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Make braised short ribs, then turn the leftovers into pasta sauce

/Make braised short ribs, pasta sauce for Make-Ahead MondayDec. 20, 202105:31Why spend hours upon hours braising dinner to only enjoy it for just one night? Make the most of slow-cooked meat by cooking a big batch and turning the leftovers into a second dish to maximize your re...

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Make braised short ribs, pasta sauce for Make-Ahead Monday

Dec. 20, 202105:31

Why spend hours upon hours braising dinner to only enjoy it for just one night? Make the most of slow-cooked meat by cooking a big batch and turning the leftovers into a second dish to maximize your return on investment. Chef Anne Burrell is joining TODAY to share her go-to short rib recipe and serve it two ways. She shows us how to make slow-braised short ribs in a red wine and tomato sauce paired with mashed potatoes and then turn them into a hearty sauce for a quick pasta dish.

Courtesy Anne Burrell

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Anne Burrell

The key to developing the deep, rich flavor of these short ribs is all in the browning. First, the short ribs themselves get seared to develop a caramelized crust, then the vegetable mixture takes its turn getting deeply golden in the pot, and finally, a healthy heap of tomato paste goes in for a browning session. The result is layers of flavor that infuse every bit of the tender short ribs. Serving this ultra-hearty dish with horseradish-spiked mashed potatoes helps brighten everything up and adds a wonderfully creamy complement to the beef. Tangy, spicy and creamy mashers for the win!

Courtesy Anne Burrell

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Anne Burrell

I love this recipe because it takes leftovers and makes them even better than the original recipe! Tender short ribs and their rich braising sauce get tossed with pasta and Parmesan for an easy and amazingly flavorful dinner.

If you like those make-ahead recipes, you should also try these:

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Anne Burrell

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Valley communities lost water in last drought. Are small water systems ready this time?

Arturo Rodriguez and his colleagues on the Poplar Community Services District board are responsible for keeping clean water flowing to 2,500 residents in the middle of a global pandemic and drought.Of the community’s three wells, two are in production right now, although Rodriguez doesn’t know how long they’ll last through another drought. The other well is inactive because it is contaminated with nitrates. As the aquifer lowers this summer, even if the wells don’t run dry, they run a greater risk of becoming c...

Arturo Rodriguez and his colleagues on the Poplar Community Services District board are responsible for keeping clean water flowing to 2,500 residents in the middle of a global pandemic and drought.

Of the community’s three wells, two are in production right now, although Rodriguez doesn’t know how long they’ll last through another drought. The other well is inactive because it is contaminated with nitrates. As the aquifer lowers this summer, even if the wells don’t run dry, they run a greater risk of becoming contaminated. Water suppliers are often forced to choose between a contaminated well or no running water.

“We’re definitely concerned. Not enough has been done to mitigate the synergistic effects causing overdrafting,” Rodriguez said.

The aquifer becomes overdrafted as more people pump groundwater during droughts, when water from snowmelt and rivers isn’t available.

Poplar is one of hundreds of small community water systems in the central San Joaquin Valley facing severe challenges in the task of providing residents with safe and reliable drinking water, particularly during drought. Some 360,000 people are at risk, according to a drought-risk analysis by DWR.

Water systems were caught off guard in the last drought, leaving tens of thousands of people at risk of imminent water shortages.

“It was surprising, the number of water systems that would call us up at 4:30 on a Friday afternoon and say, ‘I’m sucking air’ and ‘I don’t know why my well quit’,” Darrin Polhemus, deputy director of the Division of Drinking Water at the State Water Board, said at a drought preparedness meeting.

“Many vulnerable small water systems did not monitor their well levels or report reservoir levels above intake until emergency situations overtook them,” he said.

Whether water districts are better prepared to deal with this drought is yet to be seen. Following extensive reviews of water shortages in the last drought and an analysis of the multiple risks facing small water suppliers, the state is better prepared this year to respond to emergency situations. And, to prevent a last-minute scramble to secure water service this year, state officials may require water districts to report their well levels every few weeks.

Still, that doesn’t mean water shortages won’t happen.

State lawmakers and advocates are pushing for legislation that would require those districts to create drought preparation plans, like those that larger water systems have in cities. Even if passed, it wouldn’t take effect until next year. That might be too late.

Small water districts face unique challenges to delivering safe water to their customers: most rely on groundwater, which is vulnerable to decline during droughts. Those that rely on surface water face smaller allocations. Small staff sizes make it difficult to anticipate and prevent emergency situations before they arise. And backup supplies are hard to come by for many.

Groundwater, and even surface water delivered through the large canals of California, is often contaminated, and many small water systems serving lower-income communities can’t afford to install costly water treatment systems.

In the last drought, more than 150 small water systems needed emergency assistance, according to PPIC research.

In its 2020 analysis of more than 2,400 smaller water systems, the state’s Department of Water Resources categorized the relative risk of 293 small water systems in the central San Joaquin Valley during drought.

Small water systems with the highest risk are those that are located in a fractured rock area (typically in the foothills), are located in a high wildfire risk zone, rely on groundwater, and have no ability to easily receive imported water, besides trucking it in.

Water districts were given a score between 1-100 to assess relative risk. The score takes into account backup water supplies, groundwater levels, wildfire risk, technical and staff capacity of the district, climate, and whether the district is located above fractured rock, among other considerations.

A score of zero doesn’t mean there isn’t risk, say DWR officials.

“There’s no place in the state free from drought risk,” said Arthur Hinojosa, with DWR’s Division of Regional Assistance at the April meeting of the State Water Resources Control Board.

In the central San Joaquin Valley, 87 percent of small water districts rely fully on groundwater. The remaining systems get their water from local streams and rivers, or imported through the California Aqueduct or the Friant-Kern Canal.

In a May 2021 report, the Legislative Analyst Office noted that the majority of the state’s funding for drought response in 2012-2015 went to long-term water supply projects, but many of those have not yet been completed.

Since then, the legislature adopted the SAFER program, allocating billions of additional dollars to improve water reliability in the state’s most disadvantaged communities. And, Gov. Gavin Newsom has proposed an additional $5.1 billion over the next four years for water infrastructure and drought response.

Those solutions include funding for small water districts to consolidate with nearby larger water districts that have more stability; or, building new backup wells. But these projects take several years to design, permit and build.

Legislators also passed the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act in 2015, which calls for local water agencies to bring groundwater basins into balance so water levels won’t continue to decline. But, the goals are long-term and experts at the Public Policy Institute of California anticipate that communities in the valley who rely on shallow wells will still be left high and dry.

In times of water shortages, many small water districts do not have easy access to a backup water supply.

Recent research by the State Water Board found that across California, more than 1,000 water systems which rely on groundwater do not have access to a backup well.

Poplar’s backup well is contaminated with nitrates which makes it unsafe for drinking. During the last drought, after the other well failed, the community had to rely on contaminated water to keep the taps flowing.

They’ve been trying for nine years to dig a new well. They’ve got several millions dollars to drill it, but have been struggling to find a reliable engineer and operator to finish the project, said Rodriguez.

The last drought left Orange Cove and other communities who rely on water stored in Millerton Lake scrambling at the last minute.

Communities which rely on river water, delivered through canals, often pay exorbitant prices for emergency water, as scarcity drives up the cost.

They and the communities of Lindsay, Strathmore, and Terra Bella — all along the Friant-Kern Canal — secured a last minute deal for “health and safety water” held in groundwater banking facilities owned by Fresno Irrigation District in 2014. But Strathmore nearly didn’t take the water, which they use to blend with groundwater, making it safe to drink, because of the high cost.

Conservation measures during the last drought were helpful for some districts to get through tough times.

“Water meters saved us in the last drought,” said Andy Valencia, chief plant operator with the City of Orange Cove. “Our water demands have dropped over 30 percent since 2015.”

Larger valley cities including Fresno, Clovis, and Visalia have also reported large reductions in water demand since the last drought. Many of those water-savings habits have stuck for a lot of people, making it difficult to achieve the same types of savings for this drought.

“We never removed our water restrictions from the last drought,” said Rodriguez, in Poplar. They encourage the community to comply voluntarily. “We can’t be punitive. I don’t have the staff to enforce restrictions, much less the will. We have water meters, but nobody is around to read them.”

Already struggling with a $20,000 late-fee debt from the water shutoff moratorium due to the pandemic, Poplar is very cautious about placing an additional financial burden on the predominantly Filipino and Latino farmworker community reeling from the pandemic.

Rodriguez says he’d rather see more incentives for Poplar’s residents to convert their lawns to drought-tolerant landscaping, than impose additional restrictions and fines.

SB 552, proposed by State Sen. Majority Leader Bob Hertzberg (D-Van Nuys) would require all systems with less than 3,000 connections to submit emergency drought response plans to the state. It would also require counties, many of whom already oversee several small water districts, to create a local process for drought preparedness.

The bill also addresses a major challenge for small districts: they’d be required to develop monitoring systems to detect water shortages before they become emergencies.

In California, water systems with more than 3,000 connections are required by law to prepare an Urban Water Management Plan, including a section on drought-contingency planning. Smaller systems are not.

The bill is intended to create a more equitable process of allocating scarce resources during drought emergencies, where emergency water often goes to the highest bidder or more politically-connected districts.

“During the last drought, when community residents needed emergency resources the most, local and state governments were still deciding which agencies were responsible,” said Jonathan Nelson, policy director with Community Water Center.

“Planning isn’t bureaucracy,” Hertzberg said. “It helps avoid exploitation.”

The bill, if passed, wouldn’t go into effect until 2022.

For some vulnerable small systems, this summer may bring water trucks and bottled water deliveries to get by, if wells stop operating or surface water deliveries are cut.

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s May 10 drought emergency spending proposal included $27 million for emergency and permanent drought relief, including bottled water deliveries and water trucks.

The Legislative Analysts’ Office recommends that the legislature ask state agencies to start reaching out to small water suppliers now, to anticipate emergency water needs before they materialize — and focus limited resources on rural, predominantly Latino communities that faced the most water risk during the last drought.

“At the end of the day, a drought crisis is a human crisis,” explained Nelson. “We must seize this moment to make proactive drought resiliency efforts to break the cycle of having to scramble in every drought as thousands of Californians lose access to their primary water supply, disproportionately impacting low-income and rural communities of color.”

Staff writer Monica Vaughan contributed to this story.

This story was originally published May 26, 2021 5:00 AM.

Scott Burrell loved being bullied by Michael Jordan

Because of Michael Jordan’s harsh and demanding treatment of teammates in “The Last Dance,” some now see the NBA legend differently. But Scott Burrell — Jordan’s punching bag throughout the Bulls’ 1997-98 season — never considered Jordan to be a bully.“I never took it as him being cruel or him being evil. People talk junk to each other playing basketba...

Because of Michael Jordan’s harsh and demanding treatment of teammates in “The Last Dance,” some now see the NBA legend differently. But Scott Burrell — Jordan’s punching bag throughout the Bulls’ 1997-98 season — never considered Jordan to be a bully.

“I never took it as him being cruel or him being evil. People talk junk to each other playing basketball all the time,” Burrell told USA Today Sports. “He never physically touched me. So he said some words. Why should words hurt me? I’m an adult. I’m learning every time I step on the court. I’m being pushed like I’ve never been pushed before. I needed that.”

In the ESPN production, Jordan calls Burrell “talented,” but “what Scottie was lacking was a commitment, a determination and a seriousness.”

Jordan has reasoned throughout the first eight episodes that less-talented, less-experienced teammates needed to face pressure from the world’s greatest player in practice. If not, he asked, how could they be ready for what they would face in the playoffs?

“I just hope people don’t look at MJ as a tyrant and was too tough on people,” said Burrell, now a coach at Southern Connecticut State. “The majority of people that played with MJ benefited from playing with MJ. Whether it’s new contracts or new deals as coaches, everyone has benefited somehow. I don’t know if I would be a head coach if I didn’t play with Michael.”

Burrell has been able to laugh, while watching Jordan embarrass him in front of the world — even the 1998 scene from the team plane in which Jordan jokingly calls Burrell “an alcoholic” for his late night partying, prompting the former Connecticut star to tell the cameras to stop rolling because his family would see it.

“Every story is like a fish tale. You catch a two-inch fish. But by the end of the story, it’s a shark,” Burrell said, laughing. “I was a young 27-year-old guy. I enjoyed life. But I never got in trouble and never partied too much. I had fun just like everybody else would do.

“[My family] laugh[s] when he rides me just like I do. They know deep down inside that MJ likes me. I know MJ likes me. They know he challenged me every day. Who doesn’t like challenges? Well, some people don’t. That’s their prerogative, but I do.”

Jordan, who infamously punched teammates Steve Kerr and Will Perdue during their playing days, revealed he tried to get Burrell to fight him, too, but declared that Burrell was too nice to ever come close to trading blows.

Burrell nearly earned some revenge when he lost a one-one-on game to Jordan, 7-6, who then refused a rematch.

“Why? So you can tell everybody you beat Michael Jordan? What am I going to say? I beat Scott Burrell?” Jordan said.

Burrell then backed down despite believing a controversial foul call allowed the MVP to win.

“You got to know when to stop with MJ,” Burrell said. “If you don’t stop, it’s going to go on to the bus and it’s going to go on to the plane. So you have to know when to stop with him. Or else it’s going to be relentless.”

They spent one season together. Jordan retired for a second time in 1998. Burrell then went to the Nets, forever the owner of a championship ring.

“I had every right to ask for a trade if I thought it was too hard. I have every right to quit in life like some people would’ve done. But how does that make me a better person and a better player?” Burrell said. “I’ve loved seeing every time he speaks hows precise he is and how direct he is with what fires him up. I love it. I told him I’m ready to play now.”

Food Network TV series to determine top chef at new Vegas restaurant

The head chef of the new, $10-million steakhouse opening this spring on the Las Vegas Strip won’t have to interview for the position. He or she will have to beat seven other chefs in televised cook-offs to win the job.The chefs will rumble for the top job at Bugsy & Meyer’s Steakhouse, a Prohibition-themed restaurant opening at ...

The head chef of the new, $10-million steakhouse opening this spring on the Las Vegas Strip won’t have to interview for the position. He or she will have to beat seven other chefs in televised cook-offs to win the job.

The chefs will rumble for the top job at Bugsy & Meyer’s Steakhouse, a Prohibition-themed restaurant opening at Flamingo Las Vegas, in “Vegas Chef Prizefight,” a Food Network series that premieres Thursday.

During each episode, host Anne Burrell will lead the eight chefs into different restaurant kitchens within the Caesars portfolio during a busy dinner service. There, they’ll have to take over and prove they have the chops to run a high-profile Vegas restaurant.

Restaurant expert Scott Conant, Caesars Entertainment regional president Eileen Moore Johnson and surprise guests will be there too, choosing which contestants move forward in the competition.

Besides eavesdropping on the usual interpersonal dramas, the series allows viewers to peek inside the kitchens of popular Vegas restaurants, whose fluorescent lights and clanging pans look nothing like the plush dining rooms and lounges just beyond the swinging kitchen doors.

“The stakes are incredibly high in ‘Vegas Chef Prizefight,’” said Courtney White, president of Food Network. “Winning this show will literally change someone’s life, so there are real consequences.”

The six-episode series kicks off inside Caesars’ test kitchen, followed by a back-of-house takeover of BLT Steak at Bally’s Las Vegas. Subsequent episodes take viewers inside Guy Fieri’s El Burro Borracho at Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino; behind the scenes at Caesars Palace’s Mr. Chow with owner Maximillian Chow; and backstage at Cromwell’s Giada restaurant with Lish Steiling, Giada De Laurentiis’ head of culinary operations.

The real treat for viewers, though, is a backstage pass into the kitchen at Restaurant Guy Savoy, the Michelin-starred French jewel of Caesars Palace. The series wraps up with a 90-minute finale on April 9 when the winner is offered the top toque job at Bugsy & Meyer’s.

Bugsy & Meyer’s isn’t the only restaurant with an executive chef hired through a television cooking show.

The head chef position at BLT Steak at Bally’s Las Vegas went to the winner of “Hell’s Kitchen” Season 15. The winner of that show’s 17th season scored a $250,000-a-year job as the opening chef of Gordon Ramsay’s Hell’s Kitchen restaurant at Caesars Palace, which debuted in 2018.

Burrell and Conant may be the most familiar names in “Vegas Chef Prizefight,” which recently wrapped filming in Vegas.

Burrell, an accomplished chef, hosted Food Network’s “Worst Cooks in America” and “Chef Wanted” shows, where she put hapless cooks and top-notch chefs through culinary wringers. Conant, another Food Network veteran, won acclaim for his cooking at a number of restaurants, including Scarpetta at Montage Beverly Hills, which closed in 2016.

Despite Southern California’s deep talent pool, though, don’t look for any Southland chefs among Prizefight’s contenders. Instead, the contestants were plucked from Auburn. Ala. (Jeffrey Compton); Bridgeport, Conn. (Roshara Sanders); Chicago (Julia Helton, Lamar Moore); Denver (Juan Zepeda); Detroit (Brittney Brown); New York City (Janey Lyu); and Tempe, Ariz. (Jeff Kraus).

2017-18 Track and Field Roster

•Gold Medalist at the Athletics World Cup – 4x100-meter Relay •2018 NACAC Championships Bronze Medalist – 100-meter Dash (USA) •2018 USATF Outdoor Championship Qualifier – 100-meter Dash •2018 NCAA Champion – 100-meter Dash •2018 NCAA Champion – 4x100-meter Relay •2018 NCAA First Team All-American – 100m, 4x100m Relay, 4x400m Relay ...

Gold Medalist at the Athletics World Cup – 4x100-meter Relay 2018 NACAC Championships Bronze Medalist – 100-meter Dash (USA) 2018 USATF Outdoor Championship Qualifier – 100-meter Dash 2018 NCAA Champion – 100-meter Dash 2018 NCAA Champion – 4x100-meter Relay 2018 NCAA First Team All-American – 100m, 4x100m Relay, 4x400m Relay NCAA Record Holder – 4x100-meter Relay (38.17) School Record Holder – 4x100-meter Relay (38.17) School Record Holder – 4x400-meter Relay (3:01.82) 2018 American Outdoor Champion – 4x100-meter Relay 2018 American Outdoor Silver Medalist – 100-meter Dash 2018 American Outdoor Bronze Medalist – 200-meter Dash 2018 First Team All-American Athletic Conference – Outdoor 4x100-meter Relay 2018 Second Team All-American Athletic Conference – Outdoor 100m Dash 2018 Third Team All-American Athletic Conference – Outdoor 200m Dash • NCAA Champion - 4x100-meter Relay • School Record Holder - 60m • School Record Holder - 100m • School Record Holder - 4x100m Relay • 2017 NCAA Championship Silver Medalist - 100m • 2017 NCAA Championship Silver Medalist - 60m • 2017 NCAA All-American - 4x100-meter Relay, 100m (Outdoor)- • 2017 NCAA All-American - 60m (Indoor) • 2017 USATF Outdoor Championship Qualifier - 100m • 2016 NCAA Championship Silver Medalist - 60m • 2016 NCAA First Team All-American - 60m • 2016 NCAA Indoor Qualifier - 60m • 2016 American Conference Indoor Champion - 60m • 2016 First Team All-American Athletic Conference - 60m • 2014 NCAA Outdoor Championship Qualifier - 200m, 4x100m • 2014 NCAA Regional Qualifier - 100m, 200m, long jump, 4x100m • 2014 American Conference Outdoor Champion - 4x100m • 2014 All-American Conference Team (Outdoor) - 100m, 200m, 4x100m • 2014 Indoor First Team All-American - 60m • 2014 NCAA Indoor Championship Qualifier - 60m • 2014 All-American Conference Team (Indoor) - 60m • The American Track Athlete of the Week - Jan. 31, 2017 • The American Track Athlete of the Week - Jan. 17, 2017 • The American Field Athlete of the Week - Dec. 13, 2017 • The American Track Athlete of the Week - Jan. 19, 2016 • The American Track Athlete of the Week - Jan. 28, 2014 • The American Track Athlete of the Week - Dec. 16, 2014

Indoor Date
60m 6.48* 3.12.16
200m 20.84 2.25.17
Long Jump 7.56m (24-9.75) 1.30.15
100m 9.93* 6.9.17
200m 20.75 5.15.16
Long Jump 25-7.25 (7.80m) 5.15.16

2017-18 (Redshirt Senior) Outdoor: Claimed Houston’s first individual title on the outdoor slate since Sam Jefferson in 1994 and won the Cougars’ sixth 100-meter dash national championship in program history, when he ran 10.13 at the NCAA Championships in June…Finished 1-and-2 with teammate Elijah Hall in the event, becoming just the second duo from the same team to accomplish that feat in NCAA history…Opened the NCAA Championships with an NCAA, championship meet and school record in the 4x100-meter relay, anchoring the squad to a time of 38.17 to secure its second-consecutive NCAA Championship…Claimed First Team All-American honors in each of the 100m and 4x100-meter relays, as well as the 4x400-meter relay, where the team finished fifth…Won the American Athletic Conference Championship in the 4x100-meter relay, while taking silver in the 100-meter dash and bronze in the 200-meter dash earning First Team, Second Team, and Third Team All-American Athletic Conference honors, respectively…Helped the Cougars earn a pair of Penn Wheels at the 2018 Penn Relays, taking the 4x100-meter relay in 38.95, while setting the school record in the 4x400-meter relay in 3:01.82 to claim the Cougars first Penn title in the event.

2016-17 (Senior) Indoor: Finished as the NCAA Runner-Up at the NCAA Championships in the 60-meter dash after crossing the line in 6.48...Earned NCAA First Team All-American honors for his effort at the NCAA Championships...Won the American Athletic Conference Championship in the indoor 60-meter dash after finishing in 6.57 on Feb. 29.

Outdoor:Anchored the Cougars' NCAA Championship win in the 4x100-meter relay en route to setting a school record in the event after running 38.34...Broke his father, Leroy Burrell's, record in the 100-meter dash when he ran 9.93 en route to a silver medal finish at the NCAA Championships on June 9...Earned First Team All-America honors in the 4x100-meter relay and 100-meter dash...Helped the Cougars win the American Athletic Conference Championship in the 4x100-meter relay while taking silver in the 100-meter dash at the meet.

2015-16 (Junior) Indoor: Finished as the runner up at the NCAA Indoor Championships in the 60m dash where he ran a school-record 6.48 and fell by just one one-hundredth of a second...Earned First Team All-American honors for his performance at the NCAA Championships...Claimed gold in the 60m dash at the American Athletic Conference Indoor Championships where he ran 6.57 to earn First Team All-American Athletic Conference honors...Won the long jump with a season best leap of 7.56m (24'9.75") at the Houston Invitational & Multi's...Won the 60m dash at the Leonard Hilton Memorial Invitational in 6.55...Opened the 2016 indoor season with a second place finish in the 60m dash after running 6.70 at the Texas A&M Reveille Invitational

Outdoor: Clocked 10.33 into a headwind to take fourth in the invitational portion of the 100-meter dash at the Texas Relays...Opened outdoor competition running in the 4x100-meter relay at the UTSA Invitational where his squad took first in 39.86

2014-15 (Sophomore) Indoor: Competed in seven meets for Houston this season...Won the 60m dash at the Tyson Invitational in 6.60...Jumped a season best 7.30m (23-11.5) in the long jump at the Howie Ryan Invitational...Ran an altitude converted 21.28 in the 200m dash at the New Mexico Lobo Collegiate Open...Clocked the eighth fastest time in the 60m dash at the Houston Indoor opener when he crossed the line in 6.65 seconds.

Outdoor: Redshirted

2013-14 (Freshman) Indoor: Has won the 60m dash in all but one meet this season... broke the school record, set by teammate LeShon Collins earlier in the season, with a time 6.55 to win the New Mexico Cherry & Silver Collegiate Invitational... Represented Houston at the 2014 NCAA Division I Indoor Championships... Finished sixth in the finals of the 60m dash... Named UTSFCCCA First Team All-American, first student-athlete in school history to receive First Team All-America Honors in that event... Finished second behind teammate Collins at the inaugural American Athletic Conference Indoor Championships in the 60m (6.69) and fourth in the 200m (21.64)... Ranked No. 3 in the nation by USTFCCCA.

Outdoor: Qualified for the NCAA National Championships in the 200m and as the anchor leg of the 4x100m relay... Helped the men's 4x100m relay team to the first American Athletic Conference Outdoor Championship... Was awarded All-American Athletic Conference team for the 100m, 200m and 4x100m... Took second place in the 200m at the prestigious Penn Relays... Ran a 20.78 in the 200m to punch his ticket to nationals... Held the fastest times of the season in the 100m and 200m.

HIGH SCHOOL Reigning Texas 4A State Champion in the 100m... Placed third in the 200m at the 2012 Texas 4A State Track and Field Championships... Won gold at the 2012 USATF Youth National Championships in the 100m & Long Jump... First-place finisher at the 2012 AAU National Junior Olympics Championship in the 100m... International experience as a member of two National Teams, in which he holds two goals medals in relay events...Named National Scholastic Athletics Foundation Athlete of the Week (Jan. 21, 2013)... Was the Boy's Co-Track Athlete of the Meet at the Carl Lewis High School Invitational... Ran a personal best of 6.69 in the 60m... Named Outstanding Track Athlete of the Meet at the Texas A&M High School Classic... Son of Cougar Track and Field great and current Head Coach Leroy Burrell.

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