Appliance Repair in Friant, CA

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Friant, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

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Latest News in Friant, CA

CA Department of Water Resources releases funds for repairs of Friant-Kern Canal

With California now in its third year of drought, collaboration among state, federal and local partners is critical to improving the resiliency of California’s water system. Today, the California Department of Water Resources announced it has released $29.8 million in funding to the Friant Water Authority (FWA) to repair segments of the Friant-Kern Canal, a key water conveyance facility in the San Joaquin Valley damaged by land subsidence.“Through this investment, we are furthering a partnership to restore California&rsquo...

With California now in its third year of drought, collaboration among state, federal and local partners is critical to improving the resiliency of California’s water system. Today, the California Department of Water Resources announced it has released $29.8 million in funding to the Friant Water Authority (FWA) to repair segments of the Friant-Kern Canal, a key water conveyance facility in the San Joaquin Valley damaged by land subsidence.

“Through this investment, we are furthering a partnership to restore California’s major water conveyance systems to improve the resiliency of California’s water supply during drought and flood conditions,” said DWR Director Karla Nemeth. “The projects, when completed, will maximize the canal’s capacity to move water efficiently through the system and improve California’s ability to boost and store its water supply.”

The state-funded program, which aligns with Governor Newsom’s Water Resilience Portfolio to improve water quality and supplies for California, is part of a cooperative approach to fixing California’s water conveyance infrastructure pursued by local, state, and federal agencies, who will financially support the projects.

The Friant-Kern Canal plays a critical role in delivering water to 1 million acres of farmland and more than 250,000 Californians from Fresno to Bakersfield. In January, FWA began the first phase of the Friant-Kern Canal Middle Reach Capacity Correction Project, which will restore carrying capacity along 33 miles of the 152-mile-long canal in eastern Tulare County. The Friant-Kern Canal, owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, has lost more than 60 percent of its original conveyance capacity in the middle section due to land subsidence. Phase one of the project is expected to cost $292 million and be completed by early 2024.

“This funding is a large part of the reason that we were able to break ground on the Friant-Kern Canal Middle Reach Capacity Correction Project in January,” said FWA Chief Executive Officer Jason Phillips. “Our partners at the State of California have invested in the San Joaquin Valley’s future at a critical time, and we are grateful to the Newsom Administration and for DWR’s dedicated efforts to release these funds as quickly as possible in recognition of the urgent need to implement the project.”

The Friant-Kern Canal is one of four projects that will receive funds as part of a $100 million initiative in the California Budget Act of 2021 to improve water conveyance systems in the San Joaquin Valley. DWR is working on agreements for projects on the Delta-Mendota Canal, San Luis Canal, and California Aqueduct.

To receive program funding, participants must show proof of adequate non-state cost share to match the State financial assistance. Program funds will be used to pay for planning, permitting, design, and construction of near-term subsidence rehabilitation projects, such as raising canal embankments or repairing check structures. Agencies with funded projects will need to investigate the risk of subsidence and how to prevent continued subsidence.

An additional $100 million in funding is slated for the coming fiscal year.

Subsidence is a long-term issue for water conveyance systems that has been exacerbated by recent droughts. If not addressed, continued subsidence will further reduce the water delivery capacity of regional canals and aqueducts and increase the costs for remediation.

Friant water officials dismayed over Federal water shuffle

A move by Federal water officials to release water from Friant Dam to accommodate the needs of competing, farm water users is prompting increased worries from Friant Water Authority over its ability to serve disadvantaged communities in the San Joaquin Valley.Last Friday, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced it would begin releasing water from Millerton Lake to assist San Joaquin River Exchange Contractors, those who have contracted with Federal water officials for Sacramento River water in exchange for historic rights to the King...

A move by Federal water officials to release water from Friant Dam to accommodate the needs of competing, farm water users is prompting increased worries from Friant Water Authority over its ability to serve disadvantaged communities in the San Joaquin Valley.

Last Friday, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation announced it would begin releasing water from Millerton Lake to assist San Joaquin River Exchange Contractors, those who have contracted with Federal water officials for Sacramento River water in exchange for historic rights to the Kings and San Joaquin River.

In a statement on Tuesday, the Friant Water Authority – which services the Friant-Kern Canal and a bevy of San Joaquin Valley communities from Madera to southern Kern counties – expressed disappointment at the decision by Federal officials.

“The water released from Friant Dam for the Exchange Contractors would have otherwise been available for delivery to Friant Division contractors in communities stretching from Madera and Chowchilla at the north to as far south as Bakersfield and Arvin in Kern County,” the water agency said in a statement.

They added that the release isn’t a mere triviality.

“The amount of water to be released could be as large as the total water supply needed to meet the needs of Los Angeles for an entire year,” Friant officials said.

They noted that the release could impact the water allocation to the Friant Division’s first class contractors. Federal officials set that allocation at 15 percent earlier in the water year.

“This summer it’s likely that dozens of small and rural or disadvantaged communities on the valley’s eastside will require emergency water supplies as their wells go dry when the aquifers they rely on are not recharged with Friant water,” the agency said.

At the center of the move, Friant alleges, is a legal controversy over how the Federal government is supposed to meet its obligation to the San Joaquin River exchange contractors and whether Federal officials are oversampling Friant water to meet those obligations.

“Nevertheless, the main reason for the need to release water from Friant Dam in the first place is that Delta supplies are increasingly unreliable,” the agency notes.

In their statement, Friant Water officials tendered a broader judgment on a bevy of on-going fronts related to the state’s water situation amid worsening drought.

“One day, Californians will wake up to realize that they didn’t sacrifice farms to save fish – they lost both.”

State releases nearly $30 million to Friant-Kern Canal repairs, holds back $7 million

The California Department of Water Resources hands down millions in light of federal, local funding to fixt the Friant Kern CanalSACRAMENTO – The Friant-Kern Canal has been in distress for several years thanks to severe drought and now requires millions of dollars in repairs.According to a Friant Water Authority (FWA) press release the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) announced it will throw $30 million dollars in funding to assist with repairs.“Through this investment, we are f...

The California Department of Water Resources hands down millions in light of federal, local funding to fixt the Friant Kern Canal

SACRAMENTO – The Friant-Kern Canal has been in distress for several years thanks to severe drought and now requires millions of dollars in repairs.

According to a Friant Water Authority (FWA) press release the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) announced it will throw $30 million dollars in funding to assist with repairs.

“Through this investment, we are furthering a partnership to restore California’s major water conveyance systems to improve the resiliency of California’s water supply during drought and flood conditions,” said DWR Director Karla Nemeth. “The projects, when completed, will maximize the canal’s capacity to move water efficiently through the system and improve California’s ability to boost and store its water supply.”

Specifically, DWR will release $29.8 million from the already approved $39.2 million in the 2021-2022 state budget. This money is going to aid phase 1 of the Friant-Kern Canal Middle Reach Capacity Correction Project that will rehabilitate 33 miles of the canal affected by subsidence. The canal has lost more that 60% of its conveyance capacity from subsidence caused from over pumping groundwater, making repairs even more urgent than before.

Alex Biering, communications director for the Friant Water Authority, explained that the state puts a hold on a small portion of the overall grant. The purpose of this is to essentially ensure that the project is running smoothly. In the case of the FWA, and the remaining $9.4 million, $7.4 million goes to a “hold back” while the remainder goes toward administrative costs.

“[The state] wants to make sure that we’re all still pushing towards those goals of all ships rising together. So they are going to keep that and hold it back as an insurance policy until the project is done, or we get some further movement on the other sources of funding,” Biering explained.

In January 2022, the FWA was able to break ground with the first phase of the project. The Friant-Kern Canal stretches over 100 miles, and supplies water to a million acres of farmland and more than 250,000 Californians. The rehabilitation of this project is no small task. The most impacted area is a damaging 33 miles causing the expected cost of phase 1 to be $292 million.

Several different sources are going to be required to fully fund the project. Under the 2021-22 state budget there is a requirement that funds must come from the local, state and federal levels. Before the state will match any other funds, participants must show proof of funds allocated at the local and federal level.

“We have cobbled together this package of funding and financing that is coming from a lot of different places. There’s funding that is coming from a settlement with Eastern Tule Groundwater Sustainability Agence (GSA), there is financing and funding coming from the federal government, there is funding coming from the canal users directly and Friant contractors, but they don’t all arrive in a big chunk. Some of them are going to take a little longer,” Beiring explained.

DWR Deputy Director Executive Advisor Michael Sabbaghian explained that before the state will match any funds, participants must show proof of funds acquired at the local and federal level.

“Any future funding will be dependent on [Friant Water Authority’s] ability to secure non-State cost share from federal…and local sources. This requirement was applied to the 2021-22 State Budget Act for the first $100 million as well,”Sabbaghian explained.

Regardless of the partial release of funds, FWA Chief Executive Officer Jason Phillips expressed his gratitude for this funding. He explained that this funding was a large reason why they were able to break ground in January.

“Our partners at the state of California have invested in the San Joaquin Valley’s future at a critical time, and we are grateful to the Newsom Administration and for DWR’s dedicated efforts to release these funds as quickly as possible in recognition of the urgent need to implement the project,” Phillips said.

These project funds are spread throughout areas such as planning, permitting, design and the actual construction of subsidence rehabilitation projects. The 2021-22 state budget also authorized an additional $100 million for the 2022-23 fiscal year. Along with other requirements, each agency with a funded project will need to investigate the ever present risk of subsidence and analyze ways it can be prevented.

It seems virtually impossible to completely eliminate subsidence. Beiring explained that they will be implementing different ways to create resilience including moving some areas of the canal and working with local agencies to help monitor overpumping.

California Department of Water Resources Releases Funds for Repairs of the Friant-Kern Canal in the San Joaquin Valley

The Bureau of Reclamation, Friant Water Authority, and California Department of Water Resources celebrate the groundbreaking of a $187 million construction project to restore capacity in a 10-mile portion of the Friant-Kern Canal. USBR PhotoMarch 25, 2022 - SACRAMENTO, Calif. – With California now in its third year of drought, collaboration among state, federal and local partners is critical to improving the resiliency of California’s water system. On Thursday, the California Department of Water Resources announced it has ...

The Bureau of Reclamation, Friant Water Authority, and California Department of Water Resources celebrate the groundbreaking of a $187 million construction project to restore capacity in a 10-mile portion of the Friant-Kern Canal. USBR Photo

March 25, 2022 - SACRAMENTO, Calif. – With California now in its third year of drought, collaboration among state, federal and local partners is critical to improving the resiliency of California’s water system. On Thursday, the California Department of Water Resources announced it has released $29.8 million in funding to the Friant Water Authority (FWA) to repair segments of the Friant-Kern Canal, a key water conveyance facility in the San Joaquin Valley damaged by land subsidence.

“Through this investment, we are furthering a partnership to restore California’s major water conveyance systems to improve the resiliency of California’s water supply during drought and flood conditions,” said DWR Director Karla Nemeth. “The projects, when completed, will maximize the canal’s capacity to move water efficiently through the system and improve California’s ability to boost and store its water supply.”

The state-funded program, which aligns with Governor Newsom’s Water Resilience Portfolio to improve water quality and supplies for California, is part of a cooperative approach to fixing California’s water conveyance infrastructure pursued by local, state, and federal agencies, who will financially support the projects.

The Friant-Kern Canal plays a critical role in delivering water to 1 million acres of farmland and more than 250,000 Californians from Fresno to Bakersfield. In January, FWA began the first phase of the Friant-Kern Canal Middle Reach Capacity Correction Project, which will restore carrying capacity along 33 miles of the 152-mile-long canal in eastern Tulare County. The Friant-Kern Canal, owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, has lost more than 60 percent of its original conveyance capacity in the middle section due to land subsidence. Phase one of the project is expected to cost $292 million and be completed by early 2024.

“This funding is a large part of the reason that we were able to break ground on the Friant-Kern Canal Middle Reach Capacity Correction Project in January,” said FWA Chief Executive Officer Jason Phillips. “Our partners at the State of California have invested in the San Joaquin Valley’s future at a critical time, and we are grateful to the Newsom Administration and for DWR’s dedicated efforts to release these funds as quickly as possible in recognition of the urgent need to implement the project.”

The Friant-Kern Canal is one of four projects that will receive funds as part of a $100 million initiative in the California Budget Act of 2021 to improve water conveyance systems in the San Joaquin Valley. DWR is working on agreements for projects on the Delta-Mendota Canal, San Luis Canal, and California Aqueduct.

To receive program funding, participants must show proof of adequate non-state cost share to match the State financial assistance. Program funds will be used to pay for planning, permitting, design, and construction of near-term subsidence rehabilitation projects, such as raising canal embankments or repairing check structures. Agencies with funded projects will need to investigate the risk of subsidence and how to prevent continued subsidence.

An additional $100 million in funding is slated for the coming fiscal year.

Subsidence is a long-term issue for water conveyance systems that has been exacerbated by recent droughts. If not addressed, continued subsidence will further reduce the water delivery capacity of regional canals and aqueducts and increase the costs for remediation.Source: CA. DWR

Related: Groundbreaking Ceremony Kicks Off Construction Project to Repair Friant-Kern Canal in Central California

More water jitters - No new ag wells for now | John Lindt

Governor Newsom’s new water order requires public agencies like CalTrans and California’s counties and cities to stop watering turf in their area due the the drought — meaning this summer we will be seeing more brown landscape along roads, highways and in public streets including in Tulare and Kings Counties, says water engineer Dennis Keller.The order also puts a hold on new applications for water wells with some exceptions unless the application can be certified by a Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) as to no...

Governor Newsom’s new water order requires public agencies like CalTrans and California’s counties and cities to stop watering turf in their area due the the drought — meaning this summer we will be seeing more brown landscape along roads, highways and in public streets including in Tulare and Kings Counties, says water engineer Dennis Keller.

The order also puts a hold on new applications for water wells with some exceptions unless the application can be certified by a Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA) as to not cause a problem for neighbors. In Tulare County the county can’t issue a permit without permission of the State Board’s Division of Drinking Water. Local County Counsels recently huddled with the state officials to hear the news, says Keller.

Hanford opens door for third dispensary

The City of Hanford has asked staff to process a third cannabis dispensary application to open in town. The application period starts soon extending into June. Mary Beatty, city planner, says a majority on the city council has approved the plan. Already Caliva and HerbN’Joy offer the service in Hanford. Tulare has recently processed three sites in their city as well.

Hanford electrical co wants new digs downtown

Telstar Instruments & Control Systems Integrators wants to build new 10,000sf office on one-acre of vacant land in Downtown at W. Fifth Street, S. Irwin Street, S. Douty Street says City Planner Mary Beatty, She adds that the electronics firm wants to expand and has outgrown their current location. The project requires a General Plan Update to change the zoning, recommended by city staff

The office building will be used for the purchase, sale, and staging of electrical gear for electrical, programming, and construction services. Purchased products are shipped to the office, staged temporarily, and are then taken to the job sites. Some five employees will work out of the office with 38 employees working offsite. This project would serve as a relocation and expansion of the current Telstar office located approximately 200 feet southeast of the project site at 202 S Douty St., Hanford.

Hanford General Fund up 11 Percent

Hanford City Council, by motion, adopted amendments to the 2021-22 Fiscal Year Budgets to provide $678,000 of additional appropriation in the General Fund and Internal Service Funds. Additionally, they add four positions.

Overall actual General Fund revenues are anticipated to increase 11% as compared to budget, representing an approximate 4% increase from the prior year. The City’s highest contributors of revenue are sales tax, property tax- in lieu of vehicle license fee and current year secured property taxes.

Friant Dam water releases

There is uncertainty whether recent requirements by the Bureau of Reclamation to send water down the San Joaquin River for the Exchange Contractors will mean loss of all or some of the 15% water allocation to Friant this year. Hot weather is increasing the flow down the river to perhaps more than the Exchange Contractors can use with cold weather expected by the weekend, slowing the flow, says engineer Dennis Keller. Contractors hope to salvage some of the allocation stored upstream to use to water crops from Friant Kern Canal this summer.

”Right now it’s too early to tell,” says Keller.

Friant released a statement that says, “The water released from Friant Dam for the Exchange Contractors would have otherwise been available for delivery to Friant Division contractors in communities stretching from Madera and Chowchilla at the north to as far south as Bakersfield and Arvin in Kern County.

This summer, it’s likely that dozens of small and rural or disadvantaged communities on the Valley’s eastside will require emergency water supplies as their wells go dry when the aquifers they rely on are not recharged with Friant water. The releases will also eliminate the cold-water pool behind Friant Dam, completely decimating the river’s newly burgeoning Spring run salmon population when it returns this fall to spawn in 70-degree water.”

“And although 2022 is a dry year, poorly designed regulations meant to protect Delta-dependent fish species and our collective inaction to improve water infrastructure in the Central Valley for more than a generation are the underlying problems preventing enough water from being moved through the Delta. One day, Californians will wake up to realize that they didn’t sacrifice farms to save fish – they lost both.”

Warm Temps Close China Peak

Operators of ski resort China Peak above Fresno decided that April 3 would be their “final day.”

“This came sooner than anticipated with the warming forecast and rapid snowmelt”

“Our team has worked hard throughout this entire season to ensure our trails are maintained for our guests' enjoyment and that the mountain remains fun and safe for all. Thank you to our incredible guests, we look forward to seeing you this summer for mountain biking and music."

Cotton Forecast — plantings could rise 10% from California Cotton Growers

April 1,2022: With cotton prices where they are today, it comes as no surprise to see an increase in cotton acreage for 2022. Unfortunately, another year of drought will severely limit the amount of acreage that gets planted this year. As of today, California cotton growers are only increasing their plantings this year by approximately 10% despite record cotton prices. Cotton growers planted approximately 120,000 total acres in 2021 and are looking to plant 132,000 acres in 2022.

According to the preliminary planting intentions survey conducted by the California Cotton Ginners and Growers Association this month, the Association is currently estimating approximately only 107,000 acres of pima, 1,600 acres of Hazera and about 24,000 acres of upland statewide for the 2022 cotton season plus or minus 10%. This survey is based on surveys from all of the gins in California and things could change when planting is actually completed and final field surveys are completed by CDFA. If it plays out, it will represent a 26% increase in pima acreage and a 31% decrease in upland acreage in California as compared to 2021. Again, this is preliminary, but reflects what all gins are reporting

Interest rates top 5%

The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage just crossed to 5% according to Mortgage News Daily. Only a week ago it was closer to 4%. This is the first time it has crossed that 5% threshold since 2011, except 2 days in 2018. It stood at 3.38% one year ago today.

Mortgage rates, which follow loosely the yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury, have been climbing since the start of the year, partially due to the Federal Reserve’s policies to curb inflation as well as the global economic turmoil resulting from the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

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