Appliance Repair in Biola, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

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Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Biola, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Biola, CA

Press Release: Velena Jones Joins NBC Bay Area News Team

SAN JOSE, CA – May 31, 2022 – NBC Bay Area / KNTV announced today that Emmy Award-winning journalist and Bay Area native Velena Jones has joined the station as a reporter covering Oakland and the East Bay. She will report for NBC Bay Area’s weekday newscasts.“We are pleased to welcome Velena back to Northern California and to NBC Bay Area,” said Stephanie Adrouny, Vice President of News for NBC B...

SAN JOSE, CA – May 31, 2022 – NBC Bay Area / KNTV announced today that Emmy Award-winning journalist and Bay Area native Velena Jones has joined the station as a reporter covering Oakland and the East Bay. She will report for NBC Bay Area’s weekday newscasts.

“We are pleased to welcome Velena back to Northern California and to NBC Bay Area,” said Stephanie Adrouny, Vice President of News for NBC Bay Area. “Velena has deep local roots and is an accomplished and versatile journalist. Her experience and connection to the community will further enhance the depth of our roster of talented anchors and reporters. I am confident that viewers will appreciate the knowledge and enthusiasm she brings to the station.”

Jones joins KNTV from KVOR-TV (CBS) in Sacramento, where she has worked since 2020, serving as reporter and fill-in anchor. Before KOVR, she spent two years as a reporter and fill-in anchor at KOIN-TV (CBS) in Portland, OR. Previously, Jones served as a reporter and fill-in anchor at WISC-TV (CBS) in Madison, WI, for four years and is a recipient of a Midwest Regional Emmy Award for her role in the coverage of the Tony Robinson shooting in Madison in 2015. Prior to joining WISC, Jones was an anchor, reporter, and news director for WBKB-TV (CBS/ABC/FOX) in Alpena, MI.

Jones returns to her East Bay roots, as she was raised in Concord and graduated from Berean Christian High School in Walnut Creek. She earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Broadcast Journalism from Biola University.

ABOUT NBC BAY AREA / KNTV

Owned by NBC Universal, NBC Bay Area / KNTV is the Bay Area’s investigative station located in the heart of Silicon Valley. The station is committed to providing continuous, in-depth journalism with unique personalities. Along with broadcasting NBC’s award-winning daytime, prime-time and late-night programming, NBC Bay Area produces more than 32 hours of news programming each week. NBC Bay Area / KNTV can be seen locally on Comcast channel 3 / 703 HD, and over-the-air on channel 11. COZI TV, the station’s digital network, offers a full schedule of America’s most beloved and iconic television series, hit movies and original programming. COZI TV can be seen locally on Comcast 186, Verizon 460, and over-the-air on 11.3.

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Liza Catalan408-234-9540liza.catalan@nbcuni.com

Southern Baptist Convention in Anaheim approves resolutions designed to fight sex abuse

ANAHEIM —More than 8,000 members of the Southern Baptist Convention on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to take action to stem a sexual abuse scandal that has stunned members and caused rifts within the largest Protestant denomination in America.Pastor Bruce Frank of the Biltmore Church in Arden, N.C., called it a “kairos” moment — a providential time to act.“Either we humble ourselves before God, or God will humble us,” he said, addressing delegates before the vote in a chilly conference ...

ANAHEIM —

More than 8,000 members of the Southern Baptist Convention on Tuesday voted overwhelmingly to take action to stem a sexual abuse scandal that has stunned members and caused rifts within the largest Protestant denomination in America.

Pastor Bruce Frank of the Biltmore Church in Arden, N.C., called it a “kairos” moment — a providential time to act.

“Either we humble ourselves before God, or God will humble us,” he said, addressing delegates before the vote in a chilly conference room in Anaheim. “This is a seminal moment where we will choose between humility and hubris.”

Frank is the chair of the Sexual Abuse Task Force, established at the 2021 Southern Baptist Convention meeting to study how to respond to widespread reports that allegations of sexual abuse were ignored or covered up for nearly 20 years by senior members of the group’s executive committee.

An explosive 288-page report commissioned by the SBC and released last month describes how leaders disregarded survivors’ reports of abuse, appeared more concerned with protecting abusers than victims and denigrated survivors as “opportunists,” while making the avoidance of legal liability by the SBC the top priority.

Frank said the task force spent thousands of hours reading reports, speaking with survivors and deciding on the best course of action.

“Most of all, we want to say thank you to the survivors,” he said. “Thank you for your patience, your persistence, your grace and resolve. You are the heroes in this room.”

The vote on sex abuse was the most pressing item on the convention’s agenda, causing some to predict that the gathering would be the most consequential, and potentially contentious, in years.

The task force proposed two recommendations that were up for a vote Tuesday. The first was to create another task force to implement sexual abuse initiatives. The second was the creation of a “Ministry Check” website that would list credibly accused offenders associated with SBC churches, in order to prevent abusers from easily moving to other congregations.

There was some debate about the two motions. Those who spoke against the recommendations included Mark Coppenger, former president of Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, who questioned how widespread the abuse was and why he should pay for the sins of a hypothetical church down the street.

Tim Overton, pastor of Kingston Avenue Baptist Church in Anderson, Ind., said the report was tainted because the independent third-party group that conducted it, Guidepost Solutions, tweeted this month in support of LGBTQ people. Southern Baptists overwhelmingly believe that sex is permissible only between a man and a woman in marriage.

“This is a group celebrating sexual sin,” Overton said.

He asked that the resolutions be tabled for a year. Some audience members gasped audibly at the suggestion.

Brad Eubank, pastor at Petal First Baptist Church in Mississippi and an abuse survivor, spoke on behalf of the recommendations.

“Please, let’s start the healing process today,” he said.

The vote was cast by yellow ballots that delegates to the convention, known as messengers, held aloft. There was no question which side won. When SBC President Ed Litton announced that the recommendations had passed, the room erupted in applause, and several delegates stood.

Another topic discussed during the first day of the two-day convention was whether Orange County’s Saddleback Church should remain in the conference after ordaining three female pastors. No decision was reached.

Saddleback, founded by pastor Rick Warren, is the largest church in the convention, but in 2000 the SBC stated that only men could be pastors.

The SBC also voted to pass a resolution that it would declare as reprehensible atrocities conducted against Native Americans in the name of religious conversions, and would stand against forced conversions. The resolution was brought to the floor by Mike Keahbone, a Cherokee who serves as senior pastor at Cherokee Hills Baptist Church in Oklahoma City.

Dwight McKissic, senior pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas, who is Black, brought up a motion to remove the names of slaveholders from buildings and endowed chairs at Southern Baptist seminaries.

Observers say the SBC is at a crossroads. The top two men who were running for president of the group offered different visions of its future. Bart Barber, pastor of First Baptist Church of Farmersville, Texas, represents what some called a “big tent” vision for Southern Baptists, while the more conservative Tom Ascol represents a more by-the-book — meaning the Bible — approach to decision-making.

After a runoff vote late in the day, Barber was elected president, with just over 60%.

“Hallelujah! I’m so happy,” cried a man leaving the convention center after the vote.

The SBC’s roots are in the Southeast, and this is the first time in 41 years that California has hosted the annual meeting. California is home to roughly 2,500 Southern Baptist churches and far more diverse congregations than other states. For example, only 25% of the Southern Baptist churches near Anaheim have services in English.

Lyman Alexander, the retired director of missions for the East Bay Baptist Assn., who worked with 140 churches, said that despite the tensions, the convention felt pretty normal to him.

“There are always people on different sides of the issues,” he said. “That’s usually how they go.”

Biola prays over invasion in Ukraine, where the university has trained pastors for 15 years

Biola University, a small Christian university in La Mirada, has been training pastors for the past 15 years in Eastern Europe — or, more specifically, in Ukraine where Biola has a small extension tied in with a larger Ukraine school.That’s why this week’s Russian invasion is hitting home for many of its staff.“I was shocked,” said Eric Oldenberg, program administrator for faculty development online education and strategic partnership for Biola, during a Friday, Feb. 25 telephone interview. Oldenbe...

Biola University, a small Christian university in La Mirada, has been training pastors for the past 15 years in Eastern Europe — or, more specifically, in Ukraine where Biola has a small extension tied in with a larger Ukraine school.

That’s why this week’s Russian invasion is hitting home for many of its staff.

“I was shocked,” said Eric Oldenberg, program administrator for faculty development online education and strategic partnership for Biola, during a Friday, Feb. 25 telephone interview. Oldenberg works with students in Ukraine on logistics

“There was deep sadness because I have friends, colleagues, and partners all across the country,” said Oldenberg, who lived in Ukraine from 2004-16, said. “And so every time I read about a town being attacked and I knew someone there then I was heartbroken for the threat they were facing.”

The Talbot School of Theology – Kyiv extension at the Kyiv Theological Seminary opened in 2007 and typically includes about 30 students each semester. It produces students who go into some kind of leadership ministry capacity, said Mark Saucy, dean of the extension.

The invasion is disrupting the students’ lives.

“They’re in different states,” he said. “They’re either fleeing trying to leave Kyiv to go into western parts of the country itself or are staying and waiting for what’s to come.”

He added: “It’s a crisis time. I don’t think anyone is working on their theology papers.”

Biola isn’t going to penalize students for dropping a class or missing an assignment, he said..

In an emailed statement via Biola, Ruslan Khmyz, president of Kyiv Theological Seminary, said his school moved to an online delivery format a month ago so that education can continue in spite of war, and so that students can serve their families and communities.

“Rockets are bombing the cities and villages of Ukraine. Russian tanks and soldiers kill people on the streets,” he said. “Russian planes and helicopters are firing on Kyiv. Houses and neighborhoods are destroyed.”

An hour-long prayer time was held in person on campus and on Zoom Thursday. About 30 people came in person and another 110 watched on Zoom.

“We want to uphold them in prayer tonight,” Clint Arnold, Biola’s dean for its Talbot School of Theology at the prayer event.

“They’re our brothers and sisters,” Arnold said “We’re grieving with those who grieve tonight and we hurt with those who are hurting. We want to pray for their families, we want to pray for their lives, we want to pray for their protection, we want to pray for peace, we want to pray for a cessation of hostilities, we want to pray for this to end this bloodshed and this nonsense that’s taking place right now.”

Azusa Pacific University Names Dr. Adam J. Morris as 18th President

Adam J. Morris, PhD, a nationally recognized and accomplished senior administrator and lifelong advocate for Christian higher education, will become the 18th president of Azusa Pacific University on July 1, 2022.The Board of Trustees unanimously selected Morris from an impressive pool of candidates, citing his distinguished 30-year career in higher education marked by visionary leadership, stellar strategic planning skills, and significant ad...

Adam J. Morris, PhD, a nationally recognized and accomplished senior administrator and lifelong advocate for Christian higher education, will become the 18th president of Azusa Pacific University on July 1, 2022.

The Board of Trustees unanimously selected Morris from an impressive pool of candidates, citing his distinguished 30-year career in higher education marked by visionary leadership, stellar strategic planning skills, and significant advancement expertise that have fueled organizational transformation and innovation and brought hundreds of millions of dollars in support of institutional endeavors. His appointment follows a comprehensive, nationwide search by a Presidential Search Committee that included trustees, faculty, staff, and administrators.

Morris currently serves as Executive Vice President, Chief Transformation Officer, and Chief Institutional Advancement Officer at Biola University. As Chief Transformation Officer, Morris drives institutional strategy, implements change, enhances mission effectiveness, and strengthens organizational efficiency and financial stability. As Chief Institutional Advancement Officer, he oversees all university-wide fundraising initiatives, and the Alumni and Parent Relations programs. The Enrollment Division, University Analytics, and the Center for Marriage and Relationships also report to Morris. Since joining Biola in 1990, he has held numerous advancement positions with increasing levels of leadership.

APU’s Board of Trustees chair, Tom Miller, praised Morris’ wealth of experience, demonstrated leadership, and unmatched commitment and devotion to Christian higher education. “Dr. Morris is a uniquely gifted man of God who will bring both his Christ-centered vision for higher education and his transformational mindset to APU at a critically important turning point in this university’s history. His vast leadership, academic, financial, and relational expertise, along with a deep passion for and total commitment to our mission, are game changers for APU,” said Miller. “Strategically focused on the critical needs of our students, informed by deep analytics and the higher education marketplace, Dr. Morris will lead this God First university in a powerful and forward-thinking manner that fulfills our mission to cultivate disciples and scholars ready to impact the world for Christ.”

Morris expressed excitement about joining Azusa Pacific University, with its vibrant 123-year legacy of Christ-centered higher education. “The call from God to join the APU community could not have been stronger and I am both humbled and honored to be invited to assume this sacred position of leadership,” said Morris. “APU has a long and rich history of faithfulness to mission so needed in today’s culture and an incredible academic reputation. The strength and vision of APU’s faculty, staff, and students will lead the way and I look forward to what God will accomplish in us and through us in the months and years to come.”

“Nine months ago, we embarked on the comprehensive work of identifying the next president of Azusa Pacific University,” said Lucie Moore, chair of the 14-member Presidential Search Committee. “Dr. Morris embodies the spiritual and intellectual qualities that define APU and will be a champion of APU’s mission. He not only has an extraordinary record in fundraising, but he also has a deep understanding of finance and the challenges facing higher education. I could not be more pleased with who God called to be the next president of Azusa Pacific University.”

Morris graduated from Biola University with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. He earned a Master of Arts in Theology and PhD in Christian Education from Talbot School of Theology. He has consulted with numerous other private colleges and universities and parachurch organizations and has enjoyed serving on several nonprofit boards.

Morris lives in La Habra Heights, California, with his wife, Faith, and has four adult children, two in-law children, and four grandchildren.

Azusa Pacific University is an evangelical, Christian university committed to God First and excellence in higher education. With 69 bachelor’s degrees, 47 master’s degrees, 18 certificates, 8 credentials, and 9 doctoral programs, the university offers its more than 8,000 students a quality education on campus, online, and at seven regional locations throughout Southern California.

Local Scene: Back to Blues; academic honors; watering restrictions

Gavilan music faculty take the stageGavilan College will host the Bach to Blues concert on March 19 at 7:30pm at the Gavilan College Theater, 5055 Santa Teresa Blvd. in Gilroy.The concert will feature performances by the college’s music faculty as well as special guests.Tickets are $15 general and $10 for students and seniors. All proceeds benefit the Gavilan College Music Program.For information, visit gavilan.edu/bach...

Gavilan music faculty take the stage

Gavilan College will host the Bach to Blues concert on March 19 at 7:30pm at the Gavilan College Theater, 5055 Santa Teresa Blvd. in Gilroy.

The concert will feature performances by the college’s music faculty as well as special guests.

Tickets are $15 general and $10 for students and seniors. All proceeds benefit the Gavilan College Music Program.

For information, visit gavilan.edu/bachtoblues.

Locals named to Stanislaus State Dean’s List

Morgan Hill residents Julie Diaz and Marissa Hruby were among more than 3,000 students to be named to Stanislaus State’s Fall 2021 Dean’s List.

To qualify, students must earn a GPA of 3.5 or higher and register for and earn a minimum of 12 units of credit of graded coursework at the university.

California State University, Stanislaus serves a student body of more than 10,000 at two locations in the Central Valley.

Pyke makes Honor Roll

Natasha Pyke, of Morgan Hill, has been named to the University of Wyoming Provost’s Honor Roll for the fall 2021 semester.

The Provost’s Honor Roll consists of undergraduates who have completed at least six but fewer than 12 hours with a minimum 3.5 grade-point average for the semester.

The University of Wyoming provides quality undergraduate and graduate programs to 12,249 students from all 50 states and 88 countries, says a press release from the university. Established in 1886, UW is a nationally recognized research institution with accomplished faculty and world-class facilities. Offering 200 areas of study, UW provides an environment for success.

Irrigation restrictions

While local water customers are commended for cutting back, the City of Morgan Hill remains in a Level 2 water shortage. As such, starting March 1 through Oct. 31, typical lawn and garden bed sprinkler irrigation is limited to two days per week, says a press release from city staff.

Effective March 1, lawn and garden bed sprinkler irrigation is now limited to:

– Mondays and Thursdays for ODD numbered addresses and properties with no address.

– Tuesdays and Fridays for EVEN numbered addresses.

– Irrigation shall only be scheduled before 9am or after 7pm.

– Prevent runoff in any watering cycle.

– Each valve or zone shall run for a maximum of 15 minutes in any single day.

For businesses, limits now exist on automatically serving water at restaurants, hotels offering guests the option to decline daily linen service, and construction sites using non-potable water for most site activities.

In addition, the following also apply, according to city staff:

– Restrictions cover all potable water in the Morgan Hill city limits, including water from private wells.

– The washing of vehicles is allowed with the use of a hand-held bucket or similar container or a hand-held hose equipped with a positive self-closing water shutoff nozzle or device.

If you have any additional questions, email environ@morganhill.ca.gov or call at 408.310.4169.

MH residents named to Biola Dean’s List

Kelsey Orlando (majoring in Psychology), Hannah Ruffner (majoring in Bible, Theology and Ministry) and Gabrielle Stieg (majoring in Psychology), all of Morgan Hill, were named to the Biola University Dean’s list for the fall 2021 semester.

Biola students are placed on the dean’s list to honor those with a GPA of 3.6 or higher while enrolled in 12 or more credits and whose cumulative GPA is at least 3.2, says a press release from Biola University.

“Inclusion in Biola University’s Dean’s List is reserved for students who demonstrate exceptional performance in their academic studies. This honor signifies hard work, engagement and investment in scholarship,” said Tamara Anderson, Associate Provost of Academic Effectiveness and Administration. “These attributes are the building blocks of continued success, not only in the classroom but in the workplace and in the students’ personal lives. We celebrate these students and their achievement, and look forward to their future accomplishments.”

Biola is offering their largest scholarships ever this semester, where every student is eligible for up to $21,000 in scholarship funds. To learn more details about this and other incentives, biola.edu/giveaways.

Garfias initiated into Phi Kappa Ph

Jindy Garfias, of Morgan Hill, California, was recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest and most selective all-discipline collegiate honor society. Garfias was initiated at The University of New Mexico.

Garfias is among approximately 25,000 students, faculty, professional staff and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation only and requires nomination and approval by a chapter, says a press release. Only the top 10% of seniors and 7.5% of juniors are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10% of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction.

Art a La Carte returns

After a gap of two years, Art a La Carte, everyone’s favorite free arts-and-crafts event for children aged 2-10 years, will take place at the outdoor amphitheater of the Morgan Hill Community and Cultural Center (17000 Monterey Road), from 10am to 2pm April 23.

This year’s inspirational and thought-provoking theme is “Be the Change you Want to See in the World,” attributed to Gandhi. “Motivating us to have the courage and strength to initiate change in the world and make it a better place instead of waiting around for it to happen, this hopeful, action-oriented and positive theme is perfect for our times,” says a statement from Morgan Hill Library, Culture and Arts Commissioner Suman Ganapathy.

As always, local businesses and organizations will host booths with theme-related, hands-on arts and crafts projects, and provide all materials and supplies during the event. Additionally, the CalFire truck, police educational car, Splash the Dolphin, an hour-long cultural program by our local talent and many more fun features will enhance an enjoyable and educational family outing.

Art a La Carte is presented by the LCAC, Morgan Hill Community Foundation and the City of Morgan Hill.

Scouts establish new troop for girls

Boy Scouts of America Troop 730 is expanding its scouting program to include a partner troop for girls in scouting, Troop 2730. Girls may now join BSA, go camping, earn merit badges and achieve scouting’s most-coveted award—the prestigious rank of Eagle Scout.

Scouting activities include camping, hiking, rafting, first aid, knots, STEM, teamwork, leadership and local community service, says the announcement from BSA Troop 730. Boys and girls will be members of separate troops and will join together for combined activities in service, scouting and fun.

To celebrate and introduce the creation of this new troop, Troops 2730 and 730 will have an open house and informational event from 7:30-8:30pm March 23 at the Masonic Center, 380 West Dunne Ave. in Morgan Hill. All boys, girls, and families who are interested in the local scouting program are invited to attend to learn more about the troops and to explore what scouting has to offer.

The troop especially encourages girls in grade 5 and up to check out the open house and the opportunity to be founding members, according to the announcement. Visit the troop’s website at https://www.troopwebhost.org/Troop730MorganHill/ for more information or email BSA2730MH@gmail.com.

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