Appliance Repair in Auberry, CA

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At Appliance Service Plus, we're passionate about providing personalized services and helpful advice with a friendly smile. We believe our commitment to quality distinguishes us from the crowd. When your appliances fail, we're here when you need us the most.

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We support all major brands and appliances, handling extended service warranty agreements for Lowe's, Home Depot, and other major brands. When you contact us, we strive to provide an engaging, positive experience. It all begins with a friendly smile from our office staff and hard work from our licensed and insured technicians.

Here are just a few of the most common appliance problems we solve every day:

Your Top Choice for Expert Appliance Repair in Auberry, CA

Whatever appliance repair issue you're stressed over, there's no problem too big or small for our team to handle. At Appliance Service Plus, we offer a total package of quality service, fair prices, friendly customer service, and effective fixes. Unlike some appliance companies in Auberry, our technicians are trained rigorously and undergo extensive background checks. We work with all major appliances and are capable of GE appliance repair, Maytag appliance repair, Frigidaire appliance repair, and more.

New and repeat customers choose Appliance Repair Plus because we offer:

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Whether you need an emergency repair for your clothes washer or need routine maintenance for your dishwasher, we're here to exceed your expectations - no if's, and's, or but's.

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Latest News in Auberry, CA

Victims sought after 81-year-old Auberry man arrested

AUBERRY, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – The Fresno County Sheriff’s Office’s Sex Crimes Unit has arrested an 81-year-old man accused of sexually abusing a minor.Detectives say the Auberry man has held many positions in the community that would have allowed him to be near children. Now, they’re asking for other potential victims to come forward.“We arrested David Nehrin...

AUBERRY, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) – The Fresno County Sheriff’s Office’s Sex Crimes Unit has arrested an 81-year-old man accused of sexually abusing a minor.

Detectives say the Auberry man has held many positions in the community that would have allowed him to be near children. Now, they’re asking for other potential victims to come forward.

“We arrested David Nehring back on September 8th. He spent a little less than a half day in jail and then he bonded out,” said Fresno County Sheriff’s spokesperson, Tony Botti.

Nehring is facing charges for sodomy with a minor. Officials are trying to get the word out about the case because they think there may be other victims.

“You got to look at the fact that this guy is 81 years old, so I highly doubt that he just started this behavior last year. There might be a long track record, some victims that are grown adults now,” said Botti.

The Sheriff’s Office says over the years, the suspect has held many positions in the community where he would have interacted with children.

“Such as Auberry volunteer firefighter, he was engaged with the Boy Scouts and also affiliated with the Sandy Bluffs Alternative Education Center,” said Botti, adding that he also attended a Mormon church in Prather. “It was the Mormon church that reported the information to us and we’re very grateful that they were involved in their community,” he adds.

As detectives wait for other potential victims to come forward, Botti also addresses some of the challenges in a case like this, including the statute of limitations.

“How much time has passed, how old is our victim now? But those are bridges that we can cross once we get the information. So, the important thing is to report it. We’ll do the math and figure out and see,” he said.

Officials are reminding parents to have a conversation with their kids about speaking up when something feels wrong.

“Talk about things that might be making you feel uncomfortable. Let a trusted adult know so that things don’t go too far,” said Botti.

Nehring is expected to appear in court next month.

Fire Act approved by Senate, would boost wildfire response

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- When it's hot, dry, windy, and there's an extreme fire risk in California, help could be on the way before destruction.The Fire Act, which was unanimously passed by the U.S. Senate, would allow FEMA to be deployed when a region is prone to disastrous wildfires."Just as we do with other types of disasters, let's get resources and personnel in position to either try to minimize the scale of a disaster," said Sen. Alex Padilla. "But certainly to be able to respond more quickly."T...

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) -- When it's hot, dry, windy, and there's an extreme fire risk in California, help could be on the way before destruction.

The Fire Act, which was unanimously passed by the U.S. Senate, would allow FEMA to be deployed when a region is prone to disastrous wildfires.

"Just as we do with other types of disasters, let's get resources and personnel in position to either try to minimize the scale of a disaster," said Sen. Alex Padilla. "But certainly to be able to respond more quickly."

The proactive wildfire response would be similar to the way FEMA arrives on the scene before a hurricane or tornado. Resources would be sent during times of high wildfire risk and red flag warnings.

Senator Padilla brought the bill forward, which he says would improve relocation assistance, ensure communities are rebuilt more quickly and provide tribal governments with help too.

Fresno County supervisor Nathan Magsig represents many local mountain and foothills communities that have seen fire destruction in recent years. He says this bill could be a game changer.

"You could have infrastructure, pipes that remelted. And so with this, it takes a look at, you know, what it is going to take to restore areas so infrastructure could go back in the ground," said Magsig. "So people can rebuild a home again because properties and areas have to be cleared environmentally."

Ron and Rose Cates were among the first to rebuild their home on Auberry Rd. after it burned in the Creek Fire.

"Having FEMA on the ground faster would definitely help," said Ron.

In the process, their claim for financial assistance was denied by FEMA. They didn't want to wait around for months for the agency to help them clear their property.

"Instead of waiting for FEMA to help us clean up, which would have taken another 2-3 months to come and get that done, we contracted privately and got the process going much quicker for our rebuild that way," said Ron.

The couple is now celebrating one year in their newly rebuilt home, but they had to dip into retirement money to make it happen.

"There are people still suffering out there that are still displaced that are still hurting," said Ron. "It's a multi-year effort for people to rebuild."

Fork Fire is at least 4th wildfire in a week in Madera-Fresno foothills. Here’s the latest

At least four new wildfires have broken out since the start September in the foothills and mountains east of Fresno and Madera, according to Cal Fire.The region has been spared so far this year of a huge fire like the 380,000-acre Creek Fire in 2020, but the smaller ones still have Cal Fire firefighters working on suppression.The newest significant fire began Wednesday afternoon near North Fork, Cal Fire said. The...

At least four new wildfires have broken out since the start September in the foothills and mountains east of Fresno and Madera, according to Cal Fire.

The region has been spared so far this year of a huge fire like the 380,000-acre Creek Fire in 2020, but the smaller ones still have Cal Fire firefighters working on suppression.

The newest significant fire began Wednesday afternoon near North Fork, Cal Fire said. The Fork Fire burned about 773 acres overnight and was just 5% contained as of Thursday morning.

Its proximity to about 400 structures, including homes, led the Madera County Sheriff’s Office to issue evacuation orders.

The blaze started near where Road 222 and North Fork Road meet south of the community of North Fork.

Four firefighters were treated for heat-related injuries fighting the Power Fire in Fresno County, a Cal Fire said.

The wildfire, located about 10 miles south of the Fork Fire area and north of Auberry, was 130 acres and 65% contained on Thursday morning, Cal Fire said. The cause of the fire that began about 3:15 p.m. Tuesday is still under investigation.

No evacuations have been ordered there though there were warnings. The areas impacted included Powerhouse Road from a quarter mile north of Wish I Ah Road to the Fresno-Madera county line. The north, east, and west borders are the San Joaquin River.

The Goat and Nutmeg fires were relatively small, each at 5 acres or less.

A wildfire started Saturday morning on Goat Mountain at Bass Lake before being quickly contained by Cal Fire.

The Goat Fire was reported about 8:35 a.m. on the Sierra National Forest land. It’s not clear what started it.

To the east of the Bass Lake/North Fork area, the Nutmeg Fire broke out Friday afternoon in Blue Canyon, southeast of Shaver Lake, and sent U.S. Forest Service fire crews scrambling to the area with heavy equipment.

The fire response team covered the perimeter with fire retardant early on in the blaze, officials said.

Both of those fires have been contained.

Fork Fire update: Madera County wildfire in North Fork grows, latest evacuation orders

An eastern Madera County wildfire that prompted many evacuation orders burned 400 acres and was 0% contained as of Wednesday night.The blaze started around 3:15 p.m. Wednesday in the area of Road 222 and Road 200 in North Fork, and led to evacuation orders issued by the Madera County Sheriff’s Office shortly after.The Fork Fire was moving no...

An eastern Madera County wildfire that prompted many evacuation orders burned 400 acres and was 0% contained as of Wednesday night.

The blaze started around 3:15 p.m. Wednesday in the area of Road 222 and Road 200 in North Fork, and led to evacuation orders issued by the Madera County Sheriff’s Office shortly after.

The Fork Fire was moving north and crossed Willow Creek, heading toward Road 225, said Natasha Fouts, a Cal Fire spokesperson, around 7:30 p.m.

There were no confirmed structure losses or injuries on Wednesday night from Cal Fire, but Fouts said the Fork Fire is burning in an area with lots of dead pine trees and brush, along with “quite a few homes,” including in Cascadel Woods, a community also hit by the 2020 Creek Fire.

Cal Fire estimates 400 structures are threatened by the Fork Fire.

“The fire is burning in steep, rugged country affected by tree mortality,” Cal Fire reported around 8:45 p.m., adding that “hot, dry weather,” drought conditions, and thick vegetation are influencing fire behavior.

Fouts didn’t have a firefighting personnel estimate on Wednesday night, but said equipment included a very large air tanker (VLAT), which doesn’t fly at night for safety reasons.

North Fork is southeast of Bass Lake, Oakhurst and Yosemite National Park. It’s about a 40-minute drive from the rural town to Yosemite’s south entrance along Highway 41.

The cause of the wildfire is under investigation. Firefighters don’t yet have an estimated containment date.

Madera County has evacuation orders and warnings listed on an interactive map at community.zonehaven.com.

“There is an immediate threat to life,” the sheriff’s office said Wednesday afternoon. “This is an evacuation order to leave NOW. The area is being closed to public access. Take action immediately.”

Officials said those in need of evacuation assistance should call 911.

As of 8 p.m. Wednesday, the sheriff’s office reported the following areas were under evacuation orders:

The sheriff’s office said Cascadel residents need to exit via Cascadel Road, and that deputies are at Cascadel Road and Cascadel Heights Road to escort people out. Residents on Road 225 need to exit via Road 225 to North Fork. Deputies are in the area to escort them out.

Additionally, the following areas were under evacuation warnings:

“There is a potential threat to life and property,” the sheriff’s office added. “Monitor the situation and be prepared to take action immediately. Don’t wait for an evacuation order to leave if you feel threatened. Those who require additional time to evacuate, and those with pets and livestock should leave now.”

These roads were closed:

There is an evacuation shelter at the Oakhurst Community Center, 39800 Fresno Flats Road, Oakhurst, where Red Cross volunteers are providing evacuees with a place to stay, food and water, and other resources. Fouts said small animals can be taken there, and large evacuated animals can be taken to the Coarsegold Rodeo Grounds, 44777 Rodeo Grounds Lane, Coarsegold.

Fouts said evacuations included the Vipassana meditation center, Cascadel Woods, and parts of the town of North Fork, including North Fork Elementary School. She didn’t have an estimate Wednesday night regarding how far the wildfire was from the town of North Fork.

Pacific Gas & Electric Company reported hundreds of power outages throughout the foothill region on Wednesday.

People can sign up for emergency alerts from Madera County at MCAlert.org, or by texting their zip code to 888777.

Another wildfire, the Power Fire, ignited Tuesday in the Auberry area of eastern Fresno County. That fire burned 130 acres and was 50% contained as of Wednesday night.

The last major wildfire to hit the region was the Oak Fire that burned 19,244 acres in Mariposa County during July and August. It ignited a couple weeks after another Mariposa County blaze, the Washburn Fire, that threatened Yosemite’s giant sequoias.

A couple other remote Yosemite wildfires, the Red Fire and Rodgers Fire, ignited in early August.

‘Utter devastation’: Residents return to burned homes and shattered dreams

AUBERRY, Calif. —The driver of the dusty pickup slowed and lowered his window, reached out and cautiously lifted the steel cable that was hovering over the dirt road and connected to a downed power pole on the shoulder, blocking his exit from this burned out Auberry hamlet.The driver, who declined to give his name because he was in an evacuated area of the massive Creek fire in ...

AUBERRY, Calif. —

The driver of the dusty pickup slowed and lowered his window, reached out and cautiously lifted the steel cable that was hovering over the dirt road and connected to a downed power pole on the shoulder, blocking his exit from this burned out Auberry hamlet.

The driver, who declined to give his name because he was in an evacuated area of the massive Creek fire in the Sierra, had two passengers — a local firefighter who used his connections to get them all access into the area and also refused to give his name, and resident Mark Van Aacken. The fire has burned more than 160,000 acres and destroyed hundreds of structures.

Together, the trio were surveying their town’s damage along Shaver Springs Road off Tollhouse Road and relaying what they found back to anxious neighbors in limbo since the evacuation, unsure if their life will continue as normal once the roads are opened or if they have to rebuild anew from the ash.

It’s an act of bittersweet generosity that mountain residents throughout California do for each other every year, when the homegrown intel of backroads and relationships forged over the years with neighbors pays off with access when the official government order is to wait.

“We have resources, we know everybody,” the driver said.

For Van Aacken, Wednesday’s access deepened the pain he felt Tuesday night, when a firefighter showed him a photo of his burned down home.

“But still a picture doesn’t do it justice apparently,” Van Aacken, 40, said. “Seeing it firsthand is kind of another situation. I’m kind of bummed my wife isn’t with me to see it at the moment.”

Van Aacken and his wife moved to Auberry almost four years ago from Arizona to be closer to family in the area and to settle down and raise their twin 7-year-old daughters in the great outdoors.

“It’s been great, 4-wheeling all the time ... just being in the outdoors away from the city life,” he said. “It’s always like camping, it’s the small town, you know?”

The family has kept tabs on the state’s rash of fires over the last month and knew their area was at risk, so they evacuated as soon as Fresno County sheriff’s deputies knocked on their door and told them to leave.

“I feel like we’ve just gotten away with it every year,” Van Aacken said, referring to their annual fire risk. “So I feel like we were a little relaxed about the fact that every tiny fire that came up they dropped so [many resources] on it we never thought it’d be that big an issue.”

He then caught himself, saying “granted it always seemed every year like, ‘maybe this year is the year’ ya know? But …”

Just uphill and across a road from Van Aacken’s home, his father’s was still standing Wednesday. In another area of the forest, his brother’s home was lost.

“We were just hoping at least one of the homes was still standing,” he said.

For the two other men in the truck with Van Aacken, the day was an emotional rollercoaster.

“Highs and lows, one victory and then utter devastation,” the driver said.

The driver’s second passenger, the local firefighter, was helping relay information to neighbors.

“We came up here because we don’t know,” the firefighter said. Crews have been guessing on where there have been successess and failures and relaying that information to him but no one has shown photos to prove it, he said.

“I’m not going to hear anybody else’s words,” he said. “A lot of our neighbors had no idea so we came up here like ‘hey we’re going to check everybody out,’ and we’ll tell everyone back in town, ‘Hey man, your house is gone. Yours isn’t.’”

The men had already broken the news two at least two other residents that their homes were gone when they were leaving the area with Van Aacken in the truck.

“I already told them because they want to know as soon as you find out,” the firefighter said. “Obviously they’re super upset but they wanted to know ... it’s worse waiting.”

“That’s the worst part,” Van Aacken said in agreement. “Once you know, you can start to make decisions on what to do next.”

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