Appliance Repair in Hughson, CA

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Hughson, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Latest News in Hughson, CA

Monday, September 12, 2022

Royal Society of Canada honours six Waterloo researchersThis article was originally published on the Office of Research website.Six University of Waterloo researchers have been honoured by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC).Five new Fellows and one new College Member are among 156 other Canadian researchers elected by their peers for outstanding scholarly, scientific, and artist...

Royal Society of Canada honours six Waterloo researchers

This article was originally published on the Office of Research website.

Six University of Waterloo researchers have been honoured by the Royal Society of Canada (RSC).

Five new Fellows and one new College Member are among 156 other Canadian researchers elected by their peers for outstanding scholarly, scientific, and artistic achievement announced by the RSC.

Marie-Claire Cordonier Segger (School of Environment, Enterprise and Development) is a pioneering full professor and renowned jurist in sustainable development law and governance, advancing solutions to climate change, natural resources degradation and other critical global sustainability challenges while interactionally informing UN treaty design and compliance. As international award-winning CISDL Senior Director, her ground-breaking scholarly publications include the textbook Sustainable Development Law (OUP 2004, 2024); Athena’s Treaties (OUP 2021) and the Implementing Treaties for Sustainable Development series (CUP 2008-).

Carl Haas (Civil and Environmental Engineering) has contributed seminal new knowledge in the principles behind, the interdependencies among and the circular economic applications of computer vision, mixed reality, building information modeling and human-robotic-systems. Key barriers in the way of moving toward a circular economy in the built environment include the scale, complexity, and uncertainty associated with constructing, maintaining and deconstructing our built environment. His contributions improve complex, built environment systems’ performance.

Randy Allen Harris (English Language and Literature) researches the intersection of rhetoric, linguistics, cognitive neuroscience, and Artificial Intelligence at the University of Waterloo, where he is a Professor of English Language and Literature and Director of the multinational, multisectoral, and multidisciplinary research project, the Rhetoricon Database. His books include The Linguistics Wars (“outstanding”—Nature), Rhetoric and Incommensurability (“a real tour de force”—International Studies in the Philosophy of Science), and the pathbreaking Voice Interaction Design (“supremely practical”— ACM Books).

Richard Hughson (Kinesiology and Health Sciences) is Schlegel Research Chair in Vascular Aging and Brain Health in the Schlegel-UW Research Institute for Aging. His NASA award-winning research revealed accelerated vascular aging for astronauts on the International Space Station and implications for vascular aging on Earth. His pioneering work on human cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise and physical inactivity continues to profoundly influence research directions in Canada and around the world.

Anita Layton (Applied Mathematics) is an internationally acclaimed authority and leading researcher in mathematical medicine and biology. She has solved long-standing problems in scientific computing and renal physiology. She is recognized for her pioneering contributions to computational methods for fluidstructure interaction problems, and to mathematical modeling of mammalian physiology and pathophysiology, including the first sexspecific models of kidney physiology and blood pressure regulation.

Kristina R. Llewellyn (Social Development Studies, Renison University College) is one of Canada’s leading scholars in history and education whose research tackles vital questions in teaching, oral history, and justice. Author and co-editor of four books, including Democracy’s Angels: The Work of Women Teachers and the award-winning Oral History, Education, and Justice, she is a publicly engaged commentator on education issues, promoting nuanced understandings and practices of history, teaching, and learning for an equitable society.

Nominations now open for the Award of Excellence in Graduate Supervision

Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs (GSPA), in collaboration with the Graduate Student Association (GSA-UW), established this award to recognize exemplary faculty members who have demonstrated excellence in graduate student supervision, through being a mentor, advisor, role model, humanist and a strategist who exemplifies a high level of energy and ingenuity.

Nominations are initiated by a current or former graduate student who is/was directly supervised by the faculty member. Recipients of this prestigious award receive $1,000.

Looking for inspiration? A list of previous graduate supervision winners can be found online.

The nomination deadline is November 12. Full nomination requirements can be found on the Award of Excellence in Graduate Supervision web page.

Changes to Toronto's public transit system would eliminate barriers, retain riders

People who rely on public transit in Toronto will eventually have to choose different means of transportation if they can afford it or risk isolation unless the current system improves, a new study found.

The research from the University of Waterloo indicates that a lack of attention to core riders— meaning those dependent on public transportation—further marginalizes and creates mobility barriers that impede participation in public life.

Making public transit a viable option for vulnerable users aligns with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals of building resilient communities that are environmentally stable and progressively working toward reducing inequalities in marginalized populations.

Khairunnabila Prayitno, a PhD candidate at the University of Waterloo and Markus Moos, a professor in the School of Planning at Waterloo, examined transit use by core users in Toronto to determine the issues they face.

“Core public transportation users are usually those of lower income and often people from equity deserving populations who have no other option but to use public transportation,” said Prayitno. “Because of transit marketing, public transportation services are tailored to choice riders, that is, people who have another option for transportation.”

The study identified key issues core users face on public transportation, such as poor integration with travel networks, wait times, costs, safety concerns, lack of comfort and transit services failing to meet their needs.

“Based on the experiences documented, we suspect that most if not all study participants would eventually move or switch away from public transit if income permits,” Prayitno said. “This is due to shortcomings of the transit system given their travel needs.”

When riders are lost from transit systems, it adds more cars on roads, contributing further to congestion and carbon emissions, counter to Sustainable Development Goals, the authors explain.

To improve transit equity in Toronto and increase ridership, the researchers recommend a reassessment of travel networks to connect homes of core riders better with the rest of the city. This move includes incorporating an equitable, fair pricing framework based on ability to pay, improved accessibility and safety measures within and around transit stops, and evaluation of the quality of transit service for all members of the public.

The study appears in the Canadian Planning and Policy journal.

The future-ready workforce series: the future of working together

A message from Co-operative and Experiential Education (CEE).

Registration for the next Future-Ready Workforce Series is now open. In this upcoming session, researchers from Waterloo’s Work-Learn Institute (WxL) will highlight recent findings about the importance of social interaction.

You’ll also hear from Industry leaders at Vidyard about their experience developing strong teams and organizational networks in remote and hybrid work settings.

Register now for the next Future-ready workforce series on September 21, 2022 at 1:00 p.m.

Centre for Career Action focus groups and other notes

The Centre for Career Action (CCA) is inviting students to participate in focus groups this September. "We are asking for your feedback and thoughts about CCA services, resources and programming – whether you’ve used them or not," says a note from CCA. "All focus group participants will have $25 added to their WatCard. Learn more and register through the form: https://forms.gle/XJP1vL91YkSmiyz37."

On September 17 from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Renison University College will be hosting the annual One Sky Festival, which brings together performers from across Ontario to share cultural food, fashion, and traditions. This is a free event and all are welcome.

Hamilton’s biggest arts and music festival ‘Supercrawl’ underway downtown

One of Hamilton’s biggest festivals is underway and organizers say they anticipate “huge” numbers for the event which had been cancelled and scaled down during the pandemic.Friday marked a full in-person return for Supercrawl to James Street North with the music stages expected to be the “big draw,” according to Sonic Unyon Records director of operations Lisa La Rocca.“But there are visual artists, th...

One of Hamilton’s biggest festivals is underway and organizers say they anticipate “huge” numbers for the event which had been cancelled and scaled down during the pandemic.

Friday marked a full in-person return for Supercrawl to James Street North with the music stages expected to be the “big draw,” according to Sonic Unyon Records director of operations Lisa La Rocca.

“But there are visual artists, theater performances, fashion vendors, food trucks, all kinds of stuff.”

Prior to the pandemic in 2019, Supercrawl drew more than 250,000 visitors over three days and had an economic impact of more than $20 million, according to Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism.

La Rocca says the hope is to once again achieve similar numbers with their first full-on affair in two years.

“We know this season some festivals have kind of had record attendance. People are excited to get out, especially outdoor events,” La Rocca told 900 CHML’s Good Morning Hamilton.

“People are comfortable, more comfortable coming to outdoor events in huge numbers.”

The co-owner of Sonic Unyon – the label that puts on Supercrawl – is a little more cautious with his assessment of how many will attend the weekend event but says he “feels the energy.”

“We do expect to have some incredible attendance. We’ve got incredible weather ahead of us and an incredible lineup of things for people to do,” Tim Potocic told CHML’s Hamilton Today.

Tim Baker, The Dirty Nil, Hamilton All-Stars, Sarah Harmer, Lido Pimienta and Charlotte Day Wilson are just some of 40-plus performers that will hit the stage during the full return Friday through Sunday at James Street North.

The full musical lineup and can be seen on the Supercrawl website.

Squonk is one highlight of the 2022 edition bringing a “Hand to Hand” jazz production to the family stage with a signature twist – the company has made purple hands each twenty-feet tall. Mounted on wheels, the hands interact with the audience with an opportunity for the audience actually take control the hands themselves.

Steve O’Hearn, co-artistic director of Squonk, says the idea for the hands comes from the multi-fingered appendages ability “to do things in the world.”

He says they are modeled on the bioengineering of the human hand, which has sinews and tendons going up and down each finger.

“So it’s rigged like a sailboat,” said O’Hearn. “All the muscles that operate your fingers are in the body of your hand in the palm, and that’s what makes them work … you stand at the bottom and pull ropes and the fingers move.”

Fashion showcases will include Ark Collective, highlighting BIPOC businesses, and True Hamiltonian who will be launching a ‘Hollywood North’ collection.

The Author’s Tent is on Colbourne Street featuring book signings and readings from local authors.

Food will include not only the local restaurants on James Street but more than 30 food trucks.

The three-day event closes James Street North from King Street West to Strachan Street as well as York Boulevard from Park to Hughson.

Municipal parking includes the York Boulevard Parkade at Vine Street, which has capacity for 770 vehicles with a Saturday rate (in after 6 a.m., out by 6 p.m.) at $12, an evening rate (in after 6 p.m., out by 6 a.m.) at $8 and Sunday all-day flat rate of $8.

Hamilton Street Railway’s MacNab Transit Terminal is located a block west of Supercrawl.

The south end of Supercrawl is two to three blocks northwest of the Hamilton GO Centre and the north end is beside the new West Harbour GO Station and a connection with the Lakeshore West line.

Supercrawl: Hamilton’s Free Music & Arts Festival Returns This Weekend

This multi-arts festival celebrates local talent including visual and media artists, theatre, literature, and performance art.Make sure you check out the musical performances that will be located at stages around the festival. There will be several local artists that you may recognize, as well as a performance by the Hamilton Children’s Choir.2022 artists include Tim Baker, The Dirty Nil, Hamilton All-Stars, Sarah Harmer, Lido P...

This multi-arts festival celebrates local talent including visual and media artists, theatre, literature, and performance art.

Make sure you check out the musical performances that will be located at stages around the festival. There will be several local artists that you may recognize, as well as a performance by the Hamilton Children’s Choir.

2022 artists include Tim Baker, The Dirty Nil, Hamilton All-Stars, Sarah Harmer, Lido Pimienta, and Charlotte Day Wilson. Other musical artists announced today include Altameda, Tynomi Banks, The Barettas, Blind Mule, Breeze, Nuela Charles, Dearly Beloved, Ellevator, Espanola, Fame Cartel, Golden Feather, Sarah Good & The Bads, Hamilton Children’s Choir, Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra Brass Quintet, The Hidden Cameras, Cam Kahin, Shawnee Kish, LOONY, Loviet, Olivia Lunny, Eamon McGrath, Nezqwik, Northern Cree, OMBIIGIZI, Lydia Persaud, Lido Pimienta, Pleasure Craft, Queen Cee with GSSO and Duckai, Amanda Rheaume, Tallies, Julian Taylor, TRP.P, and JJ Wilde.

There will also be a fashion stage where you can check out some of the latest styles, along with some interesting talks.

Take the kids and bring them to the Fun Zone at York Blvd between MacNab & James to keep them entertained during this super fun festival.

This year, kids can also enjoy a Foam Party.

You’ll also want to make sure that you check out the various dance performances. There will be plenty of food vendors located around the festival as well, so you don’t need to worry about going hungry.

This is the perfect event to head to if you’re looking for a fun time with your friends, or if you’re looking for a fun date idea that you and your significant other will always remember. Best of all, admission is free.

Sheld-stable food and hygiene products donations are appreciated.

Supercrawl runs September 9 to 11 and on-street programming hours are 5:30 pm to 1:00 am Friday, 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Saturday, and 12:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Sunday at James Street North in Hamilton.

If you are heading to the festival, street closures will begin Thursday September 8 from 1:00am on James St. N. from King to Wilson/York (Wilson/York remains open on Thursday for east-west traffic), Wilson/York to Cannon (Cannon remains open to westbound traffic), Cannon to Barton (Barton remains open to east-west traffic), and Barton to Strachan (Strachan remains open to east-west traffic).

Additional closures will take place on King William, Rebecca, Vine, Mulberry, Colbourne and Murray Streets. Friday September 9 from 1am, York Blvd/Wilson St. will be closed from Park to Hughson (MacNab will remain open to north/south traffic). York/Wilson will reopen to through traffic on Monday September 12 at 1am. All other road closures will remain in effect until Monday September 12 at 5am.

Where is the best BBQ in Stanislaus County? See who Bee readers picked as their favorite

To find the best barbecue in Stanislaus County, you might have to take a little drive.The county has great BBQ joints throughout its borders, with the Top 5 finishers in The Bee’s online poll spread across Modesto, Turlock, Hughson and Patterson. While the Central Valley may not be as famous for is barbecue as regions like Texas, Memphis and St. Louis, we still have many mouthwatering places to stop for tri-tip, brisket, ribs and pulled pork.But which Stanislaus County barbecue restaurant is your favorite?We asked ...

To find the best barbecue in Stanislaus County, you might have to take a little drive.

The county has great BBQ joints throughout its borders, with the Top 5 finishers in The Bee’s online poll spread across Modesto, Turlock, Hughson and Patterson. While the Central Valley may not be as famous for is barbecue as regions like Texas, Memphis and St. Louis, we still have many mouthwatering places to stop for tri-tip, brisket, ribs and pulled pork.

But which Stanislaus County barbecue restaurant is your favorite?

We asked readers to pick the best, and the decisive winner of our nonscientific poll — which we conduct for fun and bragging rights — is Patterson restaurant Almond Wood.

Opened in the western Stanislaus County city in 2013, the restaurant was introduced under another name — Apricot Wood. Chef and owner Steve Ceron moved to Patterson from his native Las Vegas in 2009. He opened the restaurant Damasco Fine Foods & Spirits, which is since closed, and a few years later started his signature barbecue place.

Ceron specializes in Texas-style barbecue, and smokes his meats low and slow over local apricot, almond and cherry wood. The brisket smokes for 15 hours and the pulled pork for 12 hours in the restaurant’s massive outdoor smoker, which can handle 1,200 pounds of meat at once.

Just follow the smell of smoking meat, and look for the gigantic neon BBQ sign out front, to find the restaurant off Interstate 5, north of Sperry Avenue. The large 12,000-square-foot eatery can seat about 250 and has grown since the pandemic started.

The expansion into the next-door former Pizza Factory space came as the restaurant upgraded its menu and changed its name.

Ceron said the change from Apricot Wood (named after the city’s once-signature crop) to Almond Wood came because of the evolving agricultural landscape of the Valley. With more almond orchards going in, it made sense to rebrand, he said.

“Apricot wood is going extinct in the area, so it made sense to look toward the future,” Ceron said. “The expansion gives us two kitchens now, too, which allows us to be more agile when it comes to serving tables and give a better overall experience.”

Their new menu includes brick oven pizzas and a pasta bar. But it’s the BBQ, and from-scratch approach to the food, that has made the restaurant a favorite of locals and tourists passing through alike. The restaurant is open for lunch and dinner daily, closed on Sundays.

Placing second just under Almond Wood was Turlock’s Big Vic’s BBQ. The former catering business turned brick-and-mortar restaurant from its namesake owner, Victor Rivas, opened amid the pandemic in July 2020. The Golden State Boulevard spot has been attracting new fans and loyal followers since.

The full Top 5 finishers for Best BBQ in Stanislaus County are:

1. Almond Wood, Patterson

2. Big Vic’s BBQ, Turlock

3. Doc’s Q’In Pit Stop, Modesto

4. Slick Fork BBQ, Hughson

5. Divine Swine, Modesto

Congratulations to all the winners, though Central Valley diners may be the real winners with all the tasty BBQ options available.

“It feels good to be loved,” Ceron said. “Through the years, thanks to the restaurant, we’ve met people from San Francisco, Washington, Oregon, Canada and locally from every city — Gustine, Newman, Modesto, Turlock and, of course, Patterson. It’s been great.”

Ceres, most Stanislaus County cities record population losses

Fewer people are calling Ceres home, according to new population estimates released last week by the California Department of Finance.Unlike neighboring Valley cities to the north and south that recorded large population increases over the past year, Ceres lost 376 residents to drop to 48,386. Turlock also saw a decrease – 203 fewer residents to bring Turlock’s population to 71,531, as of Jan. 1, 2022. Ceres’ immediate neighbor, Modesto lost 865 residents to drop to 217,880.Ceres is now the 186th largest city ...

Fewer people are calling Ceres home, according to new population estimates released last week by the California Department of Finance.

Unlike neighboring Valley cities to the north and south that recorded large population increases over the past year, Ceres lost 376 residents to drop to 48,386. Turlock also saw a decrease – 203 fewer residents to bring Turlock’s population to 71,531, as of Jan. 1, 2022. Ceres’ immediate neighbor, Modesto lost 865 residents to drop to 217,880.

Ceres is now the 186th largest city in California out of 1,418 cities and towns.

Stanislaus County as a whole saw a loss of over 2,000 residents in 2021. Merced County, by contrast, was one of the top five counties in California to gain residents.

All Stanislaus County cities recorded population losses, except for Patterson which saw a 2.2 percent increase (531 residents) and Hughson which neither added or lost during the year. Hughson is estimated at a population of 7,495.

Two of the fastest growing cities in the state are located in San Joaquin County — Lathrop (13th largest numerical gain in the state) and Manteca (14th largest gain). In raw population gain, Lathrop added 1,947 residents and 1,864 additional residents now call Manteca home. But given Manteca is roughly three times larger in population, Lathrop’s additional residents translated into a 6.63 percent growth rate as opposed to Manteca’s 2.19 percent growth rate that made it California’s 25th fastest growing city in 2021.

Manteca has consistently been adding between 1,600 and 2,200 residents during the past seven years. Both Lathrop and Manteca are on pace to build more new housing units this year than they did in 2021.

In 2021, only 123 of the state’s 482 cities gained population. California’s population as a whole dipped slightly by 117,552 residents last year, bringing the state’s total to 39,185,605 people as of Jan. 1, 2022. The 0.3-percent decline represents a slowing compared to the 0.59-percent decline over the nine-month period between the April 2020 Census date and the year’s end.

The Northern San Joaquin Valley for the first time in at least two decades, if not longer, saw cities that dropped population as well.

Cities in the three-county Valley region that gained residents and their estimated population as of Jan. 1, 2022 are as follows:

• Tracy added 914 residents to increase to 94,538.

• Merced added 858 residents to increase to 89,058.

• Patterson added 531 residents to increase to 24,370.

• Los Banos added 471 residents to increase to 46,339.

• Lodi added 425 residents to increase to 66,570.

• Livingston added 70 residents to increase to 14,410.

Cities in the three-county Northern San Joaquin Valley region that lost residents and their estimated population as of Jan. 1, 2022 are as follows:

• Oakdale lost 39 residents to drop to 23,071.

• Waterford lost 72 residents to drop to 8,872.

• Escalon lost 77 residents to drop to 7,362.

• Newman lost 82 residents to drop to 12,244.

• Gustine lost 117 residents to drop to 5,981.

• Dos Palos lost 120 residents to drop to 5,715.

• Riverbank lost 152 to drop to 8,340.

• Ripon lost 183 residents to drop to 15,979.

• Turlock lost 203 residents to drop to 71,531.

• Atwater lost 367 residents to drop to 31,652.

• Stockton lost 1,395 residents to drop 322,489.

— Dennis Wyatt contributed to this report.

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