Appliance Repair in Gustine, CA

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Gustine, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Gustine, CA

UC to expand college program to low-income students in Gustine

Sixty low-income high school students in Gustine will soon be eligible for assistance with qualifying for college through UC Merced’s Upward Bound program.The university’s Center for Educational Partnerships recently received a $1.4 million, five year grant from the federal Department of Education to support their work, which will go to expanding the program under a new partnership with the Gustine Unified School District.Upward Bound started in 2007 with the goal of helping students from disadvantaged communities m...

Sixty low-income high school students in Gustine will soon be eligible for assistance with qualifying for college through UC Merced’s Upward Bound program.

The university’s Center for Educational Partnerships recently received a $1.4 million, five year grant from the federal Department of Education to support their work, which will go to expanding the program under a new partnership with the Gustine Unified School District.

Upward Bound started in 2007 with the goal of helping students from disadvantaged communities make the jump to college. The program provides the students with things like after-school tutoring, college visits and a six-week summer academy. It’s designed to address the low rate of college and university-going among students who grow up in poverty and often have to learn English on top of their other studies.

“Projects like Upward Bound are essential to providing students with intensive services that increase their academic and postsecondary readiness and help foster a college-going culture,” said Orquídea Largo, interim associate vice chancellor for student affairs at the CEP, in a recent press release.

The CEP already has a partnership with the Fresno Unified School District, where it operates the Upward Bound program at Hoover High School and Sunnyside High School. In total, the CEP received over $4 million to support the three schools for the next five years.

Upward Bound has helped 327 students from Hoover and Sunnyside over the program’s 15 year lifespan. It maintains an A-G Completion Rate – the share of high school graduates who qualify for a UC or CSU school – of 52 percent and has enrolled 75 percent of its students in some form of post-secondary education. It’s currently working with 72 first-generation, low-income students.

There has been a slow but steady increase in the number of students from low-income backgrounds making it to college. In 1996, about 12 percent of undergraduates in the US were from families who lived in poverty. That number increased to 20 percent by 2016, according to a study by Pew Research, but the jump was mostly limited to community colleges and private for-profit colleges.

The percentage of poor students in the most selective institutions only increased by three percent in the same time frame. By contrast, the percentage of non-white undergraduates increased across all higher education institutions, elite and otherwise, by 20 percentage points from 1996 to 2016.

California is ahead of the rest of the country, however. More low-income students make it to college here than other states, and they make up a larger share of the student body as well, according to the Public Policy Institute of California.

Gustine to address state waiver for recycling program beleaguered with uncertainties

There have been two constant refrains repeated by many in the private and public sector since CalRecycle rolled out their mandate for cities to start separating organic matter in garbage collections – no one really seems to know how it is all going to work and when it comes to what people do know, they’re not happy about it.The City of Gustine can’t do much about how people feel about it, but they are hoping to offer up some clarity when it comes to how the program works and what responsibilities the city and residen...

There have been two constant refrains repeated by many in the private and public sector since CalRecycle rolled out their mandate for cities to start separating organic matter in garbage collections – no one really seems to know how it is all going to work and when it comes to what people do know, they’re not happy about it.

The City of Gustine can’t do much about how people feel about it, but they are hoping to offer up some clarity when it comes to how the program works and what responsibilities the city and residents have in regard to compliance. The City is hosting a community meeting at 6 p.m. Oct. 25in council chambers at City Hall to get an update from hauler Mid Valley Disposal and City staff on the status of the City’s solid waste and recycling program. Discussion will include the effect of the recently issued Senate Bill 1383 waiver to the City of Gustine by the California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery, also known as CalRecycle.

New state-mandated requirements are calling on municipalities to help reduce California’s organic waste by 75% in the next three years. California disposes approximately 30 million tons of waste in landfills each year, of which more than 30 percent, like green waste and food materials, could be used for compost or mulch. Greenhouse gas emissions resulting from the decomposition of organic wastes in landfills have been identified as a significant source of emissions contributing to global climate change.

In 2016, then Governor Jerry Brown signed SB 1383 into law. The legislation requires a 50% reduction from 2014 levels in organic waste going to California landfills by 2020 and a 75% reduction by 2025. It also requires that by 2025 that at least 20 percent of edible food currently sent to landfills instead go for human consumption. The law directs CalRecycle to adopt regulations designed to achieve these targets, reduce methane emissions and support the state’s climate change goals.

Senate Bill 1383 calls on municipalities to help reduce California’s organic waste by splitting out organics from the waste stream by either using a third can strictly for food and green materials or having the waste service separate food and recyclable items from the trash. The regulation will be rolled out gradually for residences and businesses.

Jurisdictions must adopt enforceable ordinances to ensure that all residential and commercial generators are compliant. CalRecycle can assess penalties for noncompliance beginning in 2022 and local jurisdictions beginning in 2024.

The new law included a waiver provision for low population jurisdictions, defined as those with fewer than 7,500 residents that also generate less than 5,000 tons of waste annually. Gustine met both of those requirements and contacted CalRecycle in the fall of 2021 seeking the waiver.

At the time, CalRecycle informed City representatives that Gustine did not qualify for a waiver based on a technicality. Under the State rules, CalRecycle used historical data from 2014 as reported in the CalRecycle Disposal Reporting System for verifying annual waste tonnage eligibility. The Merced County Regional Waste Management Authority, which reports data to that system on behalf of all jurisdictions in Merced County, in 2014 only reported the total generation within the County, and not totals for any one jurisdiction within the County.

Though the City offered proof of individual 2014 tonnage for Gustine, CalRecycle refused to accept that verification because the data was not specifically and originally reported in the 2014 CalRecycle data.

Following denial of the waiver option, the City had no choice but to begin implementation of the new recycling regulations, which began in June 2022. A 3-2 vote by the Gustine City Council previously ended the waste disposal service from Gilton and started up with Mid Valley, which supplied residents and businesses with a third can that is strictly for food and organic waste. It has not only meant a rate increase, but changes of when garbage is collected.

In late August, CalRecycle contacted City staff, and said that the agency had decided to reconsider its prior rejection of Gustine’s request for a waiver of SB 1383. CalRecycle did not elaborate on why it decided to accept the Gustine 2014 tonnage figures outside of its historical reporting system, but CalRecycle allowed numerous other low population cities to submit waivers as well.

Gustine staff quickly submitted its waiver request. CalRecycle notified the City on Oct. 4 that the State accepted the Gustine waiver but did not give any guidance as to what that actually means.

The waiver does not eliminate all recycling requirements. Prior to SB 1383, the State had adopted other related laws that remain in effect. For example, prior legislation mandating that the City implement commercial organic and inorganic recycling still remains, which also carries fines. Additionally, the waiver has a limited lifespan as State regulations currently state a maximum waiver time of five years, unless the State allows extensions, which are also not certain. The State has communicated very clearly that it intends to ultimately require all jurisdictions to comply with requirements of SB 1383 in the future.

The City Council wants to keep the community informed and hear from those utilizing solid waste services in Gustine as it works through the waiver process. If you are unable to attend the meeting in person, you may join online by going online to www.cityofgustine.com, finding the Special meeting agenda and logging in by phone or computer.

Prep football: Judge’s ruling allows Woodland Christian High School’s season to continue

Woodland Christian High School’s football season lives on with a playoff game against visiting Gustine set to kickoff at 7 p.m. Thursday, capping a whirlwind week of uncertainly, confusion and anger.The CIF Sac-Joaquin Section’s governing office on Tuesday ruled the small-school powerhouse was ineligible to continue its season because of a paperwork oversight tied to 11 freshmen players. That ruling was upheld by a CIF appeals committee Wednesday, but Yolo Superior Court Judge Samuel T. McAdam granted a temporary restraini...

Woodland Christian High School’s football season lives on with a playoff game against visiting Gustine set to kickoff at 7 p.m. Thursday, capping a whirlwind week of uncertainly, confusion and anger.

The CIF Sac-Joaquin Section’s governing office on Tuesday ruled the small-school powerhouse was ineligible to continue its season because of a paperwork oversight tied to 11 freshmen players. That ruling was upheld by a CIF appeals committee Wednesday, but Yolo Superior Court Judge Samuel T. McAdam granted a temporary restraining order Thursday allowing the Cardinals to keep playing.

The case is far from over, however, as the CIF still considers all regular-season and any playoff games as forfeits because the paperwork was not filed in time. The issue is rooted in safety, the CIF argued, with 14-year-olds playing varsity football. McAdam said the next hearing on the case is next week.

The 11 freshmen players would have been immediately eligible at the start of the season had the waivers been signed by parents of those student-athletes and the school administration. Players that young are otherwise not allowed to compete in varsity football. Woodland Christian coach Mike Paschke said it was an honest oversight with no intent to deceive the section or opponents. Each of those players submitted proper paperwork over the past two weeks.

McAdam agreed with that stance in his ruling, which was viewed live online by The Sacramento Bee. A point of emphasis was if the 11 freshmen created an unfair advantage. McAdam said he did not think so. The CIF argued that bylaws stipulate proper paperwork must be filed and safety is paramount, and that allowing the temporary restraining order means other schools will seek similar court backing.

Woodland Christian self-reported its oversight to the CIF and followed up with emails to the section office explaining its argument. McAdam said it was a “paperwork failure,” but added the “irreparable harm” to Woodland Christian’s team, school and community was clear and a season forfeiture was excessive.

The CIF could not comment because this is a legal matter.

Woodland Christian players, cheerleaders, family, staffers and even the drumline watched the hearing online in the campus amphitheater.

“Everyone went nuts when we heard the verdict,” Paschke said excitedly. “Tons of tears of joy. I think it was a miracle to see a judge that fast. Winning this ruling today makes us believers. Just because we go to a Christian school doesn’t mean we’re all believers in things like this.”

Pascke said he learned of the appeals committee upholding the CIF’s ruling Wednesday night.

“We all went home, sad, thinking our season was over, and we thought we had a 1% chance to get a court date and maybe that much of a chance to win,” Paschke said. “I feel good for Gustine, too. Their team bus, fan bus, they were all coming. Could you imagine having to tell them to turn around and go home?”

This story was originally published November 10, 2022 3:46 PM.

California Man Claims Meteorite Burned Down His House

A man whose rural home in northern California was burned down has said that the fire was caused by a meteorite hitting the house.Dustin Procita, who owns the property in Penn Valley, evacuated his home at ar...

A man whose rural home in northern California was burned down has said that the fire was caused by a meteorite hitting the house.

Dustin Procita, who owns the property in Penn Valley, evacuated his home at around 7 p.m. local time on November 4 when he noticed the fire, but one of his dogs and three of his wife's pet rabbits were lost in the blaze.

"I heard a big bang," he told KCRA. "I started to smell smoke. I went onto my porch, and it was completely engulfed in flames."

Procita says that the fire was started by the meteorite that fell to Earth around the same time. The fireball was witnessed by many locals and captured on a variety of security and dashboard cameras all the way from Gustine, California, to Grants Pass, Oregon, according to SFGATE.

Meteorite experts are skeptical about this explanation for the fire, as meteorites that hit the ground are not as blazing hot as we might assume.

Jonti Horner, an astrophysics professor at the University of Southern Queensland, Australia, told Newsweek: "Meteorites that make it to the ground at subsonic speeds aren't actually hot when they reach the ground. That's one of the big myths people hold dear about astronomy that just aren't true.

"A meteorite like that coming through the atmosphere is a little bit like what you get when you order some deep-fried ice-cream. You have a lump of rock or metal that is moving through space and has been in space for billions of years. So it will be chilled through to its very center—nice and cold," Horner said.

"As it comes into Earth's atmosphere at high speed (above 12 kilometers [7.5 miles] per second), it pushes the air in front of it, causing that air to become superheated (kind of like a shockwave), which in turn causes the surface of the rock to 'ablate'. Basically, the very surface layer gets super-heated, and vaporised," he added.

"As the thing continues to push through the atmosphere, it gets whittled away from the outside in by this ablation process—until friction with the atmosphere slows it to subsonic speeds," said Horner.

"At that point, you essentially have a rock with a very thin super-heated layer (like the skin of an apple), which then takes tens of seconds or a few minutes to fall the rest of the way to Earth. The interior will still be bitterly cold—but that fall will be plenty of time for the surface to cool off."

When the rock hits the ground, Horner said, it is traveling at terminal velocity, and would be cold to the touch, and rather than glowing hot. It would have water condensed on it, like a box of ice cream, or even frost.

"I'm absolutely certain that this man's house wasn't set on fire by the meteorite—at least, not by the impact of a space rock itself," Horner said. "The only way that I could see it working is if the meteorite came through a window and knocked over a stove with an exposed flame—in the same way that some houses have caught fire in earthquakes in the past, as a result of stoves getting knocked over."

Clayton Thomas, a captain of the Penn Valley Fire Protection District, told SFGATE that he had seen a video recorded by an individual who filmed the meteorite falling as they drove. "When they tried to figure out where it landed, they pulled up to the building that was on fire," he said.

"I see... that people 'saw where the meteor landed and ran to it.' Sadly not possible," Jim Rowe, co-founder of both Fireballs Aotearoa and the UK Fireball Alliance, told Newsweek.

"Meteorites stop glowing 15 to 30 kilometers [9.5 to 18.5 miles] up. But seeing them 'hit the ground' is a really common illusion. The brain is hardwired to think that a fast object must be nearby."

Rowe added: "For decades, people have reported that a meteor fell behind the next hedge, where what they actually saw was 300 kilometers [186 miles] away, so a meteor disappearing behind the horizon but still 20 kilometers [12.5 miles] above the ground, rather than a meteor landing 300 meters [985 feet] away behind a hedge."

Fire captain Thomas said that, while there were no objects "consistent with a meteorite at the scene," the cause of the fire is still under investigation, with other factors such as electric problems or issues with gas service needing to be ruled out.

"Overall? Impossible nonsense," Rowe said. "Even if people did see a fireball, it's impossible to chase one down and go to where it seems to have fallen.

"And if one did fall? Its temperature may have been sub-zero, and it certainly wouldn't have set anything alight. And if it did set anything alight, it would still be there in the ashes for everyone to see because it's a rock, and rocks always survive house fires. But there's no rock."

If a much-larger rock had collided with Earth, there may indeed have been a fire, but it would have created a much-larger blaze than the one that occurred at the house.

Annemarie E. Pickersgill, a meteorite-impact scientist at the University of Glasgow in Scotland, told Newsweek: "When the original asteroid is very big, more than 50 to 100 meters [164 to 328 feet], it is likely to keep most of its speed and survive passage through the atmosphere.

"If the fireball discussed in this article was that energetic, and did indeed hit that house, the house and surroundings would be completely destroyed, not just burnt down, and anyone in the house would not survive."

Alexander Nemchin, a space rock scientist at Curtin University, Australia, agreed. "They can probably cause fires if they are large enough not to be slowed down by the atmosphere. But such pieces would also leave a hole in the ground where you would not be able to find the house or what is left of it," he told Newsweek.

Regardless of the cause of the fire, Dustin Procita and his wife, Jeanette, lost their home and their belongings and pets, and they did not have home insurance. A GoFundMe has been set up to help them find a new home.

Portugal’s president receives warm welcome in Gustine. ‘This will go down in history’

Portugal’s President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa was given an enthusiastic welcome to Gustine on Sunday, where he met with community members and local dignitaries as part of his trip to California.Gustine Mayor Pat Nagy presented Rebelo de Sousa with a key to the city, saying the moment will be remembered for years to come.“This will go down in history, you can believe it,” Nagy told the audience gathered at Gustine Pentecostal Society Portuguese Hall. “You will forever be welcome here, and you will be in ou...

Portugal’s President Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa was given an enthusiastic welcome to Gustine on Sunday, where he met with community members and local dignitaries as part of his trip to California.

Gustine Mayor Pat Nagy presented Rebelo de Sousa with a key to the city, saying the moment will be remembered for years to come.

“This will go down in history, you can believe it,” Nagy told the audience gathered at Gustine Pentecostal Society Portuguese Hall. “You will forever be welcome here, and you will be in our hearts.”

Rebelo de Sousa told the Sun-Star he had planned on coming to Gustine in 2020, but that visit was postponed by the COVID pandemic.

Rebelo de Sousa explained while there are many stops on his trip, when talking about Gustine he said, “But this one is even more special. No other Portuguese president has been here. So many Portuguese have been working here. I had to come.”

He called the United States an ally and “a very old friend,” saying Portuguese Americans remain “resilient” and determined to succeed.

“(The Valley) is a place where Portuguese have been for 150 years,” he told reporters gathered for the event. “It’s a lifetime. Several generations.”

Gustine has one of the highest concentrations of Americans with Portuguese heritage in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Many of those local folks trace their ancestry back to the Azores, as well as Portugal itself.

The city is steeped in Portuguese history and longtime traditions that continue to this day, like its annual festa, which began in the 1930s.

When given the key to the city by Nagy, Rebelo de Sousa joked, “Now I feel like a citizen. I don’t know if you thought about it before offering it ... I feel good here, I may be back several times.”

Rebelo de Sousa presented a merit medal to local dairy farmer Joao Pires while addressing the group in Gustine. Pires, who is originally from Azores, was moved to tears as he accepted the medal.

Gustine Pentecost Society President Manuel Siqueiros said it meant so much to the people of Gustine for Rebelo de Sousa to take the time to visit.

“Just the fact that he recognizes this Portuguese community and to come out here and celebrate this day and express his happiness with the people of Gustine, it’s amazing,” Siqueiros said. “You don’t get a foreign president visiting a lot of places let alone Gustine, California.”

Other scheduled stops on Rebelo de Sousa’s California trip include throwing the first pitch at the San Francisco Giants-Colorado Rockies game Tuesday in celebration of Portuguese Heritage Night.

He was scheduled to appear at Stanford University on Monday for a panel discussion titled “Sustainable Solutions for Portugal and California.”

“(Portugal has) 60% of our energy sources coming from renewable (energy),” Rebelo de Sousa said Sunday, saying that number is expected to increase to 80% by 2030.

He also mentioned Portugal’s efforts to embrace the digital revolution, particularly with many young entrepreneurs spearheading startups and technological innovations.

“(That) is something that makes California and Portugal very much alike. It’s very good,” he said. “We are far away, but we are very close, facing these new challenges. “

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