Appliance Repair in Auberry, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

Whether you need washer repair, stove repair, or anything in between, our process is simple and streamlined:

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Schedule your service call

We work with your busy schedule to get you the service you need.

Technician Diagnoses
Technician Diagnoses

Your factory-trained technician will travel to your location and diagnose your appliance problem.

Quote & Repair
Quote & Repair

We'll itemize the time and parts necessary to get your appliance back in action and get it repaired ASAP.

We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Auberry, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Auberry, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

  • Over 50 Years of Combined Appliance Repair Experience
  • Quick Service and Effective Results
  • Warranties on Parts and Labor
  • Friendly, Helpful Customer Service
  • Licensed & Insured Work
  • Vetted, Tested, Factory Trained Technicians
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  • Mobile Service. We Come Right to Your Front Door!

Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Auberry, CA

LPG Spotlight: Mountain Flame Propane

When a wildfire’s route changed course and moved toward a residential community, Mountain Flame Propane stayed present, even amidst evacuations.On Sept. 4, 2020, a fire began to ignite in the town of Big Creek, California. The area is known for fires and is “somewhat remote,” explains Jason Rinker, co-owner and vice president of Mountain Flame Propane, which serves mostly residential customers in the Sierra Nevada foothills.The fire...

When a wildfire’s route changed course and moved toward a residential community, Mountain Flame Propane stayed present, even amidst evacuations.

On Sept. 4, 2020, a fire began to ignite in the town of Big Creek, California. The area is known for fires and is “somewhat remote,” explains Jason Rinker, co-owner and vice president of Mountain Flame Propane, which serves mostly residential customers in the Sierra Nevada foothills.

The fire – which eventually became known as Creek Fire – was expected to move north into the Huntington Lake area, a hub for summer homes with many of its residents having already left for the season. Generally, the community expected a “normal” fire, Rinker says.

“Then, the wind shifted and pushed it south,” he says. “It moved into the Shaver Lake area within a day or two. That then started causing mandatory evacuations and a massive fire response.”

At that point, as the fire moved south toward the company’s headquarters in Auberry, California, residents had to evacuate quickly. In a typical wildfire evacuation, customers would call the propane retailer for basic instructions on how to turn off their propane tanks and prepare them for the fire. This time, however, Mountain Flame Propane received almost no customer calls due to the haste of the evacuation, Rinker says.

The fire destroyed 856 buildings, he says, estimating that about 350 of his customers’ homes burned down. Despite it all, Mountain Flame Propane remained open. In fact, with its headquarters needing to evacuate, the retailer established a remote office location so that it could remain present throughout the fire.

Mountain Flame Propane worked closely with the local fire department, which set up a command center at a local high school. If needed, Mountain Flame Propane staff helped firefighters with incident management, mitigating flaring propane tanks and open gas lines.

When the fire was under control, Mountain Flame Propane assisted in the clean-up process regarding propane tanks. The fire department trained the retailer’s staff on fire and safety tips and how to wear the required fire-resistant gear. The goal then was to inspect all propane tanks where the fire went through, determine the severity of the damage and pull all hazardous tanks.

Rinker and his brother, Ryan Rinker, who co-owns Mountain Flame Propane, developed a digital reporting app, where users could track each tank, take photos of the serial numbers and GPS the location so that team members could identify which tanks were visually inspected and deemed a hazard.

The retailer also helped lead tank-tagging efforts to determine which tanks needed to be removed and replaced. A green ribbon tied to a tank indicated it had little-to-no damage from the fire. Conversely, a red ribbon signaled damage that needed to be prioritized in pickups.

The fire ultimately burned nearly 380,000 acres and was not announced as 100 percent contained until Dec. 24.

Rinker encourages other retailers to contact their local fire departments to learn how to respond to fires that cause mass evacuations. In addition, enduring the fire has brought the community together, he says, and Mountain Flame Propane is proud to have been part of that, deeming the efforts “a labor of love.”

Year founded // 2002 Founders // Steve, Jason & Ryan Rinker Owners // Jason & Ryan Rinker Headquarters // Auberry, California Employees // 17 Bobtails // 4

Auberry area ordered to evacuate

FRESNO COUNTY, Calif. (FOX26 NEWS) — The Fresno County Sheriff's Office has issued a Mandatory Evacuation Order for the Auberry area.The evacuation order is for all residents living in the area bounded by Auberry Rd to Powerhouse Rd, Hwy 168, Lodge and Little Sandy Roads.This includes the points next to Prather & next to Cressman's General Store.Cal Fire Public Information Officer Edwin Zuniga says the Creek Fire is still spreading rapidly, feasting on dead trees and energized by high heat and strong winds....

FRESNO COUNTY, Calif. (FOX26 NEWS) — The Fresno County Sheriff's Office has issued a Mandatory Evacuation Order for the Auberry area.

The evacuation order is for all residents living in the area bounded by Auberry Rd to Powerhouse Rd, Hwy 168, Lodge and Little Sandy Roads.

This includes the points next to Prather & next to Cressman's General Store.

Cal Fire Public Information Officer Edwin Zuniga says the Creek Fire is still spreading rapidly, feasting on dead trees and energized by high heat and strong winds.

"We have erratic winds that blow in all different directions, so we can't really tell which way it's going to travel. This fire could potentially grow out in all directions," explained Zuniga.

It’s the speed and ferocity of this fire that’s forced more and more evacuations.

As firefighters battle down the creek fire, other agencies are struggling with another problem: convincing people to evacuate.

Homeowner Mike Perrin says a officer knocked on his door in Auberry and told him the fire could be on his doorstep in as little as two hours.

"They told me it's time to leave, and I said okay," said Perrin.

As they were packing up to leave, we asked the Peugh family what their had been like since receiving the evacuation notice.

"Hell. We've been trying to scramble and get all the necessities and sentimental stuff just in case."

But not everyone is taking this seriously. Homeowner Don Lyon says that he will not be leaving the area.

"My wife and her daughter and her boyfriend, they're leaving. I'm not," said Lyon.

"You can't really see the fire around here, so we aren't really in that much danger."

Law enforcement and firefighters say that mentality 'not accepting how quickly things can become dangerous' can be deadly.

"Those warnings are very real. If you get a warning, it is very likely we will evacuate.. when it gets the point where we're giving you the order, it's too late for you to get ready," says Fresno County Sheriff's Lt. Brandon Pursell.

Evacuations and other emergency information regarding the Creek Fire as of 8 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 7.

CREEK FIRE EVACUATIONS:

EVACUATION WARNINGS:

Vehicle exit routes

Base camp

All fire and law enforcement personnel are currently working out of a command post established at Sierra High School, 33326 Lodge Rd, Tollhouse, CA 93667.

Animal evacuations

Evacuation site

Donations

Mark yourselves safe

Traveling through California’s Grapevine on Sunday? What to know about the big storm

This story has been updated. Click here for the latest updates on Fresno’s winter weather forecast this week.Original story below:Anyone finishing off the holiday weekend with a trip home through the Sierra foothills might want to start early as snow levels could drop to 2,000 feet and forecasters say higher elevations could get hammered with up to a foot of snow. Sunday evening.The National Weathe...

This story has been updated. Click here for the latest updates on Fresno’s winter weather forecast this week.

Original story below:

Anyone finishing off the holiday weekend with a trip home through the Sierra foothills might want to start early as snow levels could drop to 2,000 feet and forecasters say higher elevations could get hammered with up to a foot of snow. Sunday evening.

The National Weather Service in Hanford cautioned that travel could be nearly impossible during a storm that is expected to roll in between 4 and 6 p.m.

“The next system will be coming in this afternoon, so we went ahead and issued a winter storm warning for the foothills, and we’ve been carrying a winter storm warning for the higher levels of the Sierra,” said Jeff Barlow, senior meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

“That’s going to start today at 4 o’clock, so we have a little break here to catch our breath and then we have this next system coming in (Sunday night) and pretty much lasting through most of the day (Monday). We’re seeing potentially eight to 16 inches of snow, and the lower amounts will be in the lower elevations, but we’re looking at snow levels to get down potentially to as low as 2,000 feet, and that would include Auberry, Oakhurst, and Three Rivers, and some of the lower-elevations communities in the foothills.”

At the higher elevations above 6,000 feet, the storm could bring two to four feet of snow.

“It’s another big one coming in (Sunday night),” Barlow said.

Travel could be impacted through the Grapevine and Tehachapi Pass, and a winter weather advisory has been issued, though the storm is not expected to impact the south valley until early Monday morning, around 4 a.m.

“With tonight’s system, we’ll see a little more snow with this one down in the south,” Barlow said. “But we’ve been in collaboration with Cal Trans, and they’re ready, they’re prepared.

“They have all the trucks and the plows. We’re making sure because it is such a high-impact travel day with a lot of people heading home with the Christmas holiday. We’ve been working very close with them to make sure the Grapevine stays open, but tomorrow morning will be interesting because a lot of people in the foothills are going to wake up to a nice, fresh dusting of snow. The storm that’s moving in tonight, this is going to be another pretty high-impact event, especially in the lower communities.”

There was an outside chance that Fresno could see a mix of rain and snow on Tuesday, but the snowflakes at least are unlikely with the snow level not expected to dip below 1,500 feet.

This story was originally published December 26, 2021 10:00 AM.

Fresno and Madera County tribes get housing help for COVID relief. Here are their plans

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Over $2 million in federal housing grants is being awarded to two American Indian tribes in the foothills above the central San Joaquin Valley to help alleviate COVID-19 impacts.

The money will help Mono tribal members at rancherias in eastern Fresno and Madera counties. Big Sandy Rancheria in Auberry, and the North Fork Rancheria of Mono Indians in North Fork, are each being awarded an Indian Community Development Block Grant via the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development totaling a little over $1 million.

It’s part of the American Rescue Plan that President Joe Biden signed in 2021, which promised $750 million in HUD dollars to help American Indian tribes during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The federal agency administering the grants announced Tuesday evening that Big Sandy Rancheria will use their new $1,027,890 grant to purchase land that includes three buildings with 14,300 square feet of space that will provide medical services to families impacted by COVID-19. HUD said North Fork Rancheria will use their $1,035,000 grant to acquire three homes that will help alleviate the housing shortage.

HUD said these grants to tribes are meant to “help protect the health and safety of their communities, particularly low- and moderate-income individuals and families, by expanding access to safe housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunities.”

Nearly $12 million was awarded to 11 Native American tribes in California – $83 million to 74 tribes in all across the country – under this third round of grant funding.

The news follows $74 million in these grants being awarded in November, and $52 million in December.

The American Rescue Plan promises $280 million in these grants. That leaves $71 million still to be awarded. HUD said future awards will be announced on a rolling basis.

That’s in addition to $450 million in different HUD grants, Indian Housing Block Grants, that were awarded last year.

American Indians have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. One study published last year found that Native Americans were dying from the virus at substantially higher rates than other groups before vaccines became widely available.

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