at 8:00 a.m and take 4 hours to Agawa Canyon Park. After a 90 minutes stop, the train takes another 4.5 hours to return to Sault Ste. Marie.

You may like: South Simcoe Railway: Take a Historic Scenic Train Tour Through Beeton Creek Valley Near Toronto

Agawa Canyon Train Tour Trip Planning

What: A must-do Ontario Fall experience. There really isn’t a more exciting way to discover and see the Agawa Canyon than to take a tour on the Agawa Canyon Tour Train.

When: August 1 to October 10, 2022 | 8 a.m.

How much:

Where: Agawa Canyon Tour Train Station is located at 87 Huron St in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

Tay residents treated to informative SSEA water event (4 photos)

On a day where storm warnings were in effect across Ontario, the town of Port McNicoll felt a reprieve during an information session on water quality and the environment.The 2022 Lake Huron Georgian Bay Community Watershed Actions event was held by the Severn Sound Environmental Association (SSEA) this week in Port McNicoll.“I think it’s a good example of the partnership that we were able to form some 20 years ago with local municipalities,” said Tay Township Mayor Ted Walker.Approximately a dozen booth...

On a day where storm warnings were in effect across Ontario, the town of Port McNicoll felt a reprieve during an information session on water quality and the environment.

The 2022 Lake Huron Georgian Bay Community Watershed Actions event was held by the Severn Sound Environmental Association (SSEA) this week in Port McNicoll.

“I think it’s a good example of the partnership that we were able to form some 20 years ago with local municipalities,” said Tay Township Mayor Ted Walker.

Approximately a dozen booths and information areas were set up in the Tay Community Rink surrounding the seating area, allowing attendees to ask questions of experts who provided insight to regional environmental projects.

Several speeches were made by dignitaries such as Mayor Walker as well as Simcoe County Warden and Tiny Township Mayor George Cornell, Tiny Deputy Mayor and SSEA chair Steffen Walma, and Councillor Justin Dumont of the Georgian Bay Métis Council.

Guest speakers included Kim Gavine, general manager at Conservation Ontario; former Muskoka Watershed Council chair and retired ecologist Kevin Trimble; and Glenn Cunnington, manager of watershed programs at District of Muskoka.

Julie Cayley, executive director for the SSEA, was pleased with the attendance, for those in person and at home.

“Hopefully, it will inspire people to understand that they are making a difference, that working together is how we make a difference,” said Cayley.

“For us at Severn Sound Environmental Association, this has been a great day to celebrate the fact that our eight municipalities in North Simcoe came together – to work together to protect water quality – which is a really unique situation. We’re very proud to be part of that.”

Other groups participating in the event included: Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority as the event co-host; Georgian Bay Forever; Grey Sauble Conservation Authority; Georgian Bay Biosphere; Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority; and the Simcoe County Soil and Crop Improvement Association. Miller’s Dairy from Creemore was also on hand to serve ice cream to the attendees.

Cayley provided advice for residents looking to assist in their own awareness of the environment, starting with what they can do in their own neighbourhoods.

“This is the time of year to start watching for algae blooms and different aspects of water quality,” said Cayley. “We would encourage anyone who sees something that they’re worried about, that they give the Severn Sound Environmental Association office a call or check our website and get in touch with us that way.”

The 2022 Lake Huron Georgian Bay Community Watershed Actions event was live-streamed and recorded for participants unable to attend in person, and is available on the SSEA YouTube channel.

Further details on the event and other information can be obtained through the Severn Sound Environmental Association website.

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